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Please help ID this. Rust colored worms on mattress - Pics included.

(11 posts)
  1. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 1:31:27
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    Haven't been bitten as far as I can tell, this is a rust colored worm that I found on my mattress. I looked online and there haven't been any definitive explanations of what this could be, also I haven't seen any pictures to confirm that the rust colored worms discussed are the same as what I'm seeing. Hopefully these high resolution pictures will help with the ID.



    Thanks in advance for any help!

  2. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 1:35:08
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  3. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 1:43:25
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    Sorry meant to put this in the Bed Bug Identification Category. I couldn't edit the classification after I posted. Moderator, please move at your discretion.

  4. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 6:31:08
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    Not worms, but larvae, specifically carpet beetle larvae and most likely black carpet beetle larvae.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult in all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology.
  5. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 8:45:28
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    Thanks for the quick ID! I've periodically found these in various nooks on the underside of my mattress (between the box spring and the matress) over the years. Can't say that I've seen any damage from them even though indications on the web are that they are voracious eaters. Websearch basically says that vacuuming is the first step towards solving the problem. Given that I've seen these periodically over the years, could it be that my mattress is infected? In your experience should I just toss the mattress?

  6. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 8:56:05
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    I should also add that I've never seen any of these pests in adult form in my apt. Is that typcial to see the larvae, but never the adults?

  7. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 9:13:56
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    Hi,

    Adult carpet beetles are much harder to find as they don't live for very long and tend to be in too much of a hurry finding new places to invade and new sources of food. The larval stages don't tend to be as mobile and grow up consuming the food sources that the adults found for them.

    Hope that makes sense.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 17:01:10
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    Bravo, Lou!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  9. cilecto

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 18:42:10
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    The experts did not mention it, but there's probably no need to toss the bedding.

    Also, these larvae tend to shed tiny "hairs" that some people get skin reactions to.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  10. Webposttemppic

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Jan 23 2012 21:22:27
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    Thanks all for your input! Much appreciated. I will vaccuum the both sides of mattress and box spring and see what happens from there.

  11. loubugs

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Jan 24 2012 8:04:08
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    Don't forget the adults are primarily there for mating and reproducing another generation and in doing so will search out egg laying sites that could be in cracks and crevices in the floor and behind molding because the accumulation of organic debris is what the larvae feed on. Organic debris includes hair, dander, dead insects, shed skins of insects, food spillage debris, down, woolens, etc. Adults often found crawling up walls, at windows. Can find the beetles in electric lights, UV monitoring devices (attraction and dead insects). Larval setae and also breakdown dusts from deterioration of shed skins and bodies contribute to allergic reactions. Can be inhalant, can be contact with skin.


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