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nymph bites

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  1. nomorebugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 15:28:44
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    Hi Everyone,

    I know this has been rehashed many times. I just need to confirm now.

    I know bed bug bites affect people differently. For my case, when they first started, they are very itchy dime size pink spots. As a month of biting passed by, the bites got less itchy, but still were dime size pink spots. I assume these bites are from adults.

    I've been treated twice by the PCO, and I've gotten smaller spots, pinkish, but not bight pink, sort of raised, small whitish center. Are these nymph bites?

    I did not do all of the laundry in my closet. I was unaware of my guests for a month, I was anticipating that they would come feed on me and harbor near my bed. Which they did, they infested an therma rest I had next to the bed which I threw out. And on the seams of the bed. I cleaned it. I had my mattress treated twice, I encased the mattresses. As for my clothes there were never any evidence of infestation. Most where hung up.

    Complete and true isolation of the bed would seem hard as the room is so small and my bed large. I can't image how they would lay down a residual so the nymph will crawl through to get me -- unless it's all over the carpet.

    Any advice?

  2. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 19:16:56
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    Hi nomorebugs,

    This question does come up a lot, so some of the following may be general.

    Bedbug bites manifest in so many different ways that it's impossible to say yes or no based on description alone.

    Further, as we know from S's bite test (a story in 4 parts), it's probably not warranted by any actual information we currently have to speculate that smaller bites are caused by nymphs, as opposed to adults. More research is needed as the conclusions we can draw from S's test are necessarily so limited, but at least in her case that supposition was false.

    So, when you continue to have bite reactions, I guess:

    a) there could still be bedbugs in your home, perhaps a harborage site was never found, or they simply have survived the treatments in their wonted wiliness: however small the population that remains, they're not all dead yet -- it happens, for various reasons; or

    b) there could be no more bedbugs in your home, but you may continue to experience allergic skin reactions due to previous bites, and, if that is the case, and only a few people have reported going through this, perhaps one should expect to continue to experience such reactions for several weeks post-bedbugs.

    Alternatively, a person can have developed subsequent allergies to something else, although this is the weakest explanation, in my opinion.

    I can tell you that it can be pretty devastating if you guess wrong about what is going on in your home and you stop treatments. So, I have to advise you to act conservatively. But also be smart about it.

    The best possible course is to look for non-bite evidence of bedbugs. There has to be something else that you can find, fecal specks at the very least. When you start to suspect your bites, you need to stop relying on them alone as indicators of a continued infestation.

    Finally, two treatments strike me as pretty lucky in the bedbug eradication scheme of things. It is quite possible that you still have them. Maybe you need to consider NotSoSnug's methods of investigation.

  3. currentinsomniac

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 21:20:34
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    In my non-professional opinion I'd say that you still have BBs. I'm going through the same thing as you. I've had two treatments with my third on Friday. I am still getting bites. Mine are the same as yours. Ours in the beginning were bigger and more like welts. They have been getting smaller and smaller since treatments began and resemble what you describe. The latest have been small pimple-like bites....some with white raised centers...and some not so raised with dark red centers. I have even been seeing minute (about the size of a ball point pen mark) dark red spots with no surrounding red or pink to it...frequently near another small bite like described earlier. So since there is not a ton of evidence on how the bites look depending on the age of the bug, I wouldn't be surprised if they are nymph bites. Let's hope so, right?
    Maybe we'll get to wipe them out before they get any bigger.

  4. nomorebugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 27 2007 21:52:41
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    Thanks currentinsomniac. I think it's too much of a coincidence to be anything else. They are harboring but I can't find the locations. So I don't know how they are going to lay down a pesticide residual to kill them. Basically I live in a 15" x 12" room with a closet and a queen sized bed. I don't think I can isolate my bed. It's too small of a space.

  5. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 0:20:53
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    Then you should get another treatment, nomorebugs. I'm not following why you think that they cannot lay down a residual? The PCO can lift the edges of the carpet to treat there and they can definitely treat the bed frame and any other furniture. In fact, in a bed that is not isolated, the bed frame should be your prime suspect for harborage sites and should be inspected and treated at every PCO visit.

    Also, what about the adjacent rooms, were they also inspected/treated?

  6. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 14:52:41
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    nomorebugs,
    I had my rugs and furniture sprayed with Suspend SC and Gentrol mix and Whitemire BP-300. No stains.

  7. angie

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 14:59:29
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    Ya thats what they sprayed for me also and I didn't experience any stains. I did have to be out of the house for 4-6 hours though. Unfortunately, in my case, this didn't work! I couldn't remember the names.

  8. nomorebugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 15:09:20
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    Hi Everyone,

    The whole house was treated twice. Demand CS, Bedlam, and XLO. My bed and the adjoining bedroom bed was treated. After the second treatment I encased the bed and mattress with good quality covers. For the first two treatments, I experienced no bites until two weeks after treatment. I'm not absolutely positive, but I think the bites are from nymphs.

    I also found a small spot on my mattress cover which I installed after the second treatment. Then on the pillow case last night. It's a tiny spot. But I don't think it's a coincidence.

  9. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 15:43:18
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    Yeah, if eggs hatched, you could have a new population gearing up. I strongly suggest you get the PCO back in there. A lot of people (most?) need more than two treatments. I know this is the stage where you feel very uncertain of a positive outcome and you start to lose hope a little. Don't let that happen! Stay positive and focused. You can beat this, but you need more treatments.

    What type of bed frame do you have? They hide in the tiniest cracks. The frame has to be treated again. You can also try to inspect it carefully with a thin card. (Winston has mentioned a NYC MetroCard -- not sure if you have something similar where you live, a very thin plastic card.)

    Also, now may be the time to inspect the closet. Empty it out and allow room for the PCO to treat in there. They can be anywhere so that area must not be overlooked.

  10. nomorebugs

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 16:37:59
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    Thank you, hopelessnomore.

    I think the majority of cases took three treatments. Guess I was hoping I would be in the lucky category as the house is a newish single family home.

    Until the second treatment, I had no bed frame. The mattress and box spring was just siting on the floor which had wall to wall carpet. I like low beds. Anyway, on the second treatment I encased the bed and box spring and put it on a cheap metal frame. As it is small room and a queen bed, it's very difficult for me to isolate things especially in winter (blankets, clothes to keep warm).

    Thanks for your advice on the small plastic card. Moving the queen box spring off the frame by myself is hard and the cover will tear.

    I wasn't around or talked to the PCO. My landlord wanted to use them as they were cheap in treating the whole house. The pesticides they used seem appropriate for bedbugs. The other PCO's did not really install that much faith in me. One said I should throw away my bed (he saw that it's in good shape). The other listened to me alot (which I appreciate), sounded experienced, but suggest that perhaps my situation was under control and I should set off a fogger. That set off red flags.

    The PCO gave us a 60 guarantee. I sort of doubt if the PCO will honor it as there really is no clear sign of bugs (just my bites and two tiny dots). But a respray is only $100. The landlord is thinking about trying a new PCO, thinking they will different chemicals. But I'm not sure if that will be better. I did not keep on top of what the PCO did, just the chemicals on the first treatment. It's not the chemicals but how it's used. Again my bed is wrapped in covers, so I don't think heat treatment will be beneficial unless they find an infested site.

    I wished there were more specialized PCOs like David Cain or Sean where I live. On the other hand, the more people infested, the worst off we all are, but that's a certainty, so bring on the specialists. I've noticed this site getting a lot more active. The people who do the major university dorms only does commercial buildings.

  11. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 28 2007 22:54:49
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    I hear you. The only problem I see with switching PCOs right now is the delay. It's already how long since the last treatment? Remember that bedbugs can complete their life cycle in a short month in ideal circumstances. Then, more eggs.

    The tiny spots on the cover and pillowcase are important and a good PCO will know that they, plus your bites, indicate a problem.

    I would bring this PCO back now if treatment is still under warranty. Don't get pessimistic before the facts. Call to schedule an appointment. Remember that you did find relief with the first two treatments. Now it's a matter of getting the next generation before they settle in. You and your landlord can still explore hiring another PCO but it seems to me that you'll feel better doing rather than worrying and waiting. Clear out the closet, do more laundry, call the PCO, inspect. I know what this is like as the days stretch on and one begins to despair. Better to keep going doing everything you can think of.


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