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nuvan prostrips in bags

(8 posts)
  1. BuggyDad

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Aug 23 2011 16:10:23
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    I'm about to treat my daughter's belongings that can't be treated in other ways. (She's an artist, so has a lot of paintings on stretchers, materials, along with the usual assortment of electronics and an Imelda Marcos collection of shoes.)

    As for technique, I know hanging from above is the preferred method, but in a bag that could be hard to do. I think I remember someone asking if just placing the strip in the bag would work, but can't find an answer to that. (Obviously following the protocol of plenty of air space and items loosely stacked, etc.)

    As for effectiveness, I've seen included in objects to treat both books and plush toys. How do the fumes of the strips penetrate deeply into a plush toy, (about the size of a football), or between the pages of a closed book? It doesn't seem that there would be sufficient air exchange to accomplish this.

    Thanks in advance, BD

  2. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Aug 24 2011 0:48:54
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    Note that Nuvan Prostrips (label downloadable here) are only labeled for use by pest control professionals. The product is, however, labeled specifically for use with bed bugs and in sealed bags (the latest version of the label describes this use).

    I believe that another DDVP product, Hot Shot No Pest Strips2 (label downloadable here), is labeled for consumer use. However, my understanding of this is that it is not labeled for the use you suggest (in bags). (It also isn't labeled for use on bed bugs, and Jeff White goes into what that means in the video below.)

    I am not sure what happened with the earlier version of Hot Shot No-Pest Strips (minus the "2"), but the label for these cannot be found on the Hot Shot website anymore.

    Most people here aren't qualified to advise on the use of these products even within the label instructions. I'm not. No one here who is not a named expert should be giving you advice on these, except that you should use products only in accordance with labeling instructions.

    It's also worth noting that a number of known experts on this site advise against the use of DDVP strips by consumers for safety reasons. I believe these include Sean Rollo of the Bed Bug Resource and Winston O'Buggy (whose identity and credentials are known to me).

    I would recommend that you read this article from Pest Management Professional magazine (note: it is aimed at professionals and products labeled for their use), and watch Jeff White of Bed Bug Central talking about the products in the video below.

    As Jeff notes, you should contact the manufacturers of these products if you have questions about how they should be used and what they can be used to treat. You can find the manufacturers via the websites hosting the labels linked above.

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Flash Video

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. Boxspring1212

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Aug 24 2011 11:16:38
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    My PCO provided strips that fit into a white plastic holder. I was told to place it in a plastic bag (I used contractors bags because they are far stronger than regular garbage bags) with lightly packed clothes, shoes, etc. Then leave for a month. I am pretty sure the strips they gave me were Nuvan, but as I did not purchase them directly, I don't know for sure. At the end of the treatment period I had to air out the stuff in a well-ventilated area. There was some smell but it wore off.

    I know that some people think you should not use the strips in this way. I did it under the guidance of a PCO and it was useful for the shoes, handbags, and delicate vintage clothing that I could not afford to dry clean. If I had decided to buy a Packtite, that would have probably been a good alternative, btw.

  4. prephelpny2011

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Aug 24 2011 11:59:36
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    Not an expert by any means.
    We looked into this as it was recommended by PCO, however, the more we looked into it, it didn't seem like a good idea, as we were going to do this in the apartment we lived in, and we were warned on this forum and other info we found on line that is a BAD idea--should be in an area different from where you live and sleep.

  5. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Aug 24 2011 12:01:58
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    If you live in the United States and you're dealing with bed bugs, a Packtite is a good option for many of the items you're talking about needing to treat.

    If you're going to have to dry clean a lot of fabric items, the cost of the Packtite may more than pay for itself, and it has the bonus of being reusable over time, unlike dry cleaning. If you or your daughter travel regularly, it has the bonus benefit of being a good tool to help dramatically decrease the chances of future infestations as you can use it to treat your luggage after trips.

    Also, unlike the DDVP strips, it will not leave a smell behind. While DDVP offgases a gas fumigant, so I worry less about overexposure to the chemical from reading a book that's been treated with it, I would worry about the smell seeping into a beloved stuffed animal or toy.

  6. BuggyDad

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Aug 24 2011 17:31:48
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    Thanks for the feed back from all. Actually, my interest in this method was sparked by previous accounts on other threads in the forum, where people have described success in using it.

    I'm thinking the toy (there is only one) will be fine in a commercial dryer, (using care not to contaminate or spread the bugs.) Many of the paintings are wall sized oils, so a packtite won't work for that. There is the option of sealing her belongings and furniture up and storing for 18 - 24 months, and I'm still considering that route.

    I did read the product lit. for Nuvan and the journal publication of the relevant toxicology studies, and while I'm not a licensed PCO, I'm still considering using the Nuvan in a sealed area (big bag) procedure, which is in accordance with the supplemental label sheet specifically for bb's. http://www.amvac-chemical.com/products/documents/nuvanprostripplus_supplabel_bedbug.pdf

    If I decide on this method, I'll extend the treatment based on the results of the U. of Kentucky study, which indicated that longer times would be needed to insure 100% mortality. BTW... the bb's survival of this method mentioned in the video was due to the way the study was conducted. The surviving bb's were buried deeply within the articles where there was limited air exchange, and were also contained, preventing them from moving and being exposed. The published study states that in a real world application, all the bb's would likely have been killed, since they would have moved and been exposed.

    We'll see how it goes.

  7. shiry7

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 1 2011 8:38:00
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    I would like to try the hotshot strips mentioned in the video posted by nobugsonme. can anyone explain the dangers associated with ddvp?

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 1 2011 18:35:47
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    shiry7 - 9 hours ago  » 
    I would like to try the hotshot strips mentioned in the video posted by nobugsonme. can anyone explain the dangers associated with ddvp?

    The strips give off a deadly toxic gas. If you use the products incorrectly, people or pets can die or be made ill.

    Many PCOs who post here advise against their use. Some don't. However, no one is going to advise their use lightly, and no one should be giving off the cuff tips about something like this. The best advice anyone can give is to read the label and follow the instructions on the product.

    You should also read the PMP article I linked to but remember it's for people whose job is to follow labeling instructions on what are generally potentially deadly products.


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