Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

New video and more info about the DIY dry ice bed bug monitors

(30 posts)
  1. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,891

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Dec 27 2009 23:38:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    More information and a video from Jeff White demonstrating the method here.

    If you want to do this, DO read the comments carefully and watch the video. Dry ice has dangers attached to it and you will also need to research how to handle it properly.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  2. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 22:50:31
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey Nobugs,

    I plan on putting the device together over the weekend and using it for the next two weeks to see how easy it is to use, maintain, and everything else. I was wondering something before I used it though - should one be sleeping in the same room that contains one of these DIY monitors? I ask because I know one shouldn't place dry ice in a room that you sleep in - as you'll risk asphyxiation (especially in my case where I have no bed frame, so I'll be closer to the floor then others, which is where CO2 tends to go).

    Any information about how the monitor was used would be helpful in this regard (was it used where a sleeping person was also er... sleeping? Was it close to the bed?), but I intend to use it in my bed room while I stay in my living room, then switch places after a week of use.

    - Newblood.

  3. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,240

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 13:10:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Biology wins over simulators. Sleep elsewhere if the monitor is in play.

    Jim

  4. wchicago

    member
    Joined: Oct '09
    Posts: 268

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 13:18:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yup, in addition to the potential hazards of breathing C02 -- i think this probably mimics at best a large sleeping pet (I know that's what the nightwatch mimics, which this is kinda the DIY version of nightwatch). In other words, i would expect people to give off more "i'm yummy come and get me" bbuggy seductive goodness (scientific terminology) than would a pet or a jug o' dryice on a dogbowl

    so sleeping in another room sounds like a good plan

    i can't wait to hear your update, newblood!

  5. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,957

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 13:37:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The experiment was conducted in occupied apartments that had been visually inspected for bed bugs. The monitor was set up next to the bed or couch.

    I would not be overly concerned about asphyxiation due to 40 oz of dry ice in a small bedroom.

    The amount of CO2 released is less than having another person sleeping in the room.

    If a person sleeps in an air tight coffin, then I would urge caution... otherwise the main issue regarding personal injury is direct skin contact with the dry ice.

    I agree fully with the experts that have raised concerns about young children and mischievous pets making direct contact with dry ice, but would like to assure everyone that the additional CO2 is highly unlikely to adversely affect your health under normal conditions if you are sleeping in the same room.

    I think Jim is right about people being more attractive bait for bed bugs than dry ice, but even if the monitor only catches a single specimen... it is still performing the function of monitoring live activity in the room.

  6. BBcoukHome

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 1,166

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 13:51:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I am currently reviewing monitors, traps and detectors for a new book and have started updating a section on bedbugbeware about them.

    I have been quite specific about the differentiation of the different groups of devices because it really is a case of some products working in combination with others not being suitable to be used together.

    It should be online by Tuesday of next week once I have finished all the inter linking.

    David

  7. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 21:44:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you all for the responses. I'll go forward with the plan and see about getting the remaining parts I need by tomorrow afternoon (got Dry Ice handling gear, painters tape and sandpaper today - tomorrow is the powder, bowl, and jug) and running the device starting Saturday evening. If all goes well it will have been put together and will hopefully be a good indicator if I have the buggies or not!

  8. flabergasted

    member
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 192

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 23:56:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I got new bites and we can't find them. They won't be doing my 3rd spray till January 6 or 7.

    I have everything in the video to assemble this and easy access to dry ice but what about doing it on a room to room basis, ie the living room 1st where I got the bites and and then moving upstairs to the bedrooms and instead of talc put DE in the trap. Any thoughts?

  9. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Dec 31 2009 8:35:43
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey flabergasted,

    I am not a professional, nor used DE before so I can't say for certain, but I think DE will kill the bugs slowly over time. It's not an instant contact killer (I think). As such the monitor's purpose isn't to kill any bugs - it's to let you know that you have them and then you can decide how to go about getting rid of them after you know they're there. The talc powder will make the sides of the bowl slippery - so the bugs can't escape the trap and thus the monitor does just that - monitors.

    I believe placing the trap in each room is what you're supposed to do - although I am not sure as to how long you should leave it in place before moving it to another. I would imagine that if you find a bug in the trap in one room you can pretty much move it to another shortly thereafter. If you don't pick up any bugs though, then I am not sure how long it should be in place. I'm going to attempt a week for my bed room, then a week for my living room, and we'll see what happens.

  10. flabergasted

    member
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 192

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Dec 31 2009 11:39:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I know the info on the traps is yes they work but I am reading so much about the problems people are have using them correctly or bad gas canisters etc. I think you need to have Dave, Doug, KQ or Nobugs tell you which is the optimum room for placement. I have talked to my PCO about it and he was right up front about never using one and having little knowledge about them.

    I have only found them in the living room and one bedroom so I guess that would be the start point. I keep reading the post treatment and success stories and have arrived at one fact let the PCO provide the product and don't go mixing over the counter products mine said DE was okay to lay down but not for 7 days after my spray it is just a backup residue. I don't want to drive them back in but this may be my only option to draw them out I was bite free for 21 days so there is something in that living room. I don't know of a canine inspection service in this city and if one suddenly pops up would be skeptcle of the credentials it is to new to Canada.

    I have access to enough recycle plastic containers the size they are using to build one for each room and just leave it there after releasing the dry ice. I guess the question here now is can you mix DE and talc or just go with the talc and put some DE around the trap? I am going into the office here for a couple hours so I can pull off the Haz Mat sheets on CO2 ratio's in a confined space before it can effect people and I have access to a sniffer.

  11. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 15,666

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Dec 31 2009 13:07:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    I am not familiar with the design but use TALC rather than DE because you want the bed bugs to slip and be immobilised for which TALC has better properties.

    Its all due to the partical size and shape at a molecular level, TALC is flat and slippy where as DE is designed to cut and scratch so must therefore be rough.

    I did have a chat with someone on this subject this morning and it would appear that dry ICE is easier to get hold of in the US than the UK (only 3 or 4 suppliers in the whole country) and there are very onerous controls on those who use it for work purposes so its not an area I will be getting into. The quantities used in a small monitor are not the issue its how you store and transport the bulk quantities in order to use the system daily.

    Personally I am awaiting for someone to simply find a way to slow drip vinegar into bicarbonate of soda as a CO2 source. Sometimes its the kitchen table science that is the most fun.

    I just wish I had more time to do some of the complex math that kicks around in my head when I think about active monitoring although I do have to keep reminding myself that I am contracted to not work on active systems.

    David

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  12. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,957

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Dec 31 2009 13:10:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Each pound of dry ice will produce roughly 250 liters of CO2 depending on the room temperature that you plug into the equation.

    A moderately active human being produces roughly 1.7 cubic feet of CO2 per hour... or 48 liters per hour...

    Forty oz of dry ice would release roughly 625 liters of CO2... which is roughly the equivalent of two human adults sleeping in the room....

  13. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,891

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 2:59:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    flabergasted,

    You'd have to add me to the list of people who have NOT used this trap. And I'm not an expert on any of this, so I would always defer to the experts who work with bed bugs.

    I agree however, that if someone is going to do this, they should follow the directions and use talc to build a trap for detection. We hear DE can take 10 day to kill bed bugs if they come in contact with it. Much better to trap them with the talc so you know they're there.

  14. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 13:48:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey folks. There's been some slight delay - as I am having trouble locating a dry ice seller in southern NJ. None of the super markets I have stopped in or called carry dry ice - but a Jack and Jill Ice Cream Company nearby may do so. Alas they are closed for the weekend so I will give them a shot later on Monday.

    Almost all other parts I have acquired save for the actual jug to use for holding the dry ice. When I have the entire device assembled I'll lay out each individual part, where I bought it, and how much it costs me (included dry ice handling stuff that I thought may be useful). So far I am at roughly $33.00 for the entire set of supplies (minus dry ice and jug so far) so you may want to give serious thought to purchasing that bedbugcentral's kit instead. All told (with ice handling stuff) I'm looking at what will seem to be $55 - 60 dollars.

    More on Monday when I can get into contact with the Jack and Jill Ice Cream Company.

    Keep in mind that I am not a professional exterminator or bed bug expert- I am just a dude who may or may not have bed bugs. If the device doesn't catch any at all after a few weeks of testing I will take this to mean I don't have them - but it may actually mean the device was not working properly (did not attract them, could not keep them in the trap), or they did not go to the device.

    - Newblood.

  15. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,891

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 14:33:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NewBlood,

    Thanks for the report. Have you done any research on how to safely handle dry ice?

  16. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Jan 2 2010 20:49:53
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey NoBugsOnMe.

    I'm no dry ice expert - but I've read up on handling the stuff - a good site to see how to handle dry ice is here: http://www2a.cdc.gov/vaccines/ed/shtoolkit/resources/Handling_Dry_Ice.pdf and here too: http://www.continentalcarbonic.com/dryice/dryicesafety.php

    In addition to the above I believe you should never attempt to break dry ice with a hammer or the like - always purchase it in the form/amount you intend to use it in. Again though - I am not a dry ice handling expert.

    It seems from the directions that oven mitts, or pot holders will work, although I picked up 'thinsulated' gloves and standard work gloves (I will wear both). I still do not intend to pick it up with my hands - I have tongs to do so (assuming that I get bricks of dry ice instead of pellets).

    I believe that it may be possible for me to simply have the company put the dry ice I want into a container for me without having to move it into the jug at a later date. I'll update this with more information assuming I can actually get my hands on (not literally of course) some dry ice.

  17. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 3 2010 1:54:59
    #



    Login to Send PM

    OK, so you're going to contact an ice cream company; I presume it's an i/c manufacturer. They may not sell it to you. In NYC we have chemist shops.

    Does anyone else have any ideas where dry ice could be purchased?

    Chef supplies? High end restaurants use dry ice to make new nouveau cuisine. Wchicago has done that in her/his kitchen, I think.

    flabergasted stated s/he has "easy access" to dry ice. Could you elaborate?

  18. NYDweller

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '09
    Posts: 55

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun Jan 3 2010 4:11:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    what about a small C02 cartridge 4-5 inches long as an alternative to dry ice ? What about opening it slightly and resting it in a homemade holder of some sort, maybe some pieces of wood and being careful not to touch the cartridge when it gets cold? How long do these C02 cartridges release C02 assuming that they can be opened very slightly?

  19. lgvk

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '09
    Posts: 15

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 4 2010 1:03:06
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Looks like you can find a dry ice location through: http://www.dryicedirectory.com/usa.htm

  20. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,891

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 4 2010 1:11:17
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NewBlood,

    I have added your dry ice handling links to the [url=http://bedbugger.com/2009/12/21/effective-cheap-diy-active-bed-bug-monitor/ ]blog post on bedbugger.com.[/url]

    lgvk,

    Wow-- you really can find anything on the internet!

  21. flabergasted

    member
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 192

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Jan 4 2010 10:10:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    bait - 1 day ago  » 
    OK, so you're going to contact an ice cream company; I presume it's an i/c manufacturer. They may not sell it to you. In NYC we have chemist shops.
    Does anyone else have any ideas where dry ice could be purchased?
    Chef supplies? High end restaurants use dry ice to make new nouveau cuisine. Wchicago has done that in her/his kitchen, I think.
    flabergasted stated s/he has "easy access" to dry ice. Could you elaborate?

    I work in a industrial area and knew there were ice plants not far from me. I got on the phone and called ice suppliers in the area I work. On the 2nd call I found a ice manufacture that selles the pellets in 1 kilo bags (2.2 lbs) these would be easier to handle and put in a smaller container like this.

    I also check on my WHIMIS charts did a lot of reading this weekend on the dissipation rate. In a ice chest it is roughly 2.5 to 5 kilo's (5 - 10 pounds) in 24 hours. So with one of these small coolers 1 bag of pellets should last the evening hours. But just remeber this stuff starts to dissipate as soon as it comes out of the freezer so if you pick it up in the afternoon you will loose 1/2 of it by evening and putting it in your deep freeze can cause problems with the internal thermometer where it cuts out.

    Oven mitts are not enough protection on your hands you need to uses insulated gloves - leather palmed work glove with winter rating or putting a winter glove inside would be safe for holding it to pout it in. A good pair of insulated outdoor gloves can run as high as $50. If you can't get pelts then you should wear gloves and use tongs

  22. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 5 2010 0:30:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    OK, so you place 5 to 10 pounds of ice pellets in a cooler, and then you leave it partially open to expel CO2. If you did this for 8 hours, then closed the cooler tight, the DI would last three days. Right?

    Then you store it in a freezer that is about 30 degress F. Would DI somehow exhaust itself, alter or become less productive when stored in a closed container in a conventional freezer?

    What's a 5-10 lb bag of DI cost? Seems to me that if you have to buy a bag of pellets everyday, this system may not be such a good idea. Especially if it could potentially burn out the freezer.

  23. bait

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 559

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 5 2010 0:51:35
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I think my questions have been answered in the other DIY BB monitor thread:

    "The best container to transport and store Dry Ice is an ice chest. It will still sublimate 5 to 10 pounds each 24 hours, so plan to pick up the Dry Ice as close as possible to the time it will be used. Dry Ice is very cold so use insulated gloves to handle it. Do not store Dry Ice in your refrigerator freezer. The extremely cold temperature will cause your thermostat to turn off your freezer. (But it will keep things frozen if your refrigerator breaks down in an emergency.) Do not store Dry Ice in a completely airtight container. The sublimation of Dry Ice to Carbon Dioxide gas will cause any airtight container to expand until a hole opens or it explodes."

    What's a 5-10 lb bag of DI cost? Seems to me that if you have to buy a bag of pellets everyday, this system may not be such a good idea.

  24. flabergasted

    member
    Joined: Nov '09
    Posts: 192

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Jan 5 2010 1:36:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bait you kind of have the idea - you definantely need to transport in a cooler or place in immediately when you get there but it will dissipate "once opened" in the cooler with in 24 hours. If you seal the cooler the escape rate would not give off enough gas to attract the the little buggers in esence you are defeating the purpose of and wasting money. But there is also another chemical out there that I am researching is safer to handle stable and may produce the same effect I just need to find the chemical componet compositions.

    Think of the last time you were clubbing it and they had a fog machine in the club. If it was a dry ice fogger right away it may have caused some breathing issues so people made their way away from the cloud usually used at last call to clear the dance floor. Well when I was a starving student they replace the dry ice fogger with a chemical fogger where the DJ's add a chemical into a water and it has the same effect as dry ice and produces some respritory discomfort in some people but is more tolerated. Prelimanary web hunt shows this has the same CO2 properties as when they manufactures produce dry ice it and press it - it would also be residule in the release area ( I remeber how much the DJ hated cleaning the cannons everyday - "board of health ordered because of poweder residue"). I'll keep everyone posted with what I find or maybe we have a DJ in the group who works with this stuff I am sure it has come along way ifrom the 90"s.

  25. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 12:32:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey everyone,

    I apologize for the delay - house contract woes (illegal septic system discovered) have been a headache for me the past few days. Anyway! I just got off the phone with the Jack and Jill Ice Cream Company near me (kinda near Atlantic City, NJ here in the states). They do sell dry ice to the public, however there are some complications that I need to consider...

    1 - they only sell it in 10 pound bricks (they can break it into smaller chunks though) which run $20.00 each. If this was a one time deal that would be fine but I would be looking to spend $140.00 for a week of use.

    2 - I must bring my own cooler to pick up the ice. I must also hope that the brick slices after they break them into smaller chunks are big enough to fit in the jug (for the trap) I have yet to pick up.

    3 - 10 lbs of Dry Ice will sublime in a day easily. This means that, while I can indeed pick it up at 4:00pm and have enough of it leftover to run the monitor overnight I would be forced to do this everyday and the ice cream place isn't THAT close by (maybe 20 miles away).

    4 - The Jack and Jill company is not open on the weekends so I can only run the trap (assuming they are the only dry ice source in the area which they seem to be unless I want to drive 40 miles) on the weekdays. This means that I will not have a constant source of bait going in the apartment (aside from me of course!).

    All told - if I was to run this monitor for two weeks (remember - I am constructing it myself so I also must consider if I have built it properly or the entire device isn't going to work) it appears that it will cost me $340.00 or so all told (assuming I can somehow get the ice over the weekend from someplace similar). Now if you can find smaller amounts of dry ice cheaply near you, you may not have the same concerns that I am having right now.

    So DIY set up/parts have cost me (including Dry Ice gloves/Tongs) $65.00. A months worth of Dry ice is going to cost me $480.00 if I go the Jack and Jill supplier route - so a grand total of $545.00 or so. Each week past the first month would run me another $120.00 to use.

    In the best 'fictional' case scenario I could get 3 lbs of Dry Ice a day every day for a month (at $2.00 a lb) and I'd be looking at $168.00 a month to operate this trap (so $230ish all told for the first month - IF I could get exactly what I needed). That's not as cheap as I would have thought initially.

    The NightWatch costs about $425 - 475 when you include the costs of the initial CO canister and the month of lures that come with the unit. After which is costs about $13.00 or so per week to operate.

    All told - unless we consumers can acquire dry ice packs at exactly the amount we need (3 lbs) at the time we need it (10:00 at night) I'm going to say that the DIY monitor is just out of the question in my opinion. If I was making alot more money I would consider it, but alas I don't have $500.00 to spend - nor really $168.00 to spend each month (well I do, but a DIY option is supposed to be cheap and this isn't that much cheaper in my opinion). I would rather pay the up front costs of the NightWatch and run that (unless the results of the tests are in overwhelming favor of the DIY kit rather then the CDC3000 or NightWatch monitors).

    - NewBlood!

  26. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 12:39:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Oh - I should add that the above does not include the time it would take me to drive out there, pick up the ice, and transport it back. About an hours worth of time every day for me, as opposed to having the bait/lures delivered via mail, and the CO canister filled once a week.

    The $168.00 above is in the best case scenario per month - in truth it is more like $140.00 a WEEK or $560.00 a month for the DIY monitor. While in truth you only need to run the monitor until you catch a bug (so you may catch one the first night or first week) it's still a concern if not done exactly right or if it's not put in the right place, or the bugs still go for you over the trap, or the bugs decide they're staying inside for the night to watch bedbugtv instead of coming to get you.

  27. JWhiteBBCTV

    member
    Joined: Oct '08
    Posts: 232

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 17:32:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ok, first question, and really the only question, is why are you running it for 2 weeks straight? Is this apartment vacant, occupied, etc...?

    When most companies complete monitoring they are not running it for 2 weeks straight. What is the value of that in regards to what you are trying to achieve? It's tough for me to give you any recommendations in how often you should run it but remember, it's to help determine if you have bugs. It is not definitive. No matter how thorough you are or for how many endless hours you run it, some bugs, hungry or not, may not be attracted to it. If the room is occupied and the bugs are in the bed they may not leave to go to the trap. By running it 2 weeks you are trying to make optimize your chances to catch a bug but even in a perfect world, it may not collect a bug that is there. Also, this is why we recommend the Nightwatch so much. Because it does run for multiple days at a time. Yes it may not be as effective as the dry ice in one night, but over the course of 4 nights it is comparable in regards to detecting infestations (data I can't provide yet).

    I would recommend running it 2-3 times a week for one night at a time for maybe 2 weeks. If you don't turn up a bug in that time frame there's probably a good chance they aren't there.

    And I go all the way back to the original article and my video. This is the exact reason we don't do this from a pest control company perspective. Prices start adding up with dry ice, commuting, the ice subliming, etc... New Blood, yours is a great post of someone starting to run numbers and proof why pest control companies charge what they charge to do the things they do. You think of the trap simplistically and you don't think of all the little things you need to do to make it happen. Also the trap is DIY and intended to be used sporadically. If you do this regularly it does add up due to dry ice.

  28. NewBlood

    member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 185

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 7 2010 19:10:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hey JWhiteBBCTV!

    Whoa, I had no idea it was supposed to be run sporadically! I figured that it would be used like the NightWatch (where it is in place, and run every night for two weeks according to their documentation) and did my comparison based upon that (the nightwatch recommended running it for two weeks in a single spot (bedroom, living room, etc) without moving it to be 99% accurate. With this in mind I will wait to use it until I do see that report.

    I fully know what it's supposed to do (I watched your video 5 times - thanks for posting it by the way sir) so my plan was originally to run it in my bed room for a week, and my living room for a week. If I caught a bug in either place then I could assume I do have bed bugs, if I caught nothing I would assume that either (a) I don't have them or (b) it did not catch any. I agree with you 100% sir - it STILL may not catch a bug that was there, even if I ran it for three months it may not work. Trust me, I know how devilish the little bugs are, and never wanted to give the impression that a 0 bug result would indicate I have no bugs, I think I mentioned that in an earlier post here.

    I figured every night for two weeks straight without me being in the apartment (or in another room) would be optimum to catch a hungry bed bug (since I believe I read they feed once every 3 - 10 days or so). As such I wanted some leeway into when I might be able to catch them. The apartment is occupied by me at the moment, but I was figuring on moving out for a few weeks to see if it caught anything.

    I apologize for giving the total up there as a month's worth of costs (that's a bit unfair I think - especially if one isn't supposed to run the thing for two weeks straight). I was surprised at how quickly it added up. I'm sure that based on the information that is not released yet, running it as you suggest may prove to be a great way to detect them. I hope I stressed that anyone who wants to use this DIY monitor realizes that it MUST be constructed correctly or you may interpret your results (nothing caught) to mean you don't have bed bugs.

    So thanks so much for the post JWhite! If I was confusing in my posts I do apologize - I just wanted to give an update that stated: (1) - The costs add up quickly (if you intended to use it for several months the NightWatch or CDC3000 may be a better option), (2) - It MUST be constructed correctly if it has any hope to function properly (for this reason I recommend the BedBugCentral kit I saw mentioned), and (3) - Just because it didn't catch anything STILL doesn't mean you don't have them.

  29. JWhiteBBCTV

    member
    Joined: Oct '08
    Posts: 232

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Jan 8 2010 12:06:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It's not that it is or isn't intended to be run for 2 weeks straight, it's that it's not financially feasible to do that and you should be able to achieve the same goals by running it 2-3 times a week. If you have the time and money to run it for 2 weeks straight I say make it happen but as your post indicated, it doesn't financially make sense and that doesn't even account for the time investment.

  30. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,891

    offline

    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed Jan 27 2010 14:45:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    New PDF outlining options for detecting bed bugs, including instructions on how to implement this dry ice monitor: "Detecting Bed Bugs Using Bed Bug Monitors," written by Changlu Wang. You can download it for free from the Rutgers website.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

265,567 posts in 43,045 topics over 129 months by 18,887 of 19,446 members. Latest: bugbedder, RDM16, UStraveler1234