Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

New & Improved Beauveria bassiana? Time in the field will tell...

(29 posts)
  1. Canuck

    member
    Joined: Sep '10
    Posts: 381

    offline

    Posted 6 months ago
    Thu Mar 23 2017 21:24:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Penn State and North Carolina State universities have a new and possibly improved fungal biopesticide for bed bug control, with their trials proving effective against bed bug strains that are insecticide resistant. Time in the field, when it gets there, will be the test. Article from Penn State News.

    Sheree Swindle / certified K9-assisted bed bug inspector
  2. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 21,831

    offline

    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Mar 24 2017 0:40:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Interesting!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  3. mp7ski

    member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 551

    offline

    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Mar 24 2017 1:05:53
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Sounds promising but products such as this and dust get to me. If I understand correctly, it's a long term residual product. Basically once you apply it, you can't do anything else such as steam or apply an incecticide or it will compromise the original fungal biopesticide. So you're relying on it to solely control the issue, which I have no doubt it is capable of doing but that's the thing, "control." You'd be basically throwing in the towel and coming to grips with the fact you'll have to live with them and just "control" them.

    I am not an expert, any advice I give should be considered as amateur advice and not taken as fact. I mean well with all my posts and try to give back. If you plan on using any of my advice, I suggest doing research into said advice to make sure it is in your best interest.
    Study on Thermal Death Points(pages 18-29 of pdf) : http://www.propanecouncil.org/uploadedFiles/Council/Research_and_Development/REP_12221%20Efficacy%20of%20Heat%20on%20Bed%20Bugs.pdf
    Study on Cimexa: http://www.pctonline.com/article/pct0814-silica-gel-research-bed-bugs/
  4. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 15,587

    offline

    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Mar 24 2017 5:43:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Lets just hope the new version does not need to be suspended in a petroleum by product to be applied to peoples beds.

    However, the ultimate solution might initially appear to be applying the spores to a material that you fix to the bed. I say initially because when we have tried similar approaches in the past the reality was that it worked no better at managing the problem than when we tried it without the additive.

    I guess I am not a huge fan of doing things that are just not needed.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  5. Livingagain

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 516

    offline

    Posted 6 months ago
    Fri Mar 24 2017 7:31:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yay! A new tool! I've been hoping they'd rework this and rerelease it. If it works it will be nice to have something that doesn't work on the same weakness that the bugs have started to build resistance to.

    @mp7ski Nice to see you back here. I hope things are going well. I think with this since it works on a different weakness of the bed bugs you'll be able to treat with this first, and kill everything you can with this; then you can treat with other treatments that we have had before to kill off the stragglers. It won't matter if you compromise the fungi, if you've already gotten all the killing out of it that you're going to get.

  6. mp7ski

    member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 551

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Mar 25 2017 18:50:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    barelyliving - 1 day ago  » 
    Yay! A new tool! I've been hoping they'd rework this and rerelease it. If it works it will be nice to have something that doesn't work on the same weakness that the bugs have started to build resistance to.
    @mp7ski Nice to see you back here. I hope things are going well. I think with this since it works on a different weakness of the bed bugs you'll be able to treat with this first, and kill everything you can with this; then you can treat with other treatments that we have had before to kill off the stragglers. It won't matter if you compromise the fungi, if you've already gotten all the killing out of it that you're going to get.

    I wouldn't say I'm back, I just pop in every once in a while when I have a freak out moment, it calms me a bit. Wasnt liking the way I was obsessing with this site and the way i was acting on here. Still having an issue although cimexa is controlling it for now. Just living day by day and trying to work towards my end goal.

  7. bugged-cdn

    member
    Joined: Jul '14
    Posts: 383

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Mar 25 2017 20:31:06
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I was thinking about you as well and wondering how things were going, mp7ski. Glad to hear the Cimexa is making a difference.

  8. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Mon Mar 27 2017 20:32:45
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Always good to see innovation at work.
    The website for the commercial spin off is
    http://www.aprehend.com

  9. Ombugsman

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '17
    Posts: 118

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Mar 30 2017 12:17:48
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks Sheree and Crossroads for the links. I contacted one of the researchers to obtain additional information. Here is more stuff I learned:

    - Kills eggs
    - Kills bugs even if it only gets on their legs
    - Tested on many different surfaces against non-resistant strains but only one for resistant strain
    - Not affected by humidity
    - Safe to place on floor around bed
    - Confirmed efficacy/speed not affected by the amount or exposure time
    - Confirmed transfer effect of bugs bringing back spores to harborage and killing other bed bugs there

    This product appears to check all the boxes and has some advantages over CimeXa. Its main disadvantage appears to be that it takes longer for the bugs to die (5+ days) after they step in it. Of course, we won't know the real deal until it's available for independent testing and PCOs/DIYers use it to treat infestations.

    I'm sure the company had its reasons for making public the efficacy studies and advantages of the product. But given the many vested interests in the industry, I worry a "contribution" might delay EPA approval. Since clean air and water don't appear to be an EPA priority at this time, I doubt a promising bedbug product will make it through.

  10. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Mar 30 2017 12:43:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Great info Ombugsman, thanks.
    Am I right in thinking that (if validated in the field!!) the harbourage poisoning and cross-infection aspect would make it the first ever "trackback" bedbug poison? Like the excellent Terro Bait for ants. Or have there been others already?

  11. FayeState

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '15
    Posts: 677

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Mar 30 2017 12:53:48
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I read it is suppose to be released in 2017. Here's an article on it: https://scienceblog.com/493078/bedbugs-beware-new-research-may-beat-back-bedbug-epidemic-2/

  12. Ombugsman

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '17
    Posts: 118

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Thu Mar 30 2017 13:53:34
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Crossroads Wrote: Am I right in thinking that (if validated in the field!!) the harbourage poisoning and cross-infection aspect would make it the first ever "trackback" bedbug poison?

    This surprised me but this study found that CimeXa worked in this way:

    Quote From Study: We also evaluated the horizontal transfer effect of the silica gel dust. Silica gel dust-exposed bed bugs transferred the dust horizontally to unexposed bed bugs resulting in 100% mortality at 4:6 donor: recipient ratio and 88.0 ± 5.0% mortality at 1:5 donor: recipient ratio.

    They didn't test other dusts. I've never read of this effect regarding chemical pesticides but it may be possible.

    ****

    Faye wrote: I read it is suppose to be released in 2017.

    From the article:

    Jenkins said the goal is to have Aprehend on the market and in the hands of professional pest controllers sometime in 2017.

    EPA is the agency which has primary responsibility for bedbugs in general (not just product approval) so I have no doubt that long time employees there will want to expedite approval and the product does appear to be well along in that process. I guess I'm just more pessimistic than most people. There's a new head of the EPA and it wouldn't be difficult to slow the process if some large corporations with vested interests give money to certain politicians or organizations. CimeXa is already cutting into the revenues of these companies; I would think the last thing they want is a product which might be even better than CimeXa on the market. I hope I'm wrong about this.

  13. FayeState

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '15
    Posts: 677

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Fri Mar 31 2017 23:10:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It sounds like a great product. However, it says it kills 95.5 percent to 99 percent within 14 days. Are the rest killed after 14 days - anyone know?

  14. FayeState

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '15
    Posts: 677

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Fri Mar 31 2017 23:15:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It sounds like a great product. However, it says it kills 95.5 percent to 99 percent within 14 days. Are the rest killed after 14 days - anyone know?

  15. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 1 2017 3:52:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    FayeState - 4 hours ago  » It sounds like a great product. However, it says it kills 95.5 percent to 99 percent within 14 days. Are the rest killed after 14 days - anyone know?

    The original scientific paper
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ps.4576/pdf via
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ps.4576/abstract
    just says

    Mortality across all four bed bug strains exposed to B. bassiana-treated substrates was 99.0 ± 0.7% in 2014 and 95.5 ± 1.4% in 2015 by the end of the 14-day monitoring period (overall survivorship: 2.5 ± 0.8%) (Fig. 1).

    So they make no claim about what happens after 14 days.

    However, a preliminary 2012 paper from the same researchers at
    https://www.moldbacteria.com/wp-content/uploads/potential-of-beauveria-bassiana-for-bed-bug-control.pdf
    suggests that re-treatments would catch any stragglers:

    In a couple of assays 5–8% of individuals did not die, but re-expo-
    sure of these few survivors resulted in infection and mortality (re-
    sults not shown), suggesting sub-optimal pick up of spores
    (especially from the paper substrate) rather than any physiological
    resistance.

  16. Ombugsman

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '17
    Posts: 118

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Mon Apr 3 2017 21:14:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Extra Extra Read All About It. Aprehend just received EPA approval. It now begins the process of applying for registration in each individual state.

  17. FayeState

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '15
    Posts: 677

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Mon Apr 3 2017 23:09:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Great news. How did you find out?

  18. mp7ski

    member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 551

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Apr 4 2017 3:18:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    This product is really intriguing. Especially the part where bugs that didn't die from initial exposure did after being exposed a second time which points to it being more along the lines of not being exposed enough to the product initially instead of it being some sort of resistance. Hope it works in the field just as good as it did in the lab.

  19. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Tue Apr 4 2017 5:39:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Great news about the EPA approval, Ombugsman.
    I just noticed this report from a few weeks back saying the EPA was planning to approve:

    https://www.agra-net.com/agra/agrow/approvals-launches/us-epa-to-ok-conidio-tecs-aprehend--1.htm

    The US EPA has proposed the approval of US biopesticide company Conidio Tec’s bioinsecticide, Aprehend (Beauveria bassiana strain GHA), for the control of bed bugs in buildings and structures.

    So I guess all the renewed publicity over the last few weeks was cos the Aprehend ppl knew approval was on the way...

  20. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Wed Apr 5 2017 21:14:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Confirmation of what Ombugsman said: Aprehend have updated their website...

    Old site in google cache, 7 march:
    http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache%3Awww.aprehend.com&oq=cache%3Awww.aprehend.com
    Permalink: http://archive.is/S7Q9V
    says
    "Sales pending full EPA registration approval. "

    Current site:
    http://www.aprehend.com/
    says
    "Sales pending state by state registration. "

  21. Ombugsman

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '17
    Posts: 118

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sat Apr 8 2017 19:30:21
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Here is the link to Aprehend's product label:

    https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem_search/ppls/089186-00001-20170327.pdf

    It's applied as a spray at low volume application rates and a respirator is required during application. Repeated exposure to the product may cause "allergic sensitization". I was hoping Aprehend might eventually be an off-the shelf product someone could buy at the local hardware store or supermarket but the respirator requirement is a warning shot.

    In fact, it's worse than that - I think only licensed professionals will able to buy the product directly. There's this quote from a 2014 article: "When approved, it will be on the market for licensed pesticide distributors. It will not be available to the general public". And then there's this quote from a recent article: "Jenkins said the goal is to have Aprehend on the market and in the hands of professional pest controllers sometime in 2017". I wrote the company asking them if this is true and, if so, why there is this restriction since the chemical pesticide Transport GHP may be bought directly by non-licensed pros in 46 out of 50 states. Does the EPA require that a microbial pesticide be sold only through licensed professionals or is it Conidio Tec's decision to only sell directly to licensed pros? I couldn't find Beauveria on the NYS restricted ingredients list and a Beauveria product called BotaniGuard may be bought directly by consumers. I've received no response to my inquiry from Conidia.

    This could be especially important if one intends to use Aprehend as a preventative tool. The product label says it will remain effective for 3 months so residents might have a routine where they reapply it quarterly. But how are they gonna reapply it if they're not able to buy it directly? Pay a PCO every quarter? I'm hoping that the restriction is a temporary one perhaps due to limited initial supply while they gauge demand or because they think it's better that only pros apply it for a while before making it available directly to consumers.

  22. mp7ski

    member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 551

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sun Apr 9 2017 6:14:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ombugsman - 10 hours ago  » 
    Here is the link to Aprehend's product label:
    https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem_search/ppls/089186-00001-20170327.pdf
    It's applied as a spray at low volume application rates and a respirator is required during application. Repeated exposure to the product may cause "allergic sensitization". I was hoping Aprehend might eventually be an off-the shelf product someone could buy at the local hardware store or supermarket but the respirator requirement is a warning shot.
    In fact, it's worse than that - I think only licensed professionals will able to buy the product directly. There's this quote from a 2014 article: "When approved, it will be on the market for licensed pesticide distributors. It will not be available to the general public". And then there's this quote from a recent article: "Jenkins said the goal is to have Aprehend on the market and in the hands of professional pest controllers sometime in 2017". I wrote the company asking them if this is true and, if so, why there is this restriction since the chemical pesticide Transport GHP may be bought directly by non-licensed pros in 46 out of 50 states. Does the EPA require that a microbial pesticide be sold only through licensed professionals or is it Conidio Tec's decision to only sell directly to licensed pros? I couldn't find Beauveria on the NYS restricted ingredients list and a Beauveria product called BotaniGuard may be bought directly by consumers. I've received no response to my inquiry from Conidia.
    This could be especially important if one intends to use Aprehend as a preventative tool. The product label says it will remain effective for 3 months so residents might have a routine where they reapply it quarterly. But how are they gonna reapply it if they're not able to buy it directly? Pay a PCO every quarter? I'm hoping that the restriction is a temporary one perhaps due to limited initial supply while they gauge demand or because they think it's better that only pros apply it for a while before making it available directly to consumers.

    I imagine it will be available online in the same way Temprid and other pesticides are. It just won't be available on store shelves. A lot of pesticides are labeled as professional use only yet are available to buy online to anyone. I have a hard time seeing a product like this only available to PCOs, yet temprid and other more toxic chemicals are available to anyone.

  23. mp7ski

    member
    Joined: Dec '16
    Posts: 551

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sun Apr 9 2017 6:26:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It be nice if the EPA approved this soon as I'd much rather use this as a preventative when I move compared to chemicals and dusts.

  24. Livingagain

    senior member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 516

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sun Apr 9 2017 7:46:53
    #



    Login to Send PM

    It is approved. Now it needs to work its way into the hands of pros.

  25. Ombugsman

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '17
    Posts: 118

    offline

    Posted 5 months ago
    Sun Apr 9 2017 8:39:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I imagine it will be available online in the same way Temprid and other pesticides are. It just won't be available on store shelves...I'd much rather use this as a preventative when I move compared to chemicals and dusts.

    One would think that would be the case but the website talks about it as a "professional" product and mentions prevention in the context of a hotel not a homeowner. I sent the eMail to the same researcher who responded to my previous query (I saw somewhere where she's also the President of Conidia.). Why not just reply that it will be available through sites like domyownpestcontrol.com? One sentence. I even stated this would be my last question and I wouldn't bother her any more (I had only sent one email before).

    Now it needs to work its way into the hands of pros

    ...and DIYers even more so. CimeXa did not become popular because of pros using it - quite the opposite. Potter's landmark extensive field test validated it and DIYers picked up on that and started using it. They then posted their results on various distributor sites like domywonpestcontrol. The Potter study and the DIY feedback then led those sites to recommend it to bed bug victims and include it in all of their "kits". I know this is heresy but the most efficient way to know if a product is effective is through DIYers so long as it is safe. Remember PCOs have a vested financial interest in a simple, effective spray product NOT becoming too successful to where it could be used by average homeowners to rid themselves of bed bugs in the same way they use a product like boric acid to take care of a waterbug problem.

  26. crossroads

    junior member
    Joined: Oct '16
    Posts: 105

    offline

    Posted 4 months ago
    Sat Apr 29 2017 0:03:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Via Aprehend's news page, a report on PA local TV news station WJAC on the launch of the product:

    https://youtu.be/iPUvD3iNwD8

    Pleased to hear from her flat vowels that the lead researcher is a Brit.

  27. CrystalBlue

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '17
    Posts: 1

    offline

    Posted 2 months ago
    Thu Jul 13 2017 7:12:33
    #



    Login to Send PM

    In case anyone is interested in the EPA's approval, and how this fungus works to kill other bed bugs that don't come into direct contact with the fungus

    https://www3.epa.gov/pesticides/chem_search/ppls/089186-00001-20170327.pdf

    http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/moth_diamondback_caterpillar

  28. millermj

    newbite
    Joined: Jul '17
    Posts: 7

    offline

    Posted 1 month ago
    Tue Jul 25 2017 3:09:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    FayeState - 3 months ago  » 
    It sounds like a great product. However, it says it kills 95.5 percent to 99 percent within 14 days. Are the rest killed after 14 days - anyone know?

    I arrived at this site while researching this product and have spent the last 6 hours perusing the forums. I am working on a graduate paper that addresses the bed bug problem in property management, and I am so overwhelmed with all the information. That being said:

    Those numbers used are 2 (95.5) and 3 (99.7) standard deviations. If you are not familiar with statistical data, you have probably at least heard of the Bell Curve, or 'grading on a curve' from school. 100% is never achievable, because it is not realistic in the real world. Anything beyond 3 standard deviations is considered an extreme outlier. According to those results, the product is *extremely* effective. I'm not sure about the details of the experiment, but those numbers immediately stood out to me.

    Another example is IQ measurement: the mean is 100, with +-15 spread, so 85-115 represents 68% of the population. 70-130 represents 95% of the population. 97.7% of the population is 55-145 (I guess theoretically at least).

    You can read more about it at Wikipedia, but why would you subject yourself to that torture?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/68%E2%80%9395%E2%80%9399.7_rule

    Regards

  29. jimdavis

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '17
    Posts: 8

    offline

    Posted 1 month ago
    Wed Jul 26 2017 2:05:07
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I posted on a different thread but thought I should ask here because I noticed this is the main active Bb thread on bedbugger, and that made me wonder if this was where I should have posted.

    With "Aprehend" recently approved by the EPA (though not actually registered for sale by state yet), what does that mean in terms of how much safety testing they did? Did they do additional safety / site testing, with the Aprehend formulation specifically, or does this just mean they did a thorough review of the testing that had already been done in the outdoor formulation of Bb? Either way, how does one get at / see the safety testing data? I looked at the product brochure, and was surprised to see the indoor application includes spraying on surfaces like baseboards and fabric-- I'd assume they had to do additional testing to justify that. Also, how long does it generally take to get a new pesticide registered by state?

    Best wishes,


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

263,758 posts in 42,641 topics over 128 months by 18,716 of 19,249 members. Latest: scaredgirlbk, Jb3566, HoneyPunch