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Poor family, massive infection

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  1. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 13:21:31
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    Quick update:

    We've gotten our Cimexa supplies in. We're starting with 8oz of Cimexa, a respirator and 2 cartridges (the mask uses 2 at once, so one use). Since this is my first time using any chemicals like this, I'm not sure if it's plenty or if I'll be needing more. I'll update later about that part.

    We're waiting still on the passive monitors before we put down the Cimexa. Hopefully this week they'll be here. They've shipped, just not arrived yet.

    Decluttering is still going, but we still have one person unwilling to help. That really hits our energy and makes cleaning miserable. I think it's time to find a way to get him off the tv.... like hiding it in the attic while he's in the bath tonight....

    Since we have a single mask, I'll be doing most of the Cimexa myself. But, I may have to leave some to my wife while I'm away at work. For this, I'm going to use a washable marker to mark areas that need treated. That'll help streamline the process and make the respirator cartridges last longer.

    After use, the cartridges will go into a sealed Ziploc bag with the air pressed out. That should also help us get the most out of the two we have, keeping them as fresh as possible until we use them again.

    Notable sites for my reference (and others that are interested):
    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
    http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/tbypmr.pdf (PDF file. May prompt download)
    Http://www.bed-bugs.co.uk/ (David's company website.)
    Http://www.bedbugger.com/forum/
  2. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 15:31:15
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    Thanks for the update. Are you getting the monitors from David directly in the UK? I was wondering since the ones from US Bedbugs ships immediately. I hope the person who won't help will start cooperating. Also, I've seen youtubes of people with a year or two infestation and it was all over. What did you do to control yours up to this point so you could continue living in your place?

  3. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 17:10:40
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    Yes. They are coming directly from David's office.

    FayeState - 1 hour ago  » 
    I've seen youtubes of people with a year or two infestation and it was all over. What did you do to control yours up to this point so you could continue living in your place?

    Not much aside from squishing and flicking them away. At first we had tried using double sided tape, but I tested a square on the wall and found it ineffective. The bugs on the wall would rather just fall off the wall instead of trying to walk over it.

    For my youngest, we have her sleeping in a bouncy chair. They aren't able to climb the legs of it. We wash the fabric often, because the bugs like to climb the blanket or drop from the shelf above her. So she's not usually bitten too much.

    The infection is still pretty mild in the older kids' room, so we hadn't done much but wash the linens every week.

    For my wife and my bed, we really haven't been living. She sleeps through them for the most part, but I wake up when they bite. Usually that's every 5-10 minutes. We had kind of given up, thinking that a heat treatment or some chemical spray by a PCO was the only way out, but we couldn't afford it.

    We don't allow guests in. We have to tell them that the house isn't clean or something so they can't come over. And we only really make brief visits to friends every now and then. The only exception is my mother's house, because they have a ranch and we can have the kids run around outside and not spread it ourselves.

    I can maybe take a few pictures to show what sine of it looks like. I took a little time examining a few places at night a few days ago, to see what the swarms looked like in full force... they're pretty ballsy at night and walk around like they own the place.... and for the most part, they have owned the place... For several years. That's going to change very soon.

  4. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 19:20:52
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    What times are the swams out?

  5. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 20:41:38
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    Usually at night. Maybe around 10 or so and throughout the night. I don't usually stay up looking to see when they leave, but I know they aren't all over when I get up around 6 or so. There's always a constant wave of them walking around, but nothing like at night.

  6. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 21:05:27
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    Where in your house were the swarms? How do you function on no sleep?

  7. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 22:20:16
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    The living room recliner was a major shock when I first saw it night. My father-in-law was in the hospital for a while, and I tried to turn off the tv. The remote was by his recliner and I saw the swarms there first. It was the area that they first came into the house, and he hardly ever leaves the chair. So, it's basically a perfect feeding ground for them. The pictures that Lou shared about the folded paper look mild compared to what I saw that night on this chair.

    My youngest's play pin was a big issue that I didn't notice quickly. It has a pad that rests on top of a mesh piece to raise the baby to waist height, instead of ankle height. She was using this as a bed and we had to change that, simply because the swarms at night looked like they might just swallow her whole if we had left it. Now she's in a bouncy with legs that they can't climb.

    My bedroom floor is bad night, too. They try to hide in the play pin, I believe, and walk across the floor to my bed to feed.

    FayeState - 15 minutes ago  »  How do you function on no sleep?

    .......I have ADHD.......

  8. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 22:42:54
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    It's be nice when it is over - everyone is interested in hearing how it goes - any estimates on time?

  9. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 22:51:20
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    Hopefully a few weeks will see a significant decrease. I don't know how long it'll take altogether, though.

  10. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 22:54:56
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    Good luck and keep us posted with it.

  11. Freaked Fighter

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 23:17:37
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    I'm not an expert but I was in a situation that required TbyPMR and it works just fine. I did use a little Cimexa, too. At one point I thought they were in the wall, so down it came, with no BB sign. I used a lot (about 3 Tbsp) of Cimexa between the walls before I put them back together. Good thing, too. I got BB again about 8 months later. But because I had the Passive Monitors up to alert me they were back and the Cimexa between the walls which would have been their way to me, I only had them 3 weeks.
    You will need very little Cimexa. In fact, too much can be a bad thing.
    Good Luck and keep us posted.
    Keep up the hard work and it will be over before you know it.

  12. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 23:27:03
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    Are your monitor's David's monitors? What is TbyPMR?

  13. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 23:32:50
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    "Treatment by Passive Monitor Replacement"

    It's David's way of treating by just replacing monitors with the bugs in them. It's the method I've outlined and will be following.

  14. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Dec 20 2016 23:35:13
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    Freaked,
    Could you have used heat instead of knocking down the wall?

  15. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Wed Dec 21 2016 5:13:38
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    I don't believe heat treatments get into the walls, which is why nobody recommends using foggers, as they can spread the infestation into the walls.

    Freaked Fighter - 5 hours ago  » 
    I'm not an expert but I was in a situation that required TbyPMR and it works just fine. I did use a little Cimexa, too.
    (Cut out bulk because I'm getting tired of scrolling through my long posts. XD )
    Good Luck and keep us posted.
    Keep up the hard work and it will be over before you know it.

    Thank you for the encouragement! It's especially helpful because you're using the same treatment I'll be using. It really does help to hear (err... read?) the success stories and the support from everyone here. I came expecting a few nasty words because of how long this had been going on and maybe a couple tidbits of advice. I've have gotten so much more than I ever expected. Really. Thank you for your post.

    I am curious though. Your experience might give me some insight of what's to come during the endgame. If you don't mind, I've got a few questions. If you can't answer any, that's fine. Most of it's simply curiosity.

    After the 8 months without bugs, so you think it was because you missed some, or that they got brought in on your things/came in from a neighboring house?

    Did you see any signs that you had them before you started treating again, or did you just look at the monitor and notice it was active again?

    How easy was it to get rid of the secondary infestation? Did you apply more Cimexa, or simply replace monitors until they were removed entirely?

    loubugs - 4 days ago  » 
    I rear thousands of bed bugs, some in larger 8 oz containers and some in small vials...

    Wait.......... I realize this was several posts back and on a different page.... but something was bugging me (dadum tissss) and it's only just now that I've realized what was bugging me, as I wake up from one biting me..... how do you feed them???? Have you ever seen the "Blade" trilogy? Because their human farm is what's running through my mind right now. Humor aside, I AM curious how you feed them. And also curious how you keep them from hitching a ride home with you. It doesn't make you a bit nervous, knowing they cause so many people such grief, yet here they are in front if you?

  16. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Wed Dec 21 2016 22:10:18
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    Update: day zero coming soon!

    We have everything on hand now to begin treatment. I'm going to hold on to begin treating, though. For a couple reasons...

    First, I want to make sure that EVERY room is 100% ready for treatment. I don't have a lot of supplies, probably just enough. If I get started on a couple rooms now, but don't start on the others until they're ready, the untreated rooms will just end up moving into the treated rooms. We're going to give one big push all at once with the monitors and Cimexa.

    Secondly, I have to find a time when I can get everyone out of the house for a few hours. It's pretty hard to isolate three kids, and I don't want them running through my freshly treated rooms breathing it all in.

    So, that's the update for now. Good news, I've everything I need to begin treatment. Bad news, I have to put up with them just a little bit longer.

    I'll make sure to do updates as more happens and keep as detailed a log as I can. I'll post another update on day zero, to show the outlive of what was done and again on day one, to outline how the bugs seem to be reacting.

  17. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Wed Dec 21 2016 22:23:52
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    So you have the monitors and everything - that's great. Anxious to hear how it goes.

  18. loubugs

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 9:01:23
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    yohoki - 1 day ago  » 

    loubugs - 4 days ago  » 
    I rear thousands of bed bugs, some in larger 8 oz containers and some in small vials...

    Wait.......... I realize this was several posts back and on a different page.... but something was bugging me (dadum tissss) and it's only just now that I've realized what was bugging me, as I wake up from one biting me..... how do you feed them???? Have you ever seen the "Blade" trilogy? Because their human farm is what's running through my mind right now. Humor aside, I AM curious how you feed them. And also curious how you keep them from hitching a ride home with you. It doesn't make you a bit nervous, knowing they cause so many people such grief, yet here they are in front if you?

    The large jars have a fine mesh screen of around 1/2 to 1/3 mm openings. I just invert the jar on my arm. I feed for around 30 minutes. There can be a few thousand bugs in the jars. Sometimes I remove the jar and shift the contents of it around and place back on for continued feeding. This gets more bugs to the screening and feeding since they have to start over. These jars have to be opened occasionally to get bugs out. During this process, the jar is in a glass planter (around 10 inch diameter, 4-6 inches high) and this is in a clear plastic storage box that's around 6 inches high. I use small artist paint brushes to move them around and a thicker small artist brush to brush them off the lid screening and back into the jar. Bug are moved into vials and live on folded paper. Folded graph paper strips held with forceps and placed on the folded cardboard in the jars and bugs crawl on. I then move to vials that are waiting in the glass planter and cap them. Caps have 4 slits for air. While the jars have a few thousand bugs, the vials usually have less than 60 bugs. The caps on these are popped off and vial inverted on skin for feeding, usually on fleshy section of hand between forefinger and thumb. No hair and easy to monitor. The vial is left there around 10 minutes or less, usually in horizontal position, but sometimes with its bottom up. Move hand so vial top is up and slide vial around to get the bugs to fall back into vial in order to remove from skin. Cap it again. Vials are clear plastic. I work over the plastic storage box. Boxes are covered when not being used and kept on a small table in my office downstairs. Box lids not anchored tightly to allow air flow. Jars lids have tape around fastened to top of jar circumference. I work on the kitchen table with a view out the bay window to the back yard. Wear T shirt, no sleeves. They don't have to hitch a ride home - they're already there. Some of these items are pictured here https://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  19. CleaningToDeath

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 10:28:02
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    Yohoki,

    I would just like to say, I admire your courage when you came to the forum (worried about the CPS in the past). I admire you taking on such a monumental task, yet you are witty and humorous in some of your posts (the door to door salesman was my favorite) while dealing with infestation. You have such an optimistic outlook, that in light of what you have been dealing with for so long, made mine currently pale in comparison, and actually relaxed my nerves a bit. I had to think of what your family has been going through for years, and remain positive, where most people would have thrown in the towel long ago. You possess a rare trait not shown on the forums much, hope and optimism. Your posts have made me less apprehensive and I will just deal with this one day at a time. I thank you for coming to the forums, sharing your story, and enjoy reading the details of your plans, and progress. Thank you.

  20. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 14:27:43
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    Lou,
    I take it you don't react to bites - correct?

  21. loubugs

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 15:05:15
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    FayeState - 33 minutes ago  » 
    Lou,
    I take it you don't react to bites - correct?

    It varies from raised bump for a single bite to large, raised welt for multiple bites. The single bite reaction subsides in an hour. Multiple ones take days to weeks, but the reddish and later red/brown coloration remains for months. Itching really doesn't occur although tenderness is there from so many hundreds to thousands of stylets piercing. Look at some pictures of the bite reactions and click onthem to read the legends for explanation. https://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix

  22. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 16:03:47
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    Thanks - so seems since must feed regularly must always have stuff.

  23. loubugs

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 16:24:48
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    FayeState - 19 minutes ago  » 
    Thanks - so seems since must feed regularly must always have stuff.

    Not sure what you mean. I don't feed them regularly. I try to keep that part of my house cool mid 60s, but summer hits mid 70s.

  24. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 18:29:20
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    Thought you had to feed regularly.

  25. bedbugsbugme

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 18:51:31
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    From what I've read so far is they can last for months in cooler temps because their metabolism slows down, right loubugs? Too bad you couldn't just put some blood in a trough and they could suck it up from there LOL

    I'm not an expert. Just sharing what I learned from my experience.
  26. bedbugsbugme

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 18:53:59
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    Would keeping your specimins in a not so cold refrigerator work loubugs? Wouldn't that slow them down to dormancy?

  27. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 19:06:31
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    Yohoki,
    Do you have any idea when you may be starting the treatment?

  28. loubugs

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 19:20:11
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    bedbugsbugme - 24 minutes ago  » 
    Would keeping your specimins in a not so cold refrigerator work loubugs? Wouldn't that slow them down to dormancy?

    I know some handlers do this, but I feel it's too cold. Then more stressful to have temps rollercoaster like that because they're taken out to be used for canine detection.

  29. loubugs

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 19:22:26
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    FayeState - 51 minutes ago  » 
    Thought you had to feed regularly.

    No. They can regularly feed but they are adapted to go long periods without blood meal and keeping them cool is good for keeping them around with less activity. I sort of have a cool-adapted population.

  30. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 20:41:04
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    Thanks.

  31. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Dec 22 2016 23:17:09
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    loubugs - 13 hours ago  » ... I just invert the jar on my arm. I feed for around 30 minutes. There can be a few thousand bugs in the jars. Sometimes I remove the jar and shift the contents of it around and place back on for continued feeding. This gets more bugs to the screening and feeding since they have to start over. These jars have to be opened occasionally to get bugs out. ... Some of these items are pictured here https://www.flickr.com/photos/lou_bugs_pix

    (Post shortened because reasons)

    My god! I'm not sure if that's the coolest or most disturbing thing I've ever heard! You don't have to feed them very often though, do you? You can just keep them in hibernation, or cool temperatures so they eat less? Thank you for sharing that interesting/weird information!

    Edit: as I read further, I noticed you already explained the temp.

    CleaningToDeath - 12 hours ago  » 
    Yohoki,
    I would just like to say, I admire your courage when you came to the forum (worried about the CPS in the past). I admire you taking on such a monumental task, yet you are witty and humorous in some of your posts (the door to door salesman was my favorite) while dealing with infestation. You have such an optimistic outlook, that in light of what you have been dealing with for so long, made mine currently pale in comparison, and actually relaxed my nerves a bit. I had to think of what your family has been going through for years, and remain positive, where most people would have thrown in the towel long ago. You possess a rare trait not shown on the forums much, hope and optimism. Your posts have made me less apprehensive and I will just deal with this one day at a time. I thank you for coming to the forums, sharing your story, and enjoy reading the details of your plans, and progress. Thank you.

    Thank you! And I'm glad I can help you feel better! This definitely isn't a situation that anyone should be happy about, even on a small scale. I don't think anyone is particularly happy to have bed bugs... except maybe Lou... I'm not too sure on this guy. :p But, I have to put a little humor in here and there, just to keep my own sanity.

    And you're absolutely right. We're going to fix our problem here one day at a time, and you defiantly should, too! This forum completely changed my attitude, and we're working every day to make sure we get the house clear of bugs. Just one day at a time. And soon we'll be living our lives completely differently.

    Hopefully you will, too! Good luck on your own treatment! I hope it goes well!

    FayeState - 3 hours ago  » 
    Yohoki,
    Do you have any idea when you may be starting the treatment?

    I think the best time will be next Wednesday. My family usually goes to church in the evening on Wednesdays. I can send everyone up and stay at home. That gives me a couple hours to do the main areas, like the living room and the kids' bedroom.

    When the family gets back, it's bath and bedtime for the kids. During this time I can send my wife and her father to the living room while I treat the other two bedrooms and the car. Then, I just sit with the wife have a nice cold pint, and wait for all of this to blow over. How's that for a slice of fried gold? (Badly implemented "Shaun of the Dead" quote)

  32. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Fri Dec 23 2016 1:02:28
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    Sounds good, so that will be when you put in the monitors? How many monitors do you have for this?

  33. yohoki

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Fri Dec 23 2016 4:30:35
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    I have about a dozen. I'll have to be picky about when I replace my monitors, because I don't have enough to replace them all very frequently. Vacuuming will help, though. It's probably how I'll be removing the bulk of their numbers, since I simply can't replace the monitors over and over.

    Probably the most effective way I can think of to get the most bugs out is to vacuum at night. It's going to about people, but they'll just have to deal with it for a night or two here and there. So, I guess I'll talk about how I plan to vacuum. Mainly the locations I'll be vacuuming, and how I decided those locations.

    I know for certain that a good swarm of them covers our recliner at night, because my father-in-law uses it as his bed these days. That's a good place to start. When he was gone for a few nights, I recall seeing maybe twenty adults crawling across the seat. For each of those adults, there were countless more nymphs of every stage. I know that's going to be a big area that'll significantly lower their numbers if I vacuum it often and thoroughly.

    Another area WAS the play pin, but it's not quite as covered as it used to be. Since having the baby's bed in a way that they can't reach it, the numbers have dwindled significantly on the play pin. Isolating the baby bed has scattered the bugs away from this area as they try to find a new source of food. I'll need to see where they've gone. It may simply be that they've moved to my own bed, in the same room.

    The kids' room is kinda weird... I see fecal on the slats for the bed, but no eggs and no bugs nearby. Maybe they're inside the mattress? It is torn in places from them jumping on the bed. More thorough searching needed. I did try using a flashlight while they slept, but only saw a few lone bugs, completely contrasted to what other rooms had.

    My own bed is going to be a bit difficult. We don't have much room to move furniture around, because the room is tiny, plus the baby's bed is in there. I'm sure there's a large number in/around my own bed, simply because of the frequency of bites while in it. But because of the size of the room, it's hard to see where they're coming from. I know they attack more from the head of the bed than the feet, so I may be able to just lift that side up and vacuum with the hose on that side. Hopefully I'll see a full container in my vacuum that I can expose to a number of very evil and probably very deadly, experiments. *clashing of thunder, evil scientist laughter*

    The unused room...... We aren't quite sure how to tackle this one.... it was used by my in-laws until my MiL passed a few years back. We did have BBs at the time, and it's evident by the fecal stains on the walls Where there was once an alarm clock pressed up against the wall, you can see it's outline. The infestation was once very bad in this room. But, it's been used for little more than storage since she passed. We've been putting our cleaned clothes in sealed bags here, but I'm going to need to move them, and the rest of the storage, so that I can check the was more closely. I don't think there's an active population in this room except in the dresser. That's the only area that we actively use.

    The bugs also hide in weird, out of place areas that will be difficult to find. Like my camera case that I hang on my closet in the foyer. We don't really use the closet for anything, and I hardly ever use my camera bag, simply picking up the camera instead. But it's covered in bugs regardless... they love the damn thing.... I clean them off every now and then only to find another swarm cowering in the crevices the next time I look at it. I'm sure there's dozens of odd hiding places like this throughout the house that we'll have to find.

    Thankfully, decluttering has removed a bunch of those weird hiding places to begin with. And removing most of our clothes from the equation is going to give them even fewer places to hide.

    But, my post is getting longer and longer and it's getting later and later... so I'll end this one here and have a stroll around the house with my flashlight to scope out the enemy territory.

  34. FayeState

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    Posted 5 months ago
    Fri Dec 23 2016 5:07:23
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    You seem to have it under control. That's a good idea as to vacuuming at night - never thought of it.

  35. yohoki

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    Posted 4 months ago
    Wed Jan 4 2017 13:40:46
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    Last Wednesday, there was no church, so I wasn't able to go through with the plan that night. We do have it tonight, though. We're starting tonight! The beginning of the end is near!

    I've been noticing some changes, already, though.

    About a week after changing my youngest's sleeping area, the bugs have moved out of that area and I noticed a very dramatic raise in activity on my own bed. It was horrible. But, the baby wasn't being bit.

    Now, after clearing and vacuuming the area between our two beds, the bugs are less active. I'm able to sleep through the night, only being woken once or twice. A very different situation from what I was experiencing.

    We also decided to move the recliner slightly, and clean underneath it. The floor had what looked like a pile of sand, shed skins covered the floor visibly. After vacuuming that up, and inside the recliner, hopefully the in-law's area will be getting less activity.

    It's taken a lot of work, and a ton of vacuuming every day, but it's really been improving recently. I'm really excited to see the Cimexa go down tonight and see what effect it has.

  36. FayeState

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    Glad it's improving - please keep us posted.

  37. bed-bugscouk

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    Wed Jan 4 2017 14:48:46
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    Thanks for the feedback below:

    Freaked Fighter - 2 weeks ago  » 
    I'm not an expert but I was in a situation that required TbyPMR and it works just fine. I did use a little Cimexa, too. At one point I thought they were in the wall, so down it came, with no BB sign. I used a lot (about 3 Tbsp) of Cimexa between the walls before I put them back together. Good thing, too. I got BB again about 8 months later. But because I had the Passive Monitors up to alert me they were back and the Cimexa between the walls which would have been their way to me, I only had them 3 weeks.
    You will need very little Cimexa. In fact, too much can be a bad thing.
    Good Luck and keep us posted.
    Keep up the hard work and it will be over before you know it.

    It really helps people to understand that bed bugs does not have to be the nightmare it can be painted as. I spent a while on the phone the other night helping someone to understand that many of the nightmares that we read about could have easily been prevented and avoided. In some cases reading about them can set people on the wrong path and they make their lives too complex in the quest for a magic bullet when there are simple solutions.

    Please would you consider leaving some comments and feedback on social media so that others can find this information sooner.

    David

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  38. yohoki

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    The deed is done.... all that's left is to sit down and watch tv for a little with a gas mask on like I survived a nuclear holocaust, or something. I feel such a relief. I have plenty of dust left, so I can do this again next week, to replace any dust I might vacuum up.

    I also plucked a few into a small plastic vial to watch.... a pinch of Cimexa inside ought to give us some satisfaction...

    I also placed several monitors in the active bedrooms, but not in the unused room. I still treated there, because there's no reason not too, but didn't feel the need to waste a monitor yet.

    So, this is my Day Zero report!

    Day Zero - 1-4-16

    Treated every room with Cimexa.

    Applied monitors on every used bed.

    Activity levels vary by room.

    Living room- recliner still heavily infested, as well as floor and wall behind it. No noticeable change from normal. Treated entire room with Cimexa. Applied monitor to foot rest.

    Kids' bedroom- very little activity. I had placed a monitor here about a 2 weeks early. Still no signs on monitor. Bed slats show signs of previous infestation, but only fecal. No eggs, no live bugs. Treated bed frames and base boards. Left monitor in place.

    My bedroom-
    Activity level was medium, compared to what it has been, since removing clutter and vacuuming frequently. Treated bed and frame. Treated play pin's corners and underside, also under pad. Many active harborages on mattress and box spring. Added monitor on box spring and play pin's side touching wall. Treated behind furniture and wall items (mirror, etc.).

  39. CleaningToDeath

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    Wed Jan 4 2017 19:37:43
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    Looking forward to your updates when you soon will state, I'm seeing so many dead bed bugs!

  40. fed-up-mama

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    Can't wait to see how the monitors work...thinking I need to use this method myself.

  41. yohoki

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    CleaningToDeath - 41 minutes ago  » 
    Looking forward to your updates when you soon will state, I'm seeing so many dead bed bugs!

    You and me both! I'm looking forward to not having to wake up in the middle of the night! Or to not have to clean my shoes every morning. Or to be able to use my laptop without feeling like bugs are just pouring out of it.... it already feels like that time is only a short few days away.

    fed-up-mama - 19 minutes ago  » 
    Can't wait to see how the monitors work...thinking I need to use this method myself.

    They're actually very simple. Being very curious, I just had to open one up to see what was going on... I won't give exact details, because it's David's product and don't wanna draw business from him. But basically, it's a line of small tubes that are just the right size for bugs to crawl into and be nice and cozy. I haven't seen any yet on the one I've had placed for a few weeks, but I don't believe the bugs are really in that room much. The three I placed today, however, I expect to be covered soon.

  42. FayeState

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    Congratulations. So if I understand correctly, the only chemical you're using is Cimexa - correct? I can't wait to hear about the monitors. So the Cimexa and the monitors and the cleaning and decluttering should give you a bed bug-free life? Sure hope that is soon. When will the dust settle enough for your family to reenter?

  43. yohoki

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    Yes. That's correct. No other chemicals but Cimexa. As for the time limit, they needed to wait a couple hours for the dust to settle. By the time they got done with dinner, service and classes the dust had cleared.

  44. FayeState

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    Thu Jan 5 2017 1:41:08
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    How often does David want you to check the monitors?

  45. FayeState

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    What kind of cleaning did David have you do? Did he have you bag all your stuff?

  46. bed-bugscouk

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    Hi,

    Can I please request that we allow the OP to focus on the task at hand. We have all agreed to share the resources at the conclusion of the process in a way that will help others.

    Much of the basics is already online as TbyPMR and the kits we have developed.

    Ultimately we need to allow space and time to put things into practice rather than tying up time with less productive issues. The correct time to share will come and in the meantime others have confirmed the approach has worked for them.

    David

  47. yohoki

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    Day one report: 1-5-16

    Few bugs seen in bedroom. A few adults, but mainly stage 1 nymphs. I suspect that the dust is already affecting the later stages, and the nymphs coming straight from the eggs are not yet effected. Consulting my little jar of critters, all that I captured are dead from the dust I put in. It seems the Cimexa acts quickly after direct contact. To be fair, though, I DID roll the bugs around in it a lot. Regardless, I'm sure the others at least feel dehydrated, if not already dead. I'm very happy with this experiment.

    The camera case has almost no live bugs on the side I sprayed (I didn't want to accidentally spray inside the camera... it's hard to clean). But the other side does still have a very live population. I'm not sure if they've moved, or simply died on that side. Regardless, there's definitely instant improvement anywhere the dust was placed.

    I wasn't able to check the recliner today, and it's too late to bother my in-law by shining a flashlight while he's trying to sleep. I suspect it's a similar story. I think I spent the most time carefully applying dust in every area of that chair and around it. Hopefully he is already feeling a difference.

    FayeState - 1 day ago  » 
    How often does David want you to check the monitors?

    Not often. The bugs like to live in areas that are away from human activity. If I check them too often, they may not move into them. Once a week or two should be fine. I'll check them next Wednesday and note any changes.

    FayeState - 1 day ago  » 
    What kind of cleaning did David have you do? Did he have you bag all your stuff?

    I did bag my clothes. We've kept about a week's worth of clothing out of bags that we're wearing. Other than that, all clothing is bagged.

    I didn't bag anything else, but we did pick things up around the house. Three very young kids... lots of stuffed toys... you get the picture.... they like to leave toys around. That's all been picked up, as well as other various clutter from the rest of us.

    We've also been vacuuming much more often. Almost daily.

    bed-bugscouk - 20 hours ago  » 
    Hi,
    Can I please request that we allow the OP to focus on the task at hand. We have all agreed to share the resources at the conclusion of the process in a way that will help others.
    Much of the basics is already online as TbyPMR and the kits we have developed.
    Ultimately we need to allow space and time to put things into practice rather than tying up time with less productive issues. The correct time to share will come and in the meantime others have confirmed the approach has worked for them.
    David

    David's probably right here. I'll most likely be less active on the forum for some time while this is going. I'll be checking in and trying to answer questions if I'm able to, but I get the feeling he wants me to concentrate on the treatment. Or that I talk too much. :p

    I may just update every week, to say what's been done and what changes I'm noticing. I don't expect dramatic changes every day, so there's no need to post every day about the little things.

  48. CleaningToDeath

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    That is promising news! Don't expect you to answer. Although kind of perplexed that nymphs wouldn't be the first to die or stand a chance at all. Of course we all want the larger stages and adults instantly gone! Glad to hear 24 hours has already made a significant difference.

  49. CaliWife

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    yohoki - 3 weeks ago  » 
    So the strong pungent smell is their pheromones? I didn't know we could actually smell it. I'll sometimes smell a really strong foul smell when I try to squish one and thought it was just the blood, etc. Is this the pheromones I'm smelling?

    Bless you for what you are going through and your perseverance! I am a basket case and I have yet to really even see a bug. Have a question, you don't have an odor in the home? I have this pretty strong "musty" odor, mostly in the living room. I was attributing the odor to the bugs odor they give off.

  50. fed-up-mama

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    Posted 4 months ago
    Sat Jan 7 2017 13:22:13
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    Great news! Can't wait to hear you are BB free and about how well the bugs are taking to those monitors.

  51. bed-bugscouk

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    Sat Jan 7 2017 14:40:12
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    Hi,

    There are a few smells associated with bed bugs from the pheromones which they use to communicate with each other through to the smell associated with the build up of their waste.

    Its not common for people without extensive exposure to be able to smell it when there is a significant infestation and I have known 2 people who are able to accurately scent detect down to a single bed bug in a room with no air flow.

    The main reason why people tend not to notice it in their own homes is that they acclimatize to it and thus don't detect its build up.

    If you have followed the inspection video routines and cant find signs its extremely unlikely the smell you detect is connected with bed bugs.

    Hope hat helps.

    David

  52. CaliWife

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    bed-bugscouk - 1 hour ago  » 
    Hi,
    There are a few smells associated with bed bugs from the pheromones which they use to communicate with each other through to the smell associated with the build up of their waste.
    Its not common for people without extensive exposure to be able to smell it when there is a significant infestation and I have known 2 people who are able to accurately scent detect down to a single bed bug in a room with no air flow.
    The main reason why people tend not to notice it in their own homes is that they acclimatize to it and thus don't detect its build up.
    If you have followed the inspection video routines and cant find signs its extremely unlikely the smell you detect is connected with bed bugs.
    Hope hat helps.
    David

    Well I have not seen the videos (I will go look for them now), but we tore the bottoms off the box springs and couch and looked with flashlight and magnifying glass. Also looked all through wooden furniture near beds and couches. Tossed most of it just to be sure. You have been helping out so many. Thank you so much!!!

  53. Poiqm

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    Posted 4 months ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 5:16:56
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    Am I the only one who thinks it is counter intuitive to use passive monitors to provide a harborage while using Cimexa?

    Yohoki, you can drape 4 mil plastic sheeting over your beds to prevent bites and sleep on top of it, just don't let it touch the floor or walls. You will still be "bait" but you won't be dinner. You can also drape it over the chair to protect the elderly person while he's sleeping.

    Read this study about Cimexa and have faith that it will work if applied correctly.
    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/

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  54. yohoki

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    Posted 4 months ago
    Mon Jan 9 2017 11:21:39
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    CleaningToDeath - 3 days ago  » 
    That is promising news! Don't expect you to answer. Although kind of perplexed that nymphs wouldn't be the first to die or stand a chance at all. Of course we all want the larger stages and adults instantly gone! Glad to hear 24 hours has already made a significant difference.

    I really only had a small respite that night. For some reason it was only the little ones, but the next night it was back to normal unfortunately. There's still a difference from before, but it's not as dramatic as the first night. I'm not sure why all the older bugs decided to disappear for a night. Kinda wish they would more often!

    CaliWife - 2 days ago  » 
    Bless you for what you are going through and your perseverance! I am a basket case and I have yet to really even see a bug. Have a question, you don't have an odor in the home? I have this pretty strong "musty" odor, mostly in the living room. I was attributing the odor to the bugs odor they give off.

    I haven't noticed any smells. But I can't say there isn't one. They build up gradually over time, and so does the scent. Some one else that's not used to the smell might notice it if they came in, but we seem to have adjusted to it and don't notice it. I don't recall ever noticing any scents that I can attribute to the bugs.

    fed-up-mama - 1 day ago  » 
    Great news! Can't wait to hear you are BB free and about how well the bugs are taking to those monitors.

    I'm mentally preparing myself to see the monitors.... I don't know how they look right now... if you've ever seen a swarm of bees, where they just engulf everything.... That's what I imagine when I think about the monitors. I'm not going to be excited to look at them Wednesday, I'm actually kinda freaked out. XD

  55. bed-bugscouk

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    Poiqm - 1 day ago  » 
    Am I the only one who thinks it is counter intuitive to use passive monitors to provide a harborage while using Cimexa?

    Probably not but then again a lot of people felt the world was flat for a very long time.

    See I read that statement and think it sounds like "since the test always works why provide a QC". The reality is that no matter how good a desiccant is its not really feasible to apply it in all the places that bed bugs could / would travel, many of these being very close to the food source (bed) so the Passive Monitors become an additional line of defense.

    I would also have more faith in a research paper than an article in a trade magazine. Especially one that has published some shockingly inaccurate information with regards bed bugs in the past.

    Since about 2012 we have used Passive Monitors in very case we work and many cases which are inspection only (not bed bugs) simply because it is the most efficient approach we can take. It also increases the likelihood that the person who had bed bugs follows the best practices we set out in terms of monthly inspection and many detect and resolve future introductions through the TbyPMR approach.

    I think cimexa is a great tool and its part of the solution for those who have access to it but equally it is not the silver bullet cure-all that some may be tempted to claim.

    David

  56. yohoki

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    Wed Jan 11 2017 20:22:34
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    Poiqm - 2 days ago  » 
    Am I the only one who thinks it is counter intuitive to use passive monitors to provide a harborage while using Cimexa?
    Yohoki, you can drape 4 mil plastic sheeting over your beds to prevent bites and sleep on top of it, just don't let it touch the floor or walls. You will still be "bait" but you won't be dinner. You can also drape it over the chair to protect the elderly person while he's sleeping.
    Read this study about Cimexa and have faith that it will work if applied correctly.
    http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/

    I also replied to Poiqm in a PM, but I felt that part of my response needed to go here for future readers.

    The reason the Passive Monitors work right now is because they've been placed in an area where the bugs already move around. Since they live, feed and walk around the bed, it's logical that the monitor should go there. Simple enough.

    If I were to drape plastic on the beds however, there'd be no reason for the bugs to live there and they might scatter to other places, like the corners of my ceiling where they can drop down onto the bed. Now, not only do I have to place monitors on the bed, but also the walls near the ceiling and anywhere else they've moved to. I've made it harder to treat the infection, and possibly also infested my kids' room next door since I've spread it.

    Another reason I thought CImexa/Monitor combo wasn't counter intuitive is because Cimexa isn't a repellent. If I had been advised to use monitors with another chemical, such as alcohol, it would not have worked since alcohol repels the bugs and would cause them to move to other areas instead of to the monitor.

    Now for the reason I logged on today! Week 2 Report - 1/11/17 (omg, it's 2017, isn't it? I'm still trying to write 2015....)

    Today's treatment was cut a little short... the washer decided it wanted to flood the kitchen while I was dusting....

    Second treatment went well in the areas I WAS able to get done. Vacuumed a lot of bugs out of living room recliner and reapplied dust. Also changed out the monitor... it was not nearly as scary as I was imagining it would be.... the gloves helped, though.... Still seeing many bugs huddled up in the various tufts and folds of the fabric. I didn't have time to take it all apart and dust/vacuum inside again. After the flood, there would not be enough time before the family got back for the dust to settle.

    Children's bedroom was dusted again. Monitor shows no activity still. This is a good thing, here. It means we haven't spread the infection into their room during the treatment. Seeing any activity on this monitor is a bad thing. Success!

    Bedroom got a similar treatment. The monitor here didn't show any signs of bugs, however. Not at all what I was expecting. Placed another in a different area on the box spring. Vacuumed and dusted again.

    Playpin monitor also clean. Wasn't able to vacuum. Had to hastily apply more cimexa to allow time to settle. I'm not sure if the clean monitor here is a success or not. They are probably avoiding this area at the moment, as the food isn't easy to get to. For the time being, I'll consider it a good thing.

  57. FayeState

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    Thu Jan 12 2017 1:37:48
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    Thanks for the report.

  58. Poiqm

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    The reality is that no matter how good a desiccant is its not really feasible to apply it in all the places that bed bugs could / would travel, many of these being very close to the food source (bed)

    That's interesting because the instructions on the Cimexa product say to apply it to all the bed parts including the mattress, boxspring, frame, and headboard.

    I also read that dehydrating bugs will behave disoriented and wander from their harborage. Which is why I thought it counter intuitive to provide a harborage in an area that will be dusted and they will wander from. But thank you for your response, I learned a lot about your perspective.

  59. Poiqm

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    If I were to drape plastic on the beds however, there'd be no reason for the bugs to live there and they might scatter to other places, like the corners of my ceiling where they can drop down onto the bed.... and possibly also infested my kids' room next door

    The way that I understand bb behavior is that they are drawn to your CO2 and body heat so sleeping on plastic you would still produce those two enticing things which would draw them to you, and that's where the interceptor traps and Cimexa go to work. You are the bait. If the bb reside near the bed then they will be drawn to it as usual and get caught in the traps trying to climb the bed. If the bb reside on the bed and decide that they want to go elsewhere for a meal because they can't breach the plastic barrier, then they will be caught in the traps as they try to climb down from the bed. If they drop to the floor instead of climb down then they land in a deadly layer of Cimexa which will do it's wonders.

    So as I said in my original post to you... by using the plastic you can still be the bait but you don't have to be dinner. I only mentioned it because honestly, the idea of an elderly person being eaten up while sleeping in the chair really touched me and I wanted to share options.

  60. Lllo

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    I think that David Cain has laid out a plan which is being followed. I also think he has far more knowledge and experience than many people here. I personally would follow his direction.

  61. somanybugs

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    Thank you Yohoki for the update of your treatment.

  62. SoulSeekerUSA

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    yohoki - 1 month ago  » 

    bed-bugscouk - 5 hours ago  » 
    What I would suggest is that you start to look at this in terms of what resources you do have. Start listing them from time to vaccuum cleaner to simple DIY tools like brushes paint and varnish.
    Once we know what resources you have to draw upon we can help direct you towards a solution that is likely to work.

    I have a few resources I can list, definitely.
    Trashbags --- duct tape --- a little leftover paint (not enough for the whole house. Maybe a single room) --- wood stain (indoor and outdoor, a few cans) --- paint brushes (some bristle, some sponge) --- basic cleaning chemicals and supplies (sorry. Not at home. Assume I have it, if not I can probably get it.) --- woodworking tools (we can make anything from new tools to new furniture in the garage. Basics like screws and chisels to advanced tools like a table saw) --- a few movable lights and lamps --- tin foil --- hair dryer --- clothes drier and washer --- oven --- soldering gun ---- sewing thread and needles
    It occurs to me as I'm writing this that I really don't know what supplies I have that might be useful. Cleaners of course. Trash bags. But after that, I'm just kinda listing things I know are laying around the house because they're useful for other household problems.
    But, in listing this I get some ideas... ideas they may or may not be safe at all, but I'm willing to tinker with. Here's an idea I just had. I know heat is deadly to the bugs. I'm wondering if anything I have can be made into a heat gun. Maybe a lamp and some tin foil, maybe the heating element from the hair drier or just funnel the air into a small tube to concentrate it?
    I'm thinking the trash bags may work to cover the beds if I tape them good and tight and do a couple layers for redundancy.

    One thing that is invaluable in the fight, is a STEAMER, a steamer alone can pretty much eradicate them all. Just need to keep up with it. You can get a decent steamer for a couple hundred dollars and a so so one for around a $100. I would definitely recommend the more expensive one if you can swing it. I have done so much research on this nasty little POS and time and time again the only thing even better than a heat treatment which is expensive and does not work most of the time I keep seeing the steamer as the one true tool that DOES work and works well.

  63. FayeState

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    Mon Jan 30 2017 20:57:41
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    Somany,
    That is a couple week old update. Hopefully he is doing well and we'll get another update soon.

  64. mp7ski

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    I'm hopeful yohoki hasn't updated because he's entrenched in his battle with these demons. Wish he could afford a decent steamer though, it would undoubtedly be a priceless tool in his arsenol.

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  65. FayeState

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    Wed Feb 1 2017 19:39:35
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    Well maybe we'll get an update soon since Wednesday is the night he said his family goes to church and he can do treatments. Hope it is going ok.

  66. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Thu Feb 2 2017 0:13:04
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    Be assured that yohoki is in touch with the necessary people, and will be updating us further in future.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  67. FayeState

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Thu Feb 2 2017 0:30:12
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    Thanks. I am glad he is still making progress and look forward to his future update.

  68. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Thu Feb 16 2017 13:17:28
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    FayeState - 2 weeks ago  » 
    Thanks. I am glad he is still making progress and look forward to his future update.

    I also hope he gives an update soon. The last one was a month ago...

  69. FayeState

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Mon Feb 27 2017 20:07:36
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    Hopefully soon. Interested in hearing how it is going - which hopefully is well.

    bugged-cdn - 1 week ago  » 

    FayeState - 2 weeks ago  » 
    Thanks. I am glad he is still making progress and look forward to his future update.

    I also hope he gives an update soon. The last one was a month ago...

  70. Poiqm

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Tue Feb 28 2017 0:00:43
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    It's been 6 weeks since the last update and if the infestation isn't resolved by now (or mostly) then something isn't going right. He's using Cimexa so I have hopes that it's resolved. I'm curious to hear more about the passive monitors. The last update said zero activity in the monitors through week 2 of treatment.

  71. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Tue Feb 28 2017 6:17:43
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    Hi Poiqm,

    On another thread you said you felt "harassed", maybe the first step to releasing that feeling is to not do unto others what you dislike yourself. Otherwise I would tend to agree with the later part of what you wrote.

    David

  72. bugged-cdn

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Tue Feb 28 2017 7:34:24
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    David, are you able to update on yohoki's situation? Many members here are genuinely interested in hearing about his progress.

  73. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 months ago
    Tue Feb 28 2017 7:58:06
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    I have sent an email asking for an update.

    David


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