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Nature pub - unique adaptive strategy to resist pyrethroid insecticides 14-3-13

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  1. buggybrained

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 15 2013 14:16:33
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    I thought this study was very interesting!

    http://www.kyforward.com/2013/03/uk-entomologists-make-key-discovery-about-insecticide-resistance-in-problematic-bed-bugs/

    The article on a KY website has the link to the Nature publication that you can read if you like. The fact they are hopefully beginning to understand why these critters are becoming resistant to the common insecticides being used may be helping to develop other strategies and new formulas in controlling them.

    It seems interesting that there is a lot of focus on bed bugs developing resistance to insecticides and bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics. I wonder if there is some way to use one to help understand the other. Hmm.

    I feel like I'm becoming more fascinated by bed bugs rather than fearful of them. I just have a feeling that there is a lot we're going to learn from them somehow.

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 15 2013 15:13:00
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    Hi,

    You can access the full paper here:

    http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130314/srep01456/full/srep01456.html

    Reading it now.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 15 2013 15:45:22
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    Hi,

    OK its an awesome paper if you happen to be able to follow detailed molecular biology methods to 100% understand. Its my first degree subject so apart from adapting to the advances made over the last 10 years it had more of a heavy regional accent than being a foreign language.

    Not much of a take home for people other than when resistance occurs it is more likely to have multiple modes of action than a single mechanism. This in itself means that future products will need to be smarter with multiple modes of action and that Mr Darwin's theories certainly play out on a molecular level with bedbugs.

    As a long term advocate of the principle of avoid where you can and early detect when you cant, this paper certainly gives indirect support to the concept as frankly when things get complex, they get dramatically more complex than the roll of a dice could predict.

    I cant help but feel that one of the best future predicting models to look at will be the role of antibiotic resistance genes within modern healthcare and as such tightening up on dosage and application before the horse bolts would at least give more time for new classes to be investigated or alternative approaches adopted.

    Those who are seriously interested in the subject should have a read of the paper but if you are more anxious about bedbugs I would not suggest having a bash.

    David

  4. buggybrained

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Mar 15 2013 22:05:18
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    Glad you found the paper interesting, David!

    Yes, I agree it's not much of a layperson publication however since I work dealing with science grants and proposals and am a bio major undergrad (perpetually) I really enjoyed reading this. Entomology wasn't something I really studied but I think I do have a soft spot for the less popular creatures. I was involved a little with bat rescue and rehabilitation which caused more then a few "ewww gross" screeches from people I know!

    Necessity being the mother of invention and all that, maybe the bed bug reboot along with their incredible evolution to survive and adapt will hopefully lead to some pretty exciting discoveries. Cool stuff indeed!


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