Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Free for all

Question:

(18 posts)
  1. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 1:32:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Do bedbugs have a natural enemy going after them? Or are they somehow immune to the animal kingdoms food chain? It seemed that humans are at the top of the food chain. Uhm. Wrong, guess again! It's bedbugs who reign supreme. UGH!

  2. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 1:38:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I mean, howcome people don't come together and protest at the White House, or Parliment etc. to make the government do something about this epidemic? Howcome the people in large cities like NYC aren't making a fuss, making TONS of noise about this? Howcome no one is doing anything!?

  3. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 1:48:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hmm. I guess if they had a natural enemy, it would be humans. (Naturally) But...?

  4. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 2:00:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I think I feel a conspiracy theory coming on! haha.

  5. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 2:35:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Do you recall how people with AIDS were treated? Or how people treat gays? I think having bedbugs is along those same lines. Isolated, ostrasized, singled out. Ring a bell?

  6. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 7:26:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Don't give in to the bed bugs. THEY'RE BUGS! We have to learn their weakness, which is our blood. We give them too much credit. WAY too much actually. Spending all sorts of money only to be infested again evokes a "fear" in us which in turn hands over power to them. (infestation, or, repeated infestation) which is unnecessary. I got angry earlier, and wanted to provoke those little a-holes. I sat on the couch and banged, thumped, whacked, anything to let them know that I was there. Yes, I felt them crawling on me, but I didn't get scared. I absolutely refuse to let bugs overrun my life. And I refuse to allow others to fuel my paranoia. I got up and sat down at the computer desk, and you know what? The "creepy crawlie" feeling stopped and I haven't felt it since. I think the bed bugs react to our emotions. It's in our blood. They thrive on fear, and why not? They ARE parasites after all. Are you really willing to put up with all the nonsense involved with a social stigma, and the people (PCO) who are ready and more than willing to take advantage of you? I'm not, and I won't. Sure, I may get bit again, but I won't be scared. Which I realize now is how they thrive. Buck the * up and take your life back. It's yours. It always was, and always will be.

  7. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 11,689

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 7:47:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    The use of natural enemies is a processed called biological control. Sadly few higher organisms will feed on bedbugs that don't have associated issues themselves. The most obvious as masked hunters who have a bite that is like a bee sting and spiders. Sadly spiders have a bad PR agency and people tend to be phobic of them.

    You also have the issue that so few of the previous widespread biological control systems actually worked. The sparrows imported to Australia to feed on the cactus eating caterpillars invaded the cities where food was less work to obtain.

    Its a valid question but its also a route that has been thought about a lot before and the closet we are likley to get is through the use of bacteria to attack the bedbugs at a cellular level but this is also not an idea which may will freely support.

    It just illustrates the massive difference between a good idea in the lab and a good idea in practice. When you have had almost a decade to think about the problem from all angles you realise its an incredible complex issue to address and there are no simple answers.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  8. lsdrg706

    member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 152

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 7:55:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed-bugscouk - 5 minutes ago  » 
    Hi,
    The use of natural enemies is a processed called biological control. Sadly few higher organisms will feed on bedbugs that don't have associated issues themselves. The most obvious as masked hunters who have a bite that is like a bee sting and spiders. Sadly spiders have a bad PR agency and people tend to be phobic of them.

    Bed Bugs Limited

    How about house centipedes? I realize the random centipede I find will never be able to eat them all, but heck I'm going to admit feeling at least slightly more comfortable knowing they are around to search and destroy when THEY get hungry.

  9. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:14:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    That's the thing about science. "Proof" where there is none to be found doesn't mean it isn't there. (Such as bedbugs) Right David?

  10. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 11,689

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:20:18
    #



    Login to Send PM

    lrb - 4 minutes ago  » 
    That's the thing about science. "Proof" where there is none to be found doesn't mean it isn't there. (Such as bedbugs) Right David?

    No sorry I cant actually make out what point you are trying to make, I have had my morning coffee so will rack it up to lost in translation. Please expand a little.

    David

  11. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 11,689

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:22:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    lsdrg706 - 25 minutes ago  » 
    How about house centipedes? I realize the random centipede I find will never be able to eat them all, but heck I'm going to admit feeling at least slightly more comfortable knowing they are around to search and destroy when THEY get hungry.

    Possibly but the issue is that you would need enough hungry centipedes with little or no other food source for it to be an effective strategy. Its simply not a viable idea although the odd spider and other predator should be moved rather than swatted as a pest, they are more likley to give emotional relief rather than being an actual weapon or active part of a control strategy.

    David

  12. lsdrg706

    member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 152

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:42:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed-bugscouk - 15 minutes ago  » 

    Possibly but the issue is that you would need enough hungry centipedes with little or no other food source for it to be an effective strategy. Its simply not a viable idea although the odd spider and other predator should be moved rather than swatted as a pest, they are more likley to give emotional relief rather than being an actual weapon or active part of a control strategy.
    David

    Oh, I don't disagree, I hope I am clear on that. I wouldn't want an actual population of centipedes living with me, nor do I think that a single one can kill a large enough infestation that leaves clues.

    I'm more or less speaking of after treatment (of which now I've had 2 chemical treatments done), or possibly prevention of establishment of bed bugs if one happens to seek harborage in a new place from an attached apartment unit.

    I suppose I'm just more inclined to let my randomly found centipedes that straggle in (maybe one every week or two at most) live, instead of evicting them by catching and releasing outside like I have done in the past.

  13. lrb

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 45

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:49:57
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Not everything is scientifically proven. Nor should it have to be. Nor do things that exist outside of a microscope. Bed bugs feed on human blood. Human blood carries everything that makes up the individual, including emotions. Do you know enough about bed bugs to determine that I am incorrect?

  14. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 11,689

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 8:54:56
    #



    Login to Send PM

    lsdrg706 - 8 minutes ago  » 
    Oh, I don't disagree, I hope I am clear on that. I wouldn't want an actual population of centipedes living with me, nor do I think that a single one can kill a large enough infestation that leaves clues.
    I'm more or less speaking of after treatment (of which now I've had 2 chemical treatments done), or possibly prevention of establishment of bed bugs if one happens to seek harborage in a new place from an attached apartment unit.
    I suppose I'm just more inclined to let my randomly found centipedes that straggle in (maybe one every week or two at most) live, instead of evicting them by catching and releasing outside like I have done in the past.

    I see your logic but that is actually why I developed the passives. If you detect at a single bedbug ingress you can resolve by replacing the monitor and lets face it nothing is ever faster than physical removal / resolution.

    Catch it quickly before it takes hold you and can avoid the massive issues that most people get themselves into when they first realise what the issue is.

    I did see recently that some cockroaches feed on bedbugs but I don't think we will have much business selling or renting out my colonies of Madagascan hissing roaches or deaths head flying roaches.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC as well as good business ethics I openly declare my vested interest in the passive monitors as the inventor and patent holder.

  15. lsdrg706

    member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 152

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri Nov 4 2011 9:01:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    True that David, I cannot deny the logic of fast detection. Maybe in an off sort of way I'm trying to convince myself that my random centipede visitors are friends, and that I don't find them nearly as hideous as I really do....lol. It's not their fault that they're ugly.

    And no, I definitely don't want any roaches. Eww.

  16. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 16,901

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat Nov 5 2011 1:22:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    We've discussed the centipede question before (click the "centipedes" tag above), and you may find those discussions interesting. There's even a FAQ.

    And we've also discussed various activism projects around bed bugs (see activism tag).

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  17. BugsMustDie

    member
    Joined: Aug '11
    Posts: 327

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat Nov 5 2011 9:35:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This is slightly on-topic, so for fun, I thought I would share.

    I found a spider in my bed last night. A huge, ugly spider. I sat there for quite awhile trying to figure out what to do with it. You see, I'm pretty sure (this morning anyway) my bedbugs are gone. But that spider could serve as a protector if I let him live in my bed. But....if he feels provoked by me, he may lash out at me in my sleep. For the most part, my "fear" of spiders has almost completely been erased since having bedbugs, and I often leave them alone when I find them in my house. But in my bed...that's where I draw the line. So I grabbed one of my handy Ziploc bags from my dresser drawer (because everyone keeps Ziplocs in their dresser, right?) and scooped the thing up. He was relocated outside my front door. I'm sure he'll invite himself back in, but I hope he doesn't decide to spin his web in my bed.

  18. lsdrg706

    member
    Joined: Oct '11
    Posts: 152

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Sat Nov 5 2011 9:39:33
    #



    Login to Send PM

    lol BugsMustDie, I think I would have run screaming from the room. I am one of those with a completely biased, paranoid fear of spiders. Yes, I know it's stupid but when I see a spider, oh it's got to go! I don't know why the centipede bothers me less, they are definitely ugly, maybe even uglier. But I admit, I do have more respect for both creatures now. Although...I also admit I was hoping the centipedes I house would be eating the spiders too!


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.