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Ekbom's syndrome, biting arthropods, environmental & other causes of itching

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  1. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 26 2011 20:59:39
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    I read new article yesterday about Ekbom's Syndrome (also known as "Delusional Parasitosis"):

    Current Psychiatry Reports DOI 10.1007/s11920-011-0188-0
    Ekbom Syndrome: A Delusional Condition of “Bugs in the Skin,” Nancy C. Hinkle
    Springer Science+Business Media, LLC (outside the USA) 2011

    Just as many people who come to Bedbugger really do have bed bugs, some have other conditions ranging from fleas, to mites or lice. In very rare cases, people may be suffering from Ekbom's Syndrome (also known as "Delusional Parasitosis").

    When I first started the site in 2006, bed bugs were not as common as they are today. Many pest management professionals were not very experienced with inspecting for bed bugs. Some would take a cursory glance at a mattress, and if someone did not have bed bugs resting obviously upon it, might suggest they were "imagining things." In many cases, this was probably incorrect, and it put people who were suffering in a very bad situation.

    It's important to remember that a pest professional can't diagnose someone with Ekbom's Syndrome, only a doctor can.

    These days, thankfully, I suspect most pest management professionals have a lot more bed bug experience than they did at the time. There are more tools available for monitoring for bed bugs and determining if they are the problem or not. And in the absence of bed bug evidence over time, I'd hope that most people were more clued in today about ruling out all of the other possible entomological and medical possibilities.

    The thing I want to share with you from the article is a table that outlines possible diagnoses or infestations which should be ruled out before Ekbom's syndrome is considered by medical professionals. The table is helpful for those who may not be finding evidence of bed bugs, and for the rest of us to be aware of.

    I can't paste in what Hinkle's Table 2 looks like visually, so I am reformatting it below. I list each Diagnosis (Infestation) from the table below, and below each one, I have then pasted what is listed under the heading Description (reasons diagnosis can be ruled out) in the table; I have added boldface type to make it easier to read:


    Table 2 Differentials to consider and how they do not reflect symptomatology (patient complaints)

    Scabies

    • Predilection sites, such as the interdigital web, rather than whole body infestation
    • Produce localized pruritus rather than paresthesia
    • Do not spontaneously arise; acquired only by close personal contact with infested individual

    Human head lice

    • Occur only on head hair, not a whole body infestation
    • Visible to naked eye
    • Cannot jump or fly
    • Cannot survive for more than a couple of days off the host
    • Produce pruritus on the scalp only

    Bed bugs

    • Produce pruritus, not paresthesia
    • Visible to naked eye
    • Cannot jump or fly
    • Lesions not under clothing, only on body regions exposed outside bedclothes

    Bird mites

    • Produce pruritus and paresthesia
    • Visible to naked eye
    • Cannot jump or fly
    • Cannot survive on human body (or any other mammal), so they do not establish true infestation
    • Limited temporally to spring and early-summer, when nestlings fledge
    • Do not persist for months (rarely weeks) and do not spread to infest secondary location (e.g., vehicle)


    Springtails (Collembola)

    • Cannot bite, sting, or infest human bodies
    • Common in homes, particularly in bathrooms and other areas of high humidity (feed on fungi in damp areas)
    • Visible to naked eye
    • Jump like fleas

    Other key considerations:

    • Cheyletiella mites (a dog, cat, and rabbit parasite) can attempt to feed on humans and yield a pruritic rash. However, these mites cannot sustain themselves on humans, so they cannot establish an infestation and thus yield only transitory, self-limiting discomfort. These mites are rare and easily eliminated on the canine, feline, or lapine host using currently available pet ectoparasiticides.
    • Vague descriptions are indicative of the populace’s imprecise biological understanding, reflected in oxymorons such as “flying larvae” and “jumping mites.” Ekbom syndrome patients claim their bugs exhibit behaviors that scientists recognize as atypical of arthropods or biologically impossible. When it comes right down to it, there are no creatures that exhibit the characteristics attributed by patients. There are no invisible bugs. There are no facultative parasites, bugs that can feed in the environment and then switch to infesting the human body. There are no bugs that eat clothing that can also infest human bodies. Spiders do not bite humans; they are predaceous, not hematophagous. There are no human parasites that can fly. There are no external animal parasites that can infest humans. Humans cannot acquire scabies from other animals; strains are host specific. There is no such thing as a “black pepper mite,” “paper mite,” or “cable mite.”

    A final point under "Other key considerations" was omitted above.

    Note that there are also other possibilities besides those listed above: fleas, body lice, other biting mites (such as those from rodents), to name just a few.

    Also note: regarding bed bugs not biting under bedclothes or under clothing: I think that many of us have experienced bed bug bites even under loose clothing -- and it makes sense that if clothing has gaps, bed bugs could crawl under it. It also makes sense that they could bite parts of the body which may be sometimes exposed outside bedclothes, or under loose bedclothes.

    Still, I thought this was a helpful chart, and that it would be helpful to know a bit about the symptoms of Ekbom's Syndrome, as well as to compare the signs of these various other problems.

    Update (9/2013):

    I also recommend this helpful article from entomologist Mike Potter (U of Kentucky) which David Cain has recently linked to here: "Invisible Itches: Insect and Non-Insect Causes."

    Note that Potter offers the following list of possible causes for unexplained itching:


    PRINCIPAL CAUSES OF ITCHES AND BITES OF UNKNOWN ORIGIN

    Obscure Biting Arthropods*
    mites (e.g., bird, rodent, scabies)
    lice
    fleas
    chiggers
    biting midges/mosquitoes
    ticks
    bedbugs

    Household Products
    detergents (especially phosphate-based)
    soaps
    cosmetics/hair products
    ammonia-based cleansers
    medications
    printing inks (e.g., carbonless)
    clothing (especially fire retardant)

    ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
    A. Physical irritants
    paper, fabric, or insulation fibers
    low humidity
    seasonal changes in temperature
    static electricity

    B. Chemical irritants
    formaldehyde (e.g., from particle board, wall and floor coverings)
    ammonia
    solvents/resins associated with paints and adhesives
    tobacco smoke
    volatiles from asphalt and tar installation

    Health-Related Conditions
    pregnancy
    communicable diseases (e.g., chicken pox, measles)
    stress
    diabetes, liver, or kidney disorders
    food allergies
    insect phobias

    *Many of these pests are large enough to be seen without magnification. One should also consider the possibility of delayed irritation such as from bites obtained while outdoors.

    Potter also highlights a phenomenon some of us may have witnessed:

    One’s emotional state can likewise induce skin reactions that can be mistaken for insect bites. Stress and conflict at work or home can produce itching and irritation. The itching response can be induced in other individuals simply by the “power of suggestion”; i.e., when one person in a group feels an itch or bite and begins to talk about it, others also feel the urge to scratch as well (a condition known as Bell’s syndrome).

    Lots of people will suddenly start itching if you talk about bed bugs or if they see pictures of them (for example on our site).

    Finally, it's worth looking closely at what Potter's article says about the "environmental factors" which are often overlooked as causes of itching, and which David Cain often brings to our attention.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  2. eurydice

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue May 3 2011 3:51:15
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    I am confused about the assertion that spiders don't bite humans. That goes against everything I have ever heard.... ideas?

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue May 3 2011 8:34:39
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    It's a good question and perhaps some of the entomologists can comment.

  4. BBJames

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed May 4 2011 0:54:27
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    Nobugs,

    The following statement Spiders do not bite humans; they are predaceous, not hematophagous should have read, Spiders do not prey on humans; they are predaceous, not hematophagous.

    To better explain: Predaceous can be defined as- hunting and killing other animals for food.
    and Hematophagous can be defined as- the practice of animals/insects feeding on blood.

    So therefore, spiders can bite humans, they just don't bite with the intention of feeding.

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed May 4 2011 22:22:55
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    Thanks, BBJames. This is in line with what I've heard from experts.

    The above quote was from an article by Nancy Hinkle.

  6. Koebner

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu May 5 2011 10:43:01
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    One slight problem with the bed bug element. Where affected individuals have conditions like eczema or psoriasis that can be triggered by BBs, the pattern of lesions can be complicated to discern. Bites on one part of the body can quickly turn to psoriasis or eczema, with only a brief period of visible pruritis & can provoke more widely-diffused attacks of the existing condition.

    Also the "does not occur under clothes" seems to me mere wishful thinking. When my infestation was at its worst, sitting on the sofa or at the computer would frequently mean playing host to BBs whilst dressed.

  7. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri May 6 2011 1:39:29
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    Koebner - 14 hours ago  » 

    Also the "does not occur under clothes" seems to me mere wishful thinking. When my infestation was at its worst, sitting on the sofa or at the computer would frequently mean playing host to BBs whilst dressed.

    Yes-- As I said, I think this is inaccurate based on my experience and those others report. At least as regards LOOSE clothing.

    I can't imagine why a bed bug wouldn't be able to climb up your leg and bite you on your calf if you're wearing trousers which hang down and allow this, just as one example. If this is the first exposed area it reaches, then all the more reason for it to do so.

  8. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon May 16 2011 16:46:20
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    WebMD article on recent findings on "delusional skin infestation" by the Mayo Clinic. Article notes that about 60% of complainants are diagnosed with dermatitis. What concerns me is that if someone is reacting to a serious BB infestation, they may have a skin reaction, but there will be no "parasites" living on the body. As BB have been "off the radar" for 50+ years, could doctors also be overlooking causes other than psychoses?

    http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/news/20110516/biopsies-samples-no-benefit-for-delusional-bug-syndrome

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  9. Koebner

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue May 17 2011 13:03:24
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    Short answer - yes. I got to the point where I was taking samples to doctors' appointments, just so we could skip over 50 years of clinical ignorance & cut to the stuff they understand; "This is a biting insect, an haematophage. It's a bed bug. I have lots more at home. As long as I continue to be bitten by these insects, my psoriasis is going to keep up this isomorphic bite response."

  10. Rosae

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue May 17 2011 14:24:11
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    Can bed bugs bite through tight clothing, e.g. a legging or t-shirt?

  11. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri May 20 2011 1:41:10
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    Rosae - 2 days ago  » 
    Can bed bugs bite through tight clothing, e.g. a legging or t-shirt?

    We're told they won't bite through clothing as a general rule, but they may certainly crawl under it if it is loose enough or has gaps.

  12. AsSoftAsSilk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Jun 21 2011 17:36:23
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    Ok please help me out here, I know I have bed bugs because I found two adults and am currently working on ridding my house of them. I also know my cat's got fleas, treated them and am trying to rid my house of these as well. However today I was laying on a blanket on my floor reading when a tiny red bug scutters by on the page of my book. First reaction baby bed bug, however when I try to squish it, it jumps. I mean I literally had it between my fingernails. Are we positive bed bugs don't jump? What other bug could this be? Should I be at all worried that the bed bugs cross breaded with the fleas? Or is that just too many SI-FY flix? Anyway could somebody please help me identify this new insect/parasite. If I find one more new type of insect in my home I'll probably be posting under the feeling suicidal subject here in the forum! Also I have found a bed bug cruising accross my carpet in the middle of they day, I was under the impression they were nocternal or at least they didn't like light, so does seeing them during the day indicate a bad or worse infestation?

  13. AsSoftAsSilk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Jun 21 2011 21:41:37
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    If you live in or frequent rural/wooded area's another bug you may want to consider if your being bitten and cannot find a culprit is the Chigger.

  14. little bugger

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jun 26 2011 14:40:06
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    Rosae - 1 month ago  » 
    Can bed bugs bite through tight clothing, e.g. a legging or t-shirt?

    I think they can.

    william

  15. little bugger

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jun 26 2011 14:42:18
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    I think if you have had bed bugs in your home and have gone through the trouble then you might well develop Delusional Parasitosis.

    william

  16. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Jun 28 2011 10:37:44
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    little bugger - 1 day ago  » 
    I think if you have had bed bugs in your home and have gone through the trouble then you might well develop Delusional Parasitosis.
    william

    You need to read the article referenced. Delusional parasitosis is a medical/psychological condition. It's not something you "get" from having dealt with bed bugs.

  17. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Jul 31 2011 7:20:52
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    Spelling note: nobugs are you able to correct the spelling «Chyletiella» in the thread title to «Cheyletiella»?

  18. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Aug 1 2011 0:14:17
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    Thanks!

  19. Uncle Bugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 21 2011 8:25:19
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    Nobugsonme,

    Within the last 5 days, my son (7) developed a few itchy bites that increased every day and he now has about 10 - 12. They come in clusters but are usually located on his trunk (lower back, upper back, chest, back of the neck at the base, front of the neck at the base, only a few on his arms and legs). After which, my wife got a row of bites on her lower back (about 3 -4) followed by my daughter (5) who got a few random bites on her legs and back. Then, my youngest (2) got some on his tummy and inside his thighs near his diaper line. I have not been bitten (or at least have not had a reaction) although I share a bed with my wife. In short, they look like the pictures i see on line for bed bug bites.

    Therefore, we are freaked out and suspect bedbugs. I have torn apart every bed and inspected seams and the like with a high powered light and lupe. Nothing. We've seen no fecal matter or blood or skin casings on anything. I have also looked behind pictures in drawers etc. Don't want to bore you with listing all the places we've searched.

    Now for the interesting part, my wife saw tiny brown/black round bugs crawling on her shirt sleeve near her wrist. She removed the shirt and put it in a zip loc back. Her sleeves were crawling with them. They are TINY, but we can see them with the naked eye.

    We thought the source was something in our closet where this shirt normally hangs (we've nuked all of our clothes and sheets, etc). Then we found the same bugs infesting our Hamster cage. We quickly removed the Hamster and its cage from the house. I grabbed the food dish, which had quite a few of the buggers and bagged it. We have vacuumed the entire house from top top bottom and cleaned all the kids beds, clothes, and the kids themselves.

    The kids had been plaring with the Hamster that day and my wife had been supervising, so they all had contact with the Hamster. I have low regard for rodents, even cute ones, so I do not touch the hamster -- thinking this may be why I don't have bites.

    The night of the discovery, we noticed our 2 yr old son scratching his head like we've never seen him do before. So we inspected his scalp and saw the same little bugs. In the bath immediately. Regular shampoo and soap seemed to get rid of them.

    Its been a few days now and we've had slowing of the pace of new bites, but they are still increasing. Based on what we have seen on line, I fear this may be tropical rat mites. We believe they got on my wife's shirt sleeves from reaching into the cage. We also believe the kids may have picked them up from handling the hamster.

    We have the taken the specimens to two vets. At the first, a technician said these were fly larva from dead rodents (the Hamster is not dead). Then the actual vet said it was lice, but nothing more specific. We took it to a different vet who sent it to a lab for a better ID. We told her our theory was tropical rate mites. We should have an answer tonight.

    We are trying to find out if this is lice or mites. I can find a lot of info out there on tropical rat mites, but very little on body lice. My question is, are you aware of any types of body lice that can be transferred from rodents to humans? If so, do they produce bites that look like bed bugs? If body lice, why did we find it in my sons hair? I have a ton more questions, but will start there.

  20. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 21 2011 23:31:45
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    Uncle Bugs - 15 hours ago  » 

    We are trying to find out if this is lice or mites. I can find a lot of info out there on tropical rat mites, but very little on body lice. My question is, are you aware of any types of body lice that can be transferred from rodents to humans? If so, do they produce bites that look like bed bugs? If body lice, why did we find it in my sons hair? I have a ton more questions, but will start there.

    Hi Uncle Bugs,

    I am not an expert on bed bugs, and I know even less about body lice and mites.

    I hope some real experts will see this and respond.

  21. buggerem

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Jan 11 2012 11:10:07
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    Hi Unclebugs
    Just been on web reading this info myself - don't know if it will shed some light,
    (Found it on Illinois public health website.)

    - Rodent and bird mites may bite people when their hosts die or abandon their nests. Three types of rodent mites readily bite humans: the house mouse mite (Liponyssoides saguineus), spiny rat mite (Laelaps echidnina) and tropical rat mite (Ornithonyssus bacoti). The house mouse mite prefers to suck the blood of mice, but also will bite rats and people, often causing a rash around the bite. They prefer warm places (e.g., around pipes and furnaces) where rodents live. The spiny rat mite feeds on rats at night and hides by day in cracks and crevices around rat nests and resting places. The tropical rat mite’s bite is painful and causes skin irritation and itching. -

    Good luck.

  22. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Feb 14 2012 13:07:54
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    Liponyssoides sanguineus is the correct spelling (since spelling has been a problem associated with this post/query). BTW, this mite species is a vector of rickettsial pox caused by Rickettsia akari first identified from Queens, NY in 1946.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult in all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology.
  23. Alberta has bugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Feb 22 2012 1:34:42
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    Liponyssoides sanguineus ,could these be making a comeback as well?

    Since a few of these bugs that were problems before the 40's and then maybe not so much with DDT, could we be seeing a revival of mites and bugs that have bothered humans and animals in past years?

  24. Marla123

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu May 24 2012 10:21:50
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    Since I moved into this house 9 months ago, I have been feeling as if I were being bitten. The feeling tapered off during the cold months. But it's been mostly warm since I have been living here and I also notice a gnat(fruit fly -- I actually think there's more than one kind of gnat) problem which has gotten worse lately and I looked for bedbug and haven't seen any or bite marks. I really can't see the gnats without my reading glasses. But sometimes I feel something crawling on me and I can't see anything, I can't see the gnat fly away and then one day I noticed something in the air that looked alive but it was so small almost like a speck of dust and I don't know whether this is a baby gnat or something else. But I think that is what's biting me when I can't see it but also the gnats bite too. I've found a remedy for getting rid of the gnats (a homemade trap) and they've been reduced significantly. I still feel something crawling all over my body. How can I determine what this is? I've only been able to see that tiny, tiny creature once and could not catch it. Help!

  25. brooklyn_bites

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu May 24 2012 21:44:25
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    Wanted to mention that scabies can be contracted through contact with bedding as well; not just physical contact with infected individuals.

    Marla, what do the bites you are receiving look like? Is there any pattern or prime locations on your body that you are receiving bites?

  26. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat May 26 2012 15:27:14
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    Over the past 30 years, I've only had the house mouse mite (Liponyssoides sanguineus) brought in for identification about 3 times from apts in NYC. I believe the people did tell me of a particular rash that began and then went away. When biting mites are captured, they are usually Ornithonyssus species, ones that are typically associated with their rodent or bird hosts. One time birds were suspected because on adjoining roof and windows, but the mite was one associated with mice and examination of the grocery store below revealed a mouse problem and then later wall holes were discovered behind kitchen appliances (mice crawling about at this time sort of gave it away, too!).

  27. rayofsun

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Oct 8 2012 0:30:19
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    Hi. Did you ever find out what the "mite" was, and how did you get rid of it? What exactly did it look like? Did it jump at all? What did the bites look like? Thanks...I'm trying to diagnose what's biting me too.

  28. teenybugLARGEPAIN

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    Mon Oct 29 2012 23:20:23
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    This is ridiculous and embarrasing--But I just got done taking my FOURTH bath today.

    Let me start from the beginning. My daughter, 4, has always had "issues with her skin". We have been to every type of doctor- pediatrician, allergist,dermatologist.......Basically, we felt like--what ever is causing these "red bumps" has got to be an allergy. We basically cleaned her skin thouroughly and her "scalp" everyday and lotioned her up to "make a barrier" as the allergist said. They told us she basically has an autoimmune disorder where the body thinks it needs to fight something, when there is nothing really there---I.E. all these red bumps.
    We have been fighting these bumps for 3 years. At times, I really felt like, WOW--she is starting to grow out of this! Her lesions on her scalp only happened during certain times of the year, beginning of summer, fall...and they werent numerous anymore-- it was just one, maybe two. And i knew how to handle them by now-- clean skin thoroughly, hydrogen peroxide, hydrocortisone-- GONE.( by the way, we had PEST PEOPLE come twice to check for fleas, beadbugs...nothing.All we ever found was little orange bits here and there under Greta's bed-- they didnt think anything of it.)
    Well, lets fast forward.... She woke up with a usual bump on her face. I fixed it, then that night she had 3 more...I was like- UH OH. Then the next morning she had red bumps UP AND DOWN her legs!!! She hadnt had bumps like these since she was 2! Something told me, these arent the usual "bumps". I was bathing my younger son, and noticed he too had a red bump or two, on the back of his neck. I immediately thought FLEAS. Its the end of summer, and "did I give Chowder his meds??" So, I looked at the cat, FLEAS. Ok. Cool. I can handle this. Gave Chowder a flea bath. about 50 fleas were lying in the tub.I gave him the meds on his back to prevent and kill fleas.... Happy with that-- we moved on. The next morning, my daughter awoke with 10 more bites. I started paying attention-- i looked under her bed and saw little white ovals...EGGS. OMG. How long have fleas been in our home? And howcome I havent been bit? There are 5 people here...only her and Beau have been bit-- I found out if can take a week...and BAM. You are infested.
    So, I gave Chowder 3 more flea baths, vaccumed everywhere-sprinkled the poison powder on the carpets, sprayed under the beds. Called the Exterminator to come and BOMB the house and surroundings... OKAY, I can handle this-- just another day or two with some stragglers...then I got bit. I also had the sensation that something was crawling all over my body.
    And the weirdest thing-- I felt like little bugs were crawling in and out of my nose. I thought i was losing it!!! I would be standing in front of the mirror, FEELING something crawling into my nose, BUT NOTHING WAS THERE!!!
    I thought maybe its just baby fleas? They arent big enough to see yet? I jumped in the tub hoping to drown what ever it was on my head, on my skin.......laying there I noticed these tiny white things- each with their own little air bubble. I could have SWORN i saw one move. LOOK THERE!! Again! It totally just swam down, and now its back up again!! ( I for sure thought I was SEEING things) I "caught" some in a bowl and watched. No more movement. OH WELL. But!! I felt MUCH better:-)
    Through out the day I would notice, if I sat down in front of my laptop, all of the SUDDEN, I would get a RUSH of creepy crawly things on my back, in my hair...my chest and got BIT!! It actually stung! Again, back up to the tub, immerse myself in water and watch these little clearish white things bob up and down in the water.
    I called my friend who is a Vet....I told her how I had been grooming the Flea Infested cat with a flea comb...she asked me" did he have dandruff? I replied," YES and SO MUCH OF IT!! I was pulling in off by the gobs!" She said, "did you wear gloves?" I then got nervous and said," No, why?" She said, " I know what you have, its called Cheyletiella. You got it from physically handling it.But dont worry-- it cant reproduce on you, it will just bother you for 3 weeks." THREE WEEKS??? I cannot live this way for THREE weeks! The crawling, biting sensation is absolutely INSANE!!!
    My poor daughter...Is this what she has been suffering for years with( besides the flea bites of course)? It would make sense. We had two cats, they both slept under her crib...they were her favorite play toy! When Willow died last year, Chowder barely went up to her room...and come to think of it, her " red bumps" came and went...Nothing super serious.
    And now here we are....Flea infested home, mites are crawling all over us, and we are STUCK in this house because of HURRICANE SANDY! So, needless to say, Greta has had three baths, Beau has had 2, My oldest, who has never been bit by ANYTHING, got NONE and me-- FOUR.
    I have a few questions. If you have the answer, PLEASE PLEASE tell me. I am completely freaking out at this point.
    1.HOW DO I KILL THESE SUCKERS?? Like from every room? I think they are everywhere!
    2. What kinds of things can i wash/lotions/spray myself with to ward them off?
    3. Is there a drug I can take to get them to die if they are living on me? Kind of like what one would take for scabies....? (As I scratch my shoulder-- something is biting me!)

    The cat is going to the vet as soon as mine Re-opens...My friend told me he needs to be given "Revolution". Kills all parasites. THANK GOD.

    While he is away I am having this place totally bombed for fleas. Professionally. Like, couch, chairs, mattresses...you name it, it will have pesticide on it.

    OH. And before I forget, I have found a bunch of these "mites" once I found out what they were....Mine like to hang out at my computer screen- almost like they jump on me as soon as I sit down to type! Some are orangish- bigger than others, and some are clear and SO TINY!I swear I think they live in the key pad and once I start typing they jump on and crawl up my arms:-/

    Please tell me someone knows a specific cure to these horrible parasites.

    Thank you!!
    Sincerely Infested.

  29. Whats Biting Me

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Wed Nov 21 2012 1:52:31
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    Hi teenybugLARGEPAIN and everyone else. My family had a mold mite (look up grocer's itch) that was nearly invisible and biting us all the time... Recently, circumstantially a great conversation has popped up between myself and a bunch of other people as an offshoot to an Amazon product review. . . . The conversation goes way deeper than the product, and I encourage you to take a look.

    In short, you may very well have this mold mite and a dehumidifier will help you tremendously along with essential oils. If you have pets they could be the source of the mites, or additional mites and they need to be dealt with by using something like revolution and Cedarcide on their fur. '

    Take a look at the 19 pages of comments! off this one woman's review. There is a ton of info there. Good luck!

  30. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Sep 17 2013 23:57:06
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    I have updated the post above to incorporate a link to Dr. Potter's article on insect and non-insect causes of itching, and to highlight the causes he lists. Changed the title to reflect broader scope. Thanks to David for sharing the Mike Potter link-- or at least reminding me of it-- today.

    I think this is on its way to becoming a FAQ.

    Anything else to be added?????

  31. Mairead27

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Sun Dec 15 2013 19:46:56
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    Some people tend to get red itchy skin in the winter, especially when it gets really cold. I get them myself and they are so irritating. This year, I'm noticing single white bumps at the center of the red itchiness that go away within 15 - 30 minutes. I've been getting them on my legs, especially where the seams of my pants are. Today, I wore a turtleneck and an hour after taking it off, I got that red itchy skin with a white bump.

    Of course, I freaked out so I checked online to see if this is a severe case of dry skin due to the winter. It seems like emotional stress plus "winter skin"causes this skin problem.

    It seems to be known as dermatographia: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/Dermatographia/DS00755

    It could also be dermatitis as mentioned earlier.

    Just throwing this out because it is winter and some people may mistaken a bed bug bite with a skin problem.

  32. Bannef

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Dec 16 2013 22:03:17
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    Unfortunately I did the opposite - I mistook bed bugs for severely dry skin. In actuality I had both, which made the bites worse and difficult to identify, since I had scratched them up so badly that they looked more like acne than a bug bite (it was also during finals, and when I'm stressed my self control for things like "don't scratch itches" go out the window).

    Of course finding a bug in my bed and reading all this great information hasn't really made the stress or scratching less, but at least I know I'm not just being a worrywart. And Mairead27, thanks for the info on dermatographia, I've definitely had that once and had no idea what was going on.

  33. fed up in frederick

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    Posted 10 months ago
    Tue Jan 28 2014 17:53:45
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    I'm having a lot of BB-like symptoms, and have been treating for them for about the last 6 months, but many of them just don't match. Also my treatments don't seem to be working one bit. I'm wondering if there's any more information on the springtails or collembola? I've found a site by a woman who believes that a "genetically crossed fungus/bacteria breaking through the skin" causes some of the pinprick feelings, and the collembola are attracted to the fungus. Has anyone else heard of this? Apparently it's a relatively new phenomenon, and many others have had a similar experience. Here is her website:

    stopskinmites.com

    Any thoughts?

  34. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Wed Dec 10 2014 19:25:21
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    I am removing this from the green stickies because it is covered in the FAQS About Bed Bugs for Forum Users, itself a green sticky.

    Fewer stickies makes it easier for people to find information. People are more likely to see and read a few stickies (and thus find more) if there are not so many. Also, for stickies that get updated, updates are more likely to be seen if they are in "Latest Discussions".

    I am tagging this thread “former stickies”, so you can find it again easily. You should also subscribe to this or other threads you want to follow. You can do this at the top of any thread.


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