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not real illusional feeling of bed bugs still around

(12 posts)
  1. lehieu0713

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Sat Mar 11 2017 1:54:16
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    I lived in Seattle in an apartment infected with bed bugs and cockroaches from Jan 2012 to Oct 2013 but the nightmares and the fear remains until now even though it has been 4 years since I left that place. I still feel the insects crawling on my skin during my sleep and those feelings that I'm a disgusting human being when hide my scabies. Right now I'm living in Viet Nam where there are no bed bugs but the fear still remains and there is no one here who understands what the hell I was talking about.
    How do I break this illusion?

  2. BigDummy

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 9:33:12
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    Head bugs can be a real pain to break free from.
    I travel Central America at least once a year and it impresses me that bed bugs have never been an issue in the twelve years I've been wandering down there. I think cultures like ours where we hoard "stuff" make treatments so much harder. From my experience in tropical areas it seems like less time is spent indoors, and there are far fewer items inside. The size of homes is also much larger here in the US as compared to other regions making treatments harder.
    I don't know, it's all just speculation on my part as I've not run into or heard of bed bug issues from any of my friends down in Central America but I suspect it has quite a bit to do with lifestyle. I think you're in the right part of the world to reduce concerns of possible bed bug exposure. Hostels, resorts and the like may pose higher risks due to their clientele, but again, just speculation.

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  3. crossroads

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Mon Mar 13 2017 10:38:39
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    BigDummy - 1 hour ago  » 
    I think you're in the right part of the world to reduce concerns of possible bed bug exposure. Hostels, resorts and the like may pose higher risks due to their clientele, but again, just speculation.

    I saw what looked like certain evidence when evaluating a cheap village hotel/hostel in Laos, next door to Vietnam. (See previous post). Did the 'mattress check' and there was horrendous blood staining in one corner. Of course I chose a different hotel.

    Apart from that, so far I have not encountered them in that part of Asia.

  4. loubugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 7:14:16
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    Hotels are very different from homes. Influx of non-native people just visiting and bring things along that also aren't native. Interesting, but there is the tropical bed bug (Cimex hemipterus) that should be in Viet Nam, Laos, etc. Cimex lectularius is the common bed bug with which we the most issues and what people write about on this site.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  5. crossroads

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 8:13:22
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    loubugs - 55 minutes ago  » 
    there is the tropical bed bug (Cimex hemipterus) that should be in Viet Nam, Laos, etc. Cimex lectularius is the common bed bug with which we the most issues and what people write about on this site.

    With foreign tourists bringing hitchhiking lectularius into these countries, is there any chance of crossbreeding with hemipterus occurring, Lou?

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 8:49:06
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    Hi,

    I seem to recall that Sheffield may have worked on inter breeding and it does not have a high efficiency.

    I have from time to time found infestations of "tourist" bugs but it is generally not something we look out for. The up side it that they tend to be a lot easier to kill because they have not had the exposure to and thus had time to develop resistance to the products that tend to be available in US, Canada, EU.

    I would personally be more worried about the spread of rhetoric about immigrants than anything that is actively migrating with them.

    In the UK there is a popular myth that bed bugs are associated with a particular country of origin. It is actually more accurate to state that there is a bed bug infested bottle neck which many migrants pass through in coming to the country.

    Hope that helps.

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  7. loubugs

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Mar 14 2017 8:49:48
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    crossroads - 35 minutes ago  » 

    loubugs - 55 minutes ago  » 
    there is the tropical bed bug (Cimex hemipterus) that should be in Viet Nam, Laos, etc. Cimex lectularius is the common bed bug with which we the most issues and what people write about on this site.

    With foreign tourists bringing hitchhiking lectularius into these countries, is there any chance of crossbreeding with hemipterus occurring, Lou?

    Why worry about it? But, there have been cross breeding experiments and it doesn't work well.

  8. crossroads

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Mar 15 2017 2:12:16
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    bed-bugscouk - 17 hours ago  » 
    I have from time to time found infestations of "tourist" bugs but it is generally not something we look out for. The up side it that they tend to be a lot easier to kill because they have not had the exposure to and thus had time to develop resistance to the products that tend to be available in US, Canada, EU.

    Oh, I actually meant tourists from the west bringing their bedbugs into places like Laos and Vietnam, not the other way round!

    Thanks for the info, guys.

  9. mp7ski

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Mar 15 2017 4:12:04
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    crossroads - 1 hour ago  » 

    bed-bugscouk - 17 hours ago  » 
    I have from time to time found infestations of "tourist" bugs but it is generally not something we look out for. The up side it that they tend to be a lot easier to kill because they have not had the exposure to and thus had time to develop resistance to the products that tend to be available in US, Canada, EU.

    Oh, I actually meant tourists from the west bringing their bedbugs into places like Laos and Vietnam, not the other way round!
    Thanks for the info, guys.

    Just curious, how bad of an infestation did you have in Seattle and how did you escape it?

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
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    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Mar 15 2017 5:11:00
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    crossroads - 2 hours ago  » 
    Oh, I actually meant tourists from the west bringing their bedbugs into places like Laos and Vietnam, not the other way round!

    Now that is actually a much greater concern.

    The classic model of the dangers of this are writing in the histories of the indigenous peoples of many parts of the world. Rather than importing "high density" diseases of the "modern world" into "low density" communities people are transporting resistant strains of bed bugs into parts of the world without the modern tools to deal with it.

    It would be like trying to fight MRSA when all you have is penicillin and a poultice.

    Its one of the reasons why we have always resisted making a blue tooth - wi-fi enabled bed bug monitor which alerts you when they are present. While it works for those areas with power, with wi-fi it becomes far from a universal solution and not as green as we could be without it.

    Interestingly enough the Far East and Australasia is blessed when it comes to passionate academics and bed bugs. Prof Lee of the University of Malaysia is a man I greatly respect and is only now finding answers to questions that have vexed me for many years but he does have the advantage of a scanning electron microscope (one has been on my wish list for years (anyone with a spare $0.5M please get in touch)). There is also Stephen Doggett in Australia who is the founder of the bed bug code of best practice approach through open consultation. A fascinating person (like Lou) and someone I have been lucky enough to share an Indian meal with on many occasions (Lou and I tend to go for Japanese).

    I have also been promised a trip at some stage to speak at one of the local meetings on bed bugs and my long term perspective.

    David

  11. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Mar 15 2017 5:11:00
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    crossroads - 2 hours ago  » 
    Oh, I actually meant tourists from the west bringing their bedbugs into places like Laos and Vietnam, not the other way round!

    Now that is actually a much greater concern.

    The classic model of the dangers of this are writing in the histories of the indigenous peoples of many parts of the world. Rather than importing "high density" diseases of the "modern world" into "low density" communities people are transporting resistant strains of bed bugs into parts of the world without the modern tools to deal with it.

    It would be like trying to fight MRSA when all you have is penicillin and a poultice.

    Its one of the reasons why we have always resisted making a blue tooth - wi-fi enabled bed bug monitor which alerts you when they are present. While it works for those areas with power, with wi-fi it becomes far from a universal solution and not as green as we could be without it.

    Interestingly enough the Far East and Australasia is blessed when it comes to passionate academics and bed bugs. Prof Lee of the University of Malaysia is a man I greatly respect and is only now finding answers to questions that have vexed me for many years but he does have the advantage of a scanning electron microscope (one has been on my wish list for years (anyone with a spare $0.5M please get in touch)). There is also Stephen Doggett in Australia who is the founder of the bed bug code of best practice approach through open consultation. A fascinating person (like Lou) and someone I have been lucky enough to share an Indian meal with on many occasions (Lou and I tend to go for Japanese).

    I have also been promised a trip at some stage to speak at one of the local meetings on bed bugs and my long term perspective.

    David

  12. lehieu0713

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    Posted 1 month ago
    Thu Mar 16 2017 8:01:03
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    mp7ski - 23 hours ago  » 

    crossroads - 1 hour ago  » 

    bed-bugscouk - 17 hours ago  » 
    I have from time to time found infestations of "tourist" bugs but it is generally not something we look out for. The up side it that they tend to be a lot easier to kill because they have not had the exposure to and thus had time to develop resistance to the products that tend to be available in US, Canada, EU.

    Oh, I actually meant tourists from the west bringing their bedbugs into places like Laos and Vietnam, not the other way round!
    Thanks for the info, guys.

    Just curious, how bad of an infestation did you have in Seattle and how did you escape it?

    I was a hoarder and my place was a dumpster, it was literally like a dumpster teleported into my house the day I left there. I didn't leave that apartment for months and was eating only delivery food. The landlord said he had to "bomb" the place when he kicked me out, it was filthy since I had been hoarding for over 1 year. The bed bugs just fed on me. It was all my fault. It was shameful and I couldn't do anything so I decided to just leave that apartment, fly back to my hometown and paid the sum of 2200 dollars for the cleansing and bed bugs exterminating of my apartment there. The bed bugs and cockroaches were there before I moved into that building inside the walls and I got bit the first day I slept there. I brought the bed bugs back to Viet Nam but none of them survived because I haven't been bit since I got back to Viet Nam nor have I seen the bug. Even though it's been 4 years but sometimes I still feel the "fake" itchiness and the fear while I'm sleeping and the fear that I'll spread the "disease" into other people when I go outside. I don't really know a solution to start it all over but I need to exterminate those insects off my mind so I can sleep because they are the craziest things I have ever experienced.


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