Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

Pets

(33 posts)
  1. kodell

    newbite
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 2

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 17 2007 0:51:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I've protected my bed, but I'm wondering about my dog. Are the bugs going to go after him?

  2. Bugalina

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 508

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 17 2007 5:29:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    When I was living with bed bugs, and sleeping on a protected area, the bugs did start to bite my dog. She is a non shedder with hair, but she has a soft underbelly. I saw red marks on her underbelly. My husband and I decided to board her during the treatments. She was boarded for 3 weeks. It was a terrible time, but I didn't want her to be a blood supply.

  3. buggeroff

    member
    Joined: Jul '07
    Posts: 180

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 17 2007 11:15:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bugalina: When you were dealing with this stuff, did you learn anything about whether Advantage/Frontline/Revolution had any effect on BBs? My cat has not been bitten, so far as I can tell, but that could just be coincidence. I found nothing that discussed the repellent effect of Frontline and its ilk on BBs.

  4. nightshirt

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 454

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 17 2007 12:30:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    my dog uses revolution and although i did not see any red anythings on him he was definately constantly scratching his itches. and after a treatment it would subside so i think that those products do not protect the pet.

  5. Bugalina

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 508

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 17 2007 15:25:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    buggeroff....I did apply frontline to my dog....but she still got bit....when I ran this by others on the Blog or Yahoo Group , they said that maybe I did not apply the frontline correctly, I didn't really rub it in enough....apparently it really has to be rubbed in....but however I applied it, it didn't work....I am certain that the red marks I found on her underbelly were bed bug bites....It makes me sick to even recall it..

  6. kodell

    newbite
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 2

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 19 2007 2:46:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, everyone, for your input. So do bedbugs not like to bite pets where they have fur? My dog does have Frontline on him. I just checked his belly, and don't see any bites.

  7. Bugalina

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 508

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Aug 19 2007 10:17:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bed bugs do not climb thru fur very easily...if at all....remember, they have to put their "probosic" thru the skin...they need a smooth area to do this...so fur is not conducive to their method of feeding.. The soft under belly or any soft , hairless areas of a pet are open to feeding ..so check your pet in these areas of their bodies....

  8. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 9:35:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Having 5 dogs, 2 of which get exposed to bedbugs as an occupational hazard, I have done a bit of research on this....

    Frontline Plus is what we use due to the fact that we live out in the woods in a very heavy tick and flea infested part of the world. From a bedbug point of view however, it offers little to no protection. Fipronil (the active adulticide ingredient) has NO repelancy whatsoever. In fact, that is why we use it for termites and ants.. they don't know they are getting in it and take it back on them to the colony. It is also somewhat of a slow kill. I have talked to someone who did efficacy studies of Fipronil on BBs and they said it doesn't work as well as anyone expected. The other ingredient in Frontline is an IGR... again, IGR's are having some reallllllly unexpected effects on BBs.

    I spoke with our vet, and the state parisitologist, and their recommendation was if I didn't feel the frontline would cut it, to add a permethrin or pyrethrin spray on top of it, especially after a known exposure. Apparently they don't read Dr. Potter's studies.

    The protocol we follow with the bedbug K-9s is to keep them on the frontline, spray them with the pyrethrin after any inspection with a hit, and then follow that with a thorough bath and blow dry (with a commercial grade blower) at the end of the day.

    For a pet in a house under infestation, that may be a bit much to do.. and unfortunately, the kenneling concept may be the best course of action. We know the bugs will happily feed on our pets (don't forget the birds!!!), and it much harder for a pet to let you know they are itching all over or are uncomfortable from the bites. Make sure that your treatment protocols used include the pet bedding! Do not take any pet toys or bedding to the kennel. The washer/dryer routine would be highly recommended for the bedding if at all possible. With birds, I always recommend putting the bird in a different cage and sanitizing the regular cage. (Steaming all these thing has a side benefit of making a healthier environment for the animals).

  9. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 16,902

    online

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 14:20:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, K9Handler, for the experience you bring on this front.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  10. lieutenantdan

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 1,222

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 15:48:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bed bugs do bite dogs.

  11. willow-the-wisp

    banned
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 1,527

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 17:49:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    thanks k9handler--this also follows what limited tests I had done on "Advantage" in a very small non-scientific uncontrolled "study." Any thoghts on Advantage???

  12. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 23:40:42
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Willow,

    Unfortunately, I do not have any hard data on imidacloprid (the active ingredient in advantage) vs. bedbugs. Part of the reason for that is a field study done but the University of Georgia that showed while it does kill 99-100% of fleas and ticks in the first 24 hours of application, by the second week it was starting to fail, and by the labelled re-application time, had failed miserably. Most police forces use Frontline Plus on their K-9s, and this may be part of the reason. I assume that the case may be the same for bedbugs, if it works at all.

    There are two potential advantages to it- one, that it is a nicotoid, so it is in slightly different chemical class from most pesticides out there. (all you smokers out there take note.. some of our pesticides are based on, or are, nicotine!!! that does not mean I am saying go blow your cigarette smoke on your bedbugs.. the added CO2 may just make them extra excited. you aren't supposed to smoke in bed anyway) and two, it does in general act as a repellant. Wether it is repellant to bedbugs, I can't answer... I do know that from talking with some researchers on this topic, that in effect NO residual chemical class we have now will keep hungry bedbugs away from a meal. This is one of the reasons we as PCO's use you as bait to lure the bedbugs into the chemical barriers we have sprayed. Sorry to reveal that ugly truth to those of you who hadn't figured that out. (we also use you and your pets as bait when we do a flea treatment.. we do not have any chemicals that will kill a flea in the pupal stage, so we have to draw them out with heat and motion.)

    So sorry to not have anything like good news to report from my end on it. The vet and parisitologist didn't give me any suggestions pointing towards Advantage either (they both seemed aware of the UGA study). If I do find something, believe me I will let ya know. Right after I buy a years supply of it for all our dogs. (and maybe some for myself. The technical grade DEET that I use on myself and our techs is only good on bedbugs for +/- 2 hours)

    Utterly off topic tip... use the internet to search for the lowest price you can on flea/tick/heartworm control.. print it out.. take it to your vet and see if they will price match... I bought our heartworm medicine for 4 of our dogs a few days ago and saved $294 off our vet's regular price for a year's supply.

  13. wantmyskinback

    member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 344

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 20 2007 23:59:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Again K9Handler: This is very interesting information. It's distressing to finally realize that the bugs DO in fact bite dogs. Since they have so much hair/fur I always thought it was not possible.

  14. Ru

    junior member
    Joined: Jul '07
    Posts: 53

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Aug 21 2007 10:13:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This is very helpful information from SPDIBBK9Handler. Thanks! These parasites are extremely resiliant and strong and after all, are a force of nature. Mother nature is not always our friend. Remember that line from the movie Jurassic Park?
    "Life will find a way."

  15. BuggedOut

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Aug 22 2007 11:03:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I told my roomie that we should go ahead and make the bed bugs pets. God knows we've spent enough money on them. Plus, we feed them and they sleep in the bed anyway!

    kodell and everyone else, good luck keeping the 'kids' bb-free. My boyfriend has three little dogs and I worry about taking the bugs over there ALL the time. Great advice here.

  16. nightshirt

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 454

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Aug 22 2007 16:31:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    k9 what about revolution? i have done no studying as to its active ingredience but maybe you know. my pet did get bit, he was scratcing constantly and showed no signs of being bitten. i knew when i needed another round of pco treatments when he would start up again - somethimes even before i got bit again.

    thanks.

  17. Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Aug 22 2007 18:55:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This seems to be mostly about dogs. . . I'm curious if anyone has cats and has ever seen anything? (excessive scratching, obvious bites, etc?) We have five. . four sleep mostly with me & hubby. . (which is why I had people - my mother, landlord, pest guy) question me on fleas, which they don't have. (indoor, checked regularly, especially recently, hubby is very allergic to fleas)

  18. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Aug 22 2007 22:31:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Nightshirt,
    Selamectin is the A.I. in Revolution. It isn't used in any pesticides I know of, so I do not have a frame of reference to it from a professional standpoint. It is a synthetic avermectin, which we do use in some baits, but do not have any interior sprays for. My guess is that it has no repelancy to it, but that it may kill the bugs that feed on the pets. That doesn't do the pet much good in the short term, as they will still have reactions to the bites they receive. In a bad (I know, a relative term in bedbugs. some or most of you would say 1 bug is bad) infestation, the pet would still be subject to multiple bites on a continuing basis as just the ones that feed on the pet would get killed. (I also don't know about LT100 for it)and the others that were happily munching on you kept on reproducing. As with most things bedbug, this is a complicated issue, and probably a multi-faceted approach is best. Use multiple chemicals on the pet, clean their bedding as you would yours, etc. You could always just let the pet sleep in the isolated bed with you.

    Sixteen,
    I am pretty sure any domesticated pet is subject to the same treatment by the bedbugs. They will also feed on rats and mice if you have those infesting your house. They prefer humans, but will eat just about anything warm blooded if they have too. Cats tend to run temperatures higher than dogs even, so I don't know if that would cause the bugs to select them more often, equal to us, or less often... I know I read something in Monograph about alternate host preference in bedbugs, but I can't remember at the moment. (anyone else on here geeky enough to have that book and remember the section??) If I were a little more awake, I'd go look it up in Usinger's book, but I had a long day of killing things, (bedbugs included), and need to get some sleep soon. If it is covered in there, and I have time, I will look it up and let you know if they do have a preferred host temp, and if they tested cats. I know cat fleas prefer a hotter host, (90% of flea infestations in our area are cat fleas. Not that I usually bother to ID them.. as the treatment is the same on those whether they are dog, cat, rat or human fleas.)

  19. Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Aug 22 2007 22:39:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks K9 . . if you do have a chance to look up that info, that would be great - but you have a life and I understand that LOL

    I used to have rats, up until a year ago. . They make lovely pets. . Just have the five cats and four gerbils now. .

    Man what I wouldn't give for this to actually be fleas. Hubby's allergy and all! Fleas are much more simple (though you still have to work) to deal with. .

  20. nightshirt

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 454

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 11:30:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    freddie does sleep with me. thanks for the info k9 now all i need to do is google all the chemical names you wrote about that are in revolution and ill be in the know! thanks for your time.

  21. lieutenantdan

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 1,222

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 11:35:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    K9,
    You seem to be very professional. Where is your company located?

  22. Bugalina

    senior member
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 508

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 13:26:56
    #



    Login to Send PM

    SPK9Handler...I have posted many times that during my infestation bed bugs were eatting off my Pup...her little soft underbelly had the telltale red 2 in a row punture/bite marks. I think many have not believed me so I am glad to see that you have validated this. Also, in the original home where my infestation reared its ugly head, there were mice, because the landlady had a ton of cardboard boxed stacked to the ceiling, in the basement..during the winter I could smell that nasty nesting odor. When I told this to the exterminator he informed me that bed bugs would go to the mice and possiblly eventually return to my family, unless they too were eradicated. That's when I fled from this house. That said I really appreciate your professional help. It came up a while back that many people with cats had bed bugs, people questioned if those with cats were more likely to have infestations. I don't have cats, but I remember this coming up. I tend to think not, however, I do think that cats might make an extermination more difficult and I also think that allowing the cats into the bed is not a prudent idea....Do you think that bed bug eggs can stick to the fur of cats ???

  23. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 21:57:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sixteen,
    It appears from a temperature point of view, Usinger only tested rabbit, chicken and human average temperatures, and found a preference for rabbit over man, and a further preference for temperatures higher than even rabbit over rabbit. I would take that to mean they seek out the "brightest" heat signature, which if you have cats, would be cats over you.

    Lt.Dan,
    I don't know if it more very geeky and obsessed, rather than professional, but I will take it as a compliment either way. Our home base is in North Carolina, though we do find ourselves traveling quite a bit lately. Feel free to PM if you need more info than that, but I try to abide by that whole not advertising without paying nobugsonme dictum.

    Bugalina,
    I can't say definitively on the clinging to fur part. My gut tells me they could certainly be transported in the collar of any pet. I also know they somehow get widely dispersed among bat colonies, as they are found in a decent percentage of bat colonies in the US. Which would indicate me they can cling to bats, either as eggs, nymphs or adults... and bat fur is much shorter than most cat's. Flying is also a wee bit on the rougher side than a ride on the average couch cushion kitty. My bigger harping point with people with pets and bedbugs, is don't forget the pet toys! A cat scratching post strikes me as a lovely bedbug haven (especially the wrapped rope ones). Also don't forget that clusters of bedbugs would be likely to be found near the pet's favourite sleeping areas, either day time nap spots or regular night time bedding.

    As to the people with cats being more prone to infestations, I would say it more likely that there may be a greater strain on the immune systems of people with cats from their dander, so maybe they are the ones more likely to react to bites. (this is strictly labeled as pure speculation with NO basis or backing). People often forget that a positive correlation does not mean causation.

    /personal rant/
    Some day someone will have a question for me (either here on in the field) where I have something resembling a happy answer regarding bedbugs. I guess the whole we don't *think* they transmit diseases is going to have to suffice for the near term. On a person note, and from a PCO standpoint, it is really hard to tell people straight up how rough treating these buggers is. We are used to being able to handle almost any pest problem with same day service. I kinda miss the days where a technical challenge was figuring out where the source of a dermestrid beetle invasion was. (answer is almost always an abondoned nest in a wall void in these parts) It stings the ego a bit to say we should if everything goes well knock them down in say a month, two at the outside. /end rant/

  24. Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 22:02:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    "It came up a while back that many people with cats had bed bugs, people questioned if those with cats were more likely to have infestations."

    Hmmm. I'm not sure how the two would really connect. . . I mean, if you have them, you have them, right? Cats being in the house wouldn't change the used couch someone bought, or the kids' friend who slept over, or any of that. . so if they got brought in (or came from a neighbour through the wall or whatever), then the cats don't really decide that. . know what I mean?

  25. Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 22:10:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    K9, you must have posted while I was writing as I didn't see yours until I posted. .

    "Sixteen,
    It appears from a temperature point of view, Usinger only tested rabbit, chicken and human average temperatures, and found a preference for rabbit over man, and a further preference for temperatures higher than even rabbit over rabbit. I would take that to mean they seek out the "brightest" heat signature, which if you have cats, would be cats over you."

    Thanks for checking the information, much appreciated!

    I've checked my cats over and I can't find any signs of them being bit - but I suppose it could be hard to see. . .

    "As to the people with cats being more prone to infestations, I would say it more likely that there may be a greater strain on the immune systems of people with cats from their dander, so maybe they are the ones more likely to react to bites."

    Hmmm, interesting theory! *nods*

    "People often forget that a positive correlation does not mean causation."

    I think that's whay i was trying to say above, but I didn't have a good sentence for it LOL

  26. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 22:13:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sixteen, the line I meant to include, but forgot was bedbugs probably don't care who they get to go home with when they hitch a ride in. It may also be that in houses with pets, there are simply more hosts around, which can support a larger population of bugs, or at least help the critters get established more thoroughly. In theory you could have bugs set up around a pet's sleeping area first, and the humans don't start getting bit until the bugs spread out from a well established base. If they don't make it to your bed until the 4th or 5th generation, you probably feel like you went from 0 to crazy amounts much faster that those who are the sole host for their population of them.

  27. Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Aug 23 2007 22:28:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well now I'm back to glad that four of the five sleep with us - since I've started to wrap my head around (likely) dealing with 3 bedrooms (well, 2 perhaps only) and I really would fall way back in that if I thought I had a pet sleeping area infestation as well . . but four always sleep upstairs in beds and the one other sleeps on the kitchen counter in a very inhospitable-to-bugs type of area.

    Of course, I don't want my cats being bit either! But then, if I think of booting them from the bedroom, could that not work like when people move and bring their bugs to the couch with them. . . oy.

  28. SPDIBBK9Handler

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '07
    Posts: 51

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Aug 24 2007 22:17:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sixteen,

    Having found bedbugs in pretty much every room of a structure, including the kitchen, I'd say short of having something that can hover 2' off the ground with a teflon coated umbrella over it, there are no inhospitable places for bedbugs My grandmother does love to tell the story though of how she would sleep on the dinner table some nights just to get away from them for a while. (the assumption I make is that worked for her as the entire family wouldn't fit, so there were still available hosts in the beds)

    I fear that your comment about having the pets kicked out causing the same movement to new areas is pretty much spot on.. the pets do put out CO2, have a heat signature, and do provide a meal... so the bedbugs are likely to follow them. Especially if you have isolated your bed properly.

  29. Judi72

    newbite
    Joined: Apr '08
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Apr 1 2008 22:58:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I can understand that bed bugs will feed on dogs, cats, and other furry or avian friends. However, I will be adopting 2 chinchillas in the coming weeks, and am curious to know whether anyone has had experience with chinchillas and bed bugs.

    Chinchillas look like they have a rabbit's body with large mouse-like ears and a squirrel's tail. They're found in the high altitudes of the Andes Mountains and therefore, have very dense fur. I've read that because of the density of their fur, fleas cannot feed on chinchillas (source: http://www.thechinbin.org/2007/11/getting-chinchilla-as-pet.html).

    Any thoughts?

  30. fuzzykittybugs

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '12
    Posts: 6

    offline

    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu Jul 19 2012 13:37:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I have read through this whole post and haven't seen anything about transporting pets from an infested home. We are tenting and I need to take the cats somewhere...I was hoping to take them to a friend's house. They do not wear collars and I haven't noticed any itching, but that doesn't necessarily mean they haven't been bitten. I don't want to risk taking the bugs with the cats! Of course I won't bring any cat toys, etc.

  31. MBastille

    newbite
    Joined: Sep '13
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Sep 24 2013 1:09:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    @ fuzzykittybugs

    Best thing to do is to quarantine the pets somehow. Whether in some holding facility or a clinic where they can be checked for bugs. The last thing you want to do is infect a friend's house or spread them around elsewhere

  32. At the end

    newbite
    Joined: Oct '13
    Posts: 5

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Oct 8 2013 16:00:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I am struggling with bedbugs also with a number of animals in the house. Because of the numbers, it would be hard to board them. The furniture that I have left has been treated with Tempo under the cushions with the thought that if they came onto the dogs while on the sofa for instance, they would then go down into the cushions to hide and be killed by the insecticide. This doesn't seem to be working however. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

  33. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 16,902

    online

    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Oct 9 2013 0:42:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    At the end - 8 hours ago  » 
    I am struggling with bedbugs also with a number of animals in the house. Because of the numbers, it would be hard to board them. The furniture that I have left has been treated with Tempo under the cushions with the thought that if they came onto the dogs while on the sofa for instance, they would then go down into the cushions to hide and be killed by the insecticide. This doesn't seem to be working however. Does anyone have any thoughts on this?

    Everyone's case is different and it's important that we know more about the situation in order to try and make suggestions.

    So I have responded to your other post, which gives more details, and I suggest others follow this link and respond there also.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.