Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

Questions for Experts about Ground Zero Infestations, showering, hair, vomit

(21 posts)
  1. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Feb 22 2013 19:59:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Maybe these aren't ground zero, but I'm thinking it must be serious. I've watched some of the videos (one was of an elderly couple with what seemed to be over 50,000 bugs which received a free heat treatment). I can't imagine not being able to kill or vacuum a few of them if they are just walking around in broad daylight like they own the place. But, they were just walking around at the elderly couple's home, who were too elderly to really do the physical labor to remove them.

    Anyway, sometimes I've thought things were urban legend when reading internet sites, so let me ask if the following are possible:

    1. Years ago (at least 2-3), there was a story I read where the man checked into a hotel room. He didn't check the bed. He woke up with bugs crawling all over him. He went into the bathtub and he said 50 to 100 bugs just floated off him. He described it as hundreds of bugs floating in the water. Once he started to move, wouldn't the bugs disperse a bit (Darwin: if you are a bug and you don't move, they may kill you). I can't find the story but I bet it was around 2009.

    2. If you have a heavy infestation, we've read that bedbugs have been found in dreads, weaves, etc..or hair extensions that aren't washed often. So, let's say you tend to wear your hair up or in a ponytail for a week or two without washing it, would you have bugs in your hair? Would you go into the shower and the bugs just come off your body and hair when you finally took your shower? As you rinse the hair that had the weave or extensions, would bugs come off of you? I've read some stories on here about people finding one bug floating in the bathtub but not 50-100 usually. It may be based on the size of the infestation.

    3. Does vomit, bleach, water, lemon juice, etc. kill bedbugs on contact? Is it just alcohol, steam and chemicals or does any liquid kill them?

    4. Shower vs bath if you packtite items when you get home and run and take a shower/bath as part of your prevention plan.

    Thanks for your patience!

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  2. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Feb 23 2013 9:54:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ahhh, those questions conjure up visions of the nasty places some of us are "lucky enough" to get to visit and work at.

    However, I'm off to run erands and will get back to your queeries later on.

    Thanks for your patience ! pjb

  3. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Feb 23 2013 12:28:41
    #



    Login to Send PM

    OK, I'm back, answers/comments for your review and consideration:

    1. WHen I'm feeding bed bugs, once they insert their mouthparts and begin feeding, it is surprising how much I need to disturb them to get them to stop feeding and/or move. In the majority of cases I need to nearly "scrape them off" my arm using card stock. Others may have different observations but that's what I'm seeing. As such, it seems to me that they can endure a bunch of "rolling around" and/or movement as long as we don't roll over on them which may result in crushing them.

    2. Unwashed hair and such ? Yuck, really ? Our job is bad enough without having to think about how bad some of these folks smell. Yo, you folks from abroad, attention: years ago "in the colonies" those folks invented and developed a thing called soap. We now have soap, shower gel and shampoo too ! And, just so you know, that tiled closet area in your house is not a place to store your stuff. It's a place to take what we call "a shower". And, that big white trough looking thing is not really a place for you to house your chickens, goats, whatever. Actually in American it's called "a tub" and it's used for an activity we call "bathing". Both showering and bathing involve the use of soap, shampoo and water. When mixed, the combination of water & soap or shampoo will result in what we call suds or bubbles. Don't be scared, this is normal and the suds or bubbles will eventually subside when your showering or bathing activity is completed.

    Usually a shoer or bath can be completed in less than say 10 minutes. However, if today is your initial attempt at showering or bathing, we, that is your fellow Americans, neighbors and everyone you will interact with later today, want you to take as long as it takes to successfully wash your entire body, including your hair, such that you no longer smell like you've been swimming with the toilet fish.

    Additionally, please note that it's OK to shower and bath several times per week. And for some of you, speaking as a qualified expert, I recommend that you go ahead and undertake this activity on a daily basis, preferably in the morning before your interact with others.

    On the personal side, if you note that subsequent to undertaking this shower & bathing activity that other folks seem happier to see you and will actually engage you in conversation for periods longer than just seconds, then it's likely you're doing an acceptable job in the shwer or bath.

    OK ? Good ! (The aforeposted passage was provided as a public service ! )

    3. Will bugs whash off ?
    Hmmmm . . . Firstly, refer to #2 above. If these folks can share the nickname "Krustie" then maybe not. However, insects breath through spiracles which may appear like tiny little "port holes" that they can shut. Ever try drowning an ant when you were a kid? They can stay under water a long time. Now some of the folks referred to in #2 above may need "flea & tick" type shampoo and that would likely yeild different results.

    However, my guess, adn this is strictly a guess here, is that whether bed bugs would be removed via a shower or bath is dependent upon a number of factors which may include but not be limited to: water temperature, density of human harborage area (hair, dreds, between folds of skin, etc.), verocity of washing activity, etc.

    4. As you rinse? Hmmm . . . Well, of course I'm thinking like garden hose nozzle blast of water might do it successfully but, in reality, I'm not sure. And, how would we know for sure unless we undertook a scientific study. So, if there's a Halle Berry looking gal with dreds out there that's willing to have bed bugs placed within her dreds I suppose the least I could do is take a shower with her to see what happens and then chekc to see if the bed bugs are removed via the shower too. Just sayin.

    5. Vomit ? Really ? Yeah, let's package that as the next efficacious bug spray product. We can call it, say; Vomitall - Kills Everything (even a good mood).

    6. Water? Yes, hot water.

    7. Lemon juice? (Where are you gettin this stuff; lemon juice?)

    8. Bleach ? Hmmm . . . At tleast they'd be cleaner.

    9. Shower v Packtite:
    Hmmm . . .

    OK, under normal conditions bed bugs would climb out of their harborage, feed on the host and go back to hiding. We would not expect them to actually harbor on the host. However, in extreme cases we have seen this occur but it is likely the minority of cases.

    Hope this helps ! paul b.

  4. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Feb 23 2013 12:53:04
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yeah. I know my questions were odd. I read that one story ages ago. Interesting about once they start feeding. I've read Mr Cain telling us not to sit on transit so I try to stand, move around etc. The fact that I sat down once and my pants got wet may also have something to do with it. I keep a washcloth and full change of clothes at work. Anyway I always thought since I moved around during the 15 minute ride I was fine.

    I read on this forum recently about someone puking on a harborage and it killing the bugs. They may have been joking. I also read about a nest in a ponytail but the experts have said they don't nest in hair unless you never wash it. And I read about bugs just coming off by the dozens in the shower but sounds like a loofa or washcloth is needed.

    Wow, I'd love to take you up on the shower experiment but I don't have dreaded or bugs. And I don't look like halls berry. It's more like Kate upton and I have a boyfriend that is a French model that I met on the internet (tv commercial reference)...because everything I read written by nameless strangers is true.

    But I wanted to ask an expert. Thanks

  5. P Bello

    oldtimer
    Joined: Nov '11
    Posts: 4,863

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Feb 23 2013 13:46:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Didn't bo derek have dreds in that movie 10 ?

  6. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Feb 23 2013 23:41:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi Paul,
    Bo Derek had cornrows in "10".

    Hair is kind of a touchy issue.

    Some people have hairstyles that don't get washed. You're probably familiar with older ladies who get their hair done -- perhaps even rinsed blue -- once a week (and sleeping in a cap the rest of the week). Extensions, weaves, dreadlocks, and there are more -- all of these may be washed rarely or not at all. This website recommends people wash "top quality" weaves once a week and average quality ones not at all.

    So these are quite legitimate questions and given that some of these styles may be more popular with African-Americans, dismissing the idea outright or talking about how "soap is available in the colonies" can have a racist undertone. I am sure you didn't intend anything like that, but it might come across that way. Suggesting people who don't wash their hair regularly smell bad is also not very nice once you consider these hairstyles.

    While we're told by experts that bed bugs don't like to be in people's hair, we've also had a few individuals with some of these styles here who claimed to have bed bugs in their hair, and it seems like it is plausible, since washing these hairdos with water may not be a frequent thing.

    So here are some reformulated questions:

    • Could bed bugs harbor (temporarily) in a hairstyle which is washed once a week?
    • Could bed bugs harbor in a hairstyle which is not washed for a month or two (here I am thinking weaves)?
    • Could bed bugs live in a hairstyle which is not combed or washed, but rinsed regularly (here I am thinking natural dreadlocks -- which grow for a very long time and might have areas which are quite matted and so difficult to thoroughly rinse)?

    I'm no hair expert, so I am sure others may be able to add some more relevant questions. Thanks for your input, Paul, and to other experts who may be able to add information and experience.

    And then we can have a FAQ on hair.

    Wheeeee!!!!!!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  7. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 0:07:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I wasn't really clear on my question either. I keep reading these accounts of some one getting out of bed, quickly running to the shower or bath.. and bugs just falling off as the water hits them. Really scary.

    And there was a home nurse...I felt so sorry for her..that talked about brushing them off her. She found a bug on some money in her pocket...I think.

    Anyway...I just thought if you guys didn't have your special suits, would you have hundreds on you at some of these places. Do they run toward you as you enter?

    And I have very dry hair and wash it with shampoo only twice a week. I have dry skin too and am often in the shower twice a day. Anyway, I had read about dreads and extensions etc could be an issue.

    I thought the colonies comment was related to Cain. I still remember reading Nacerima in multicultural anthroplogy.

  8. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 0:13:06
    #



    Login to Send PM


    hair by I woz ere, on Flickr


    Christy's hair weave by Baha'i Views / Flitzy Phoebie, on Flickr


    Dreadlocks at the BikeSwap by Derek Severson, on Flickr


    Dreadlocks by Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious, on Flickr


    Annie's dreadlocks by Valodzia X, on Flickr


    brandon's dreadlocks. by kylen.louanne, on Flickr

    I couldn't easily find a photo on flickr which was legal to share and which showed someone with a real long head of natural dreadlocks (Rastafarian style dreads, which never get cut).

    Perhaps marginally relevant -- but mainly I just came across this (tagged with "dreadlocks") and thought it was cute:


    dreadlocks by shaghaghi, on Flickr

  9. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 0:17:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    theyareoutthere - 8 minutes ago  » 
    I thought the colonies comment was related to Cain.

    I see your point and I retract my comment about that.

    I still think that suggesting people who don't wash their hair regularly smell bad is probably going to offend lots of folks. Again, as I said, I am sure Paul didn't intend that, but it's worth considering.

  10. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 0:25:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I agree. Paul is s guy so he may not understand HOW important hair is. It is an expression like fashion.

    Women used to only wash their hair once a week.

  11. EffeCi

    oldtimer
    Joined: Feb '09
    Posts: 1,938

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 5:04:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    In my experience, BBs do not like to walk on hair (or hairy surfaces) because their tarsi tend to snag on them. They tend to avoid hairy skin and generally do not harbor on stuffed animals if they're "furry".
    They won't bite you on head unless you're bald.

    Humans continuously move their heads and so hair to. BBs don't like to harbor in places that are submitted to continuous mechanical solicitations.

  12. RWhit

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '12
    Posts: 75

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 8:09:48
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The lady that cut's and colors my hair actually recommends that I only shampoo my hair every other day at the most. I know a few woman that go the no poo method. Here's some info about it.

    http://www.coderedhat.com/no-poo/

    But they just throw their hair up and still shower daily. Your scalp produces natural oil. Every time you shampoo you strip the natural oils out of your hair, if you shampoo to frequently your scalp actually starts over producing oil in return you have to shampoo even more.

    My friend says that only shampooing her hair once a week allows her to only get her hair cut once a year. It saves her a lot of money.

    Also, it takes us woman a long time to blow-dry, straighten, curl, fluff, and everything else involved to do our hair. So only having to do that every other day or less is awesome. My daughter has naturally curly hair, once a month I will flat iron it for her. It's a big treat for her, and she will use it as a 2-3 day hair style.

    I wish I could be one of those woman that only wash their hair every couple of days, I exercise to much though.. and if I didn't wash it everyday I would probably smell pretty bad lol.

    Anyway, all I'm trying to say is.. there are a lot of benefits to minimal and no shampooing.

    I also saw the documentary about the man staying in a hotel and filled the bath tub up with cold water and had bed bugs fall off him. Very scary.

    I also read somewhere about a lady that had bed bugs in her hair extensions. I can't remember the exact story, but I'm pretty sure I read it on this website.

    Bed bugs living in your hair? Oh man, I couldn't even imagine. Having them in your home is bad.. but actually on you?

    I hope the men from Duck Dynasty never get bed bugs, they might live in their giant hair and beards.

  13. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,243

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 9:09:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I believe that bed bugs could certainly stay in certain hair, especially that which is tied and twisted and dried out. That's not to say that they are down on the scalp in these situations, but on the dried hair. I have had them crawl over hairy parts of my arm and they don't seem bothered by the "forest", and will go to the skin surface to feed. Usually larger nymphs and adults are better at this.
    When bugs are feeding it is difficult to get them to let go by simply moving them with a brush; they are tenacious and stay there feeding. Of course, certain times they will let go and just try feeding again. And there are other times that certain bugs will disconnect and try another place on their own without any provocation from me. In a clump of feeding bugs (due to nature of feeding within a vial's opening on the arm), certain ones stop feeding and "bulldoze" their way to another site very close to the first. The bugs that have been pushed out of the way do not become disconnected and continue to feed. I even posted a picture on my site where after the bugs were feeding I moved my hand to change the gravitational pull and the bugs now were only connected by their impaled stylet fascicles and had no connection to my skin by their tarsi and still continued to feed. Some even held onto one another.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix go to the cimex acrobatics pictures.

    BTW, I had seen images of bed bugs harboring on the toenails of a patient. I believe this was a person who was homeless and his toenails had overgrown to form shelves upon which various bed bug nymphs, adults, eggs, waste material, were present. It was a multi-generational aggregation of a permanent nature.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  14. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 9:42:31
    #



    Login to Send PM

    TAOT,
    Changed title slightly to get at the specifics more-- which helps draw in the responses, I think. I hope that's agreeable to you!

  15. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 13:21:06
    #



    Login to Send PM

    That's fine nobugs. Someone sent me the link to the YouTube video with the man and the tub. My phone keeps stopping after a minute or two. It has an interview with Dr potter and a picture of a bald man with bites on his head. It talks about cases with thousands where people didn't know they had them.

    I wash my hair twice a week but I rinse it in cool water and condition it more often. I only blow dry my hair on winter.

    Thanks for all the expert input!

  16. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Feb 24 2013 22:31:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Speaking as a non-expert, of course, but I don't think it's necessarily an issue even if people are washing hair weekly. I am more concerned about a hairstyle which doesn't get washed that often (as is the case with some extensions, dreads, etc.)

    RWhit's article is written by someone using a "no poo" approach, but even she washed her hair every four days. (Yes, even if you use baking soda and vinegar, I'd count it as washing.)

  17. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Feb 25 2013 9:07:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    HEre is the link to the man who woke up at the hotel with bedbugs all over him and he went and filled a bathtub and the bedbugs floated up to the suface of the water. Thanks for the person who sent it to me!

    One of the things, even though Dr. Potter is interviewed, is that the whole Dramatization stuff was over the top. In addition, the guy at the hotel said he went back to the bed and slept well knowing there were no more bedbugs.

    This all started due to reading recent comments that sounded like the guy in the hotel (showering and seeing them wash down the drain and bedbugs nesting in ponytails) as well as sitting behind two clean, nice smelling young Caucasian men on the bus with very long dreadlocks. One of them was talking about how long they had been in but he would get rid of them for interviewing (assumed they were students). They then discussed that one of their mutual friends had ticks or lice or something of that nature in them last summer and it's too hot to wear in the summer (but I thought they were popular in very hot areas since you can tie them on top of your head). It does seem like dreads would "move less" than some other hair styles since I see them tied up a lot.

    I should have asked two sets of questions. I may try RWhit's hair article.

  18. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Feb 25 2013 12:40:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I don't see the link, TAOT?

  19. RWhit

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '12
    Posts: 75

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Feb 25 2013 13:20:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Nobugsonme - 14 hours ago  » 
    RWhit's article is written by someone using a "no poo" approach, but even she washed her hair every four days. (Yes, even if you use baking soda and vinegar, I'd count it as washing.)

    I count it as washing as well, vinegar is a natural cleanser and deodorizer. I have heard of some woman using dry mustard in place of the baking soda. The baking soda can at first leave your hair kind of "cotton candy" feeling I guess, the dry mustard doesn't? I personally have never done it though, so I'm not really sure. I would definitely give it a shot though, especially if you suffer from dry scalp.

    I have also heard of woman that do the "no poo" method going 2-3 months or even longer without "no pooing" and totally raving about it. I will take their word for it.

  20. theyareoutthere

    oldtimer
    Joined: Sep '11
    Posts: 3,255

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Feb 25 2013 14:41:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Here is a link to the documentary about the man with bed bugs all over him.

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Player

    It is kind of cheesy.

  21. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 22,265

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon Feb 25 2013 20:21:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, TAOT! Yes, I know that one -- it was uploaded the same day the Bedbugger blog was started.

    There is some odd stuff in there.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

296,803 posts in 50,043 topics over 155 months by 21,876 of 22,362 members. Latest: jnnafnlys01, simo7, Datnguyen