Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

my dog

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  1. jennifer09

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Nov 16 2007 23:03:49
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    hi,
    so i have a dog and i had her at my mom's while my place got PCO'd for the first time. i just brought her back to my apt. yesterday. can she be bringing the bugs out when i take her out for a walk? anybody have experience w/dogs and bugs? and how to deal with this?

  2. currentinsomniac

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Nov 16 2007 23:43:08
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    Dogs are chomped on as much as humans are and dogs can carry those bugs to wherever they go. (As we sometimes can on our clothes). In fact, there may be the possibility that the dog was not the only visitor to your mom's house. (scary) (I would recommend having her take necessary precautions...vacuuming, etc.)
    I'm not aware of all that you can do in regards to dogs and bugs....except perhaps baths, vacuuming, and carefully and safely treating around where your dog sleeps or likes to lay most. You can find out the safety of the pesticides used from your PCO.
    One product that many people choose to use to help prevent/get rid of bed bugs (if they have young children or animals) is diatomaceous earth (DE). It is a powder that resembles flour or thick dust. It is not good if inhaled, but if you purchase the FOOD-GRADE DE (which is actually used in many products we regularly use like toothpaste) it should be safe to use around your dog. If that's something you might be interested in, google it and find out some more.

  3. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Nov 17 2007 5:41:36
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    Jennifer
    Although it is possible for a bed bug to be found on a dog. Lt Dan found one on his dog, but I don't believe that it is a common event. The foot of a bed bug is formed differently than the foot of a flea which is adapted for moving through fur. Bed bugs will feed on an animal, but usually return to their harborage after feeding.

    A bed bug travels more like a roach. Bed bugs don't jump like a flea, fly like a mosquito or adhere to skin like a tick. Bed bugs prefer surfaces like textiles, cardboard, wood or paper to fur on a live animal.

    I have been experimenting with a cedar oil spray that is labeled for fleas & bed bugs. It can be added to dog shampoo. The company that make the product claims that it acts as a repellent for a limited time & kills bed bugs on contact. I spray myself & my dog with the spray before & after we enter a potentially infested building.

    Otherwise bathing, brushing or flea combing could be used to physically remove any hitchhikers. On people bed bugs are usually reported to be clinging to clothing which I believe is a much more common event.

  4. Bugologist

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Nov 17 2007 13:56:27
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    First off to say dogs get "chomped" on as much as humans isn't known. There is no scientific data on host preference. We know dogs are an alternate food source and I've watched one feed on a cats foot but you put yourself in a bed bugs mind and think would I rather feed on a human or dog? Dogs are covered in hair and don't have a lot of places that are easy to access skin. Humans for the most part are hairless (although my wife might disagree when she looks at me) and probably a much easier source.

    I agree with the previous post that bed bugs will most likely not hitch hike on a dog. Keep in mind that a lot of repellants aren't made for dogs since they have a different type of skin then humans (wife is a vet). I, just like a lot of other people, sprayed my dogs down with insect repellants prior to marrying my wife and hearing her say that but she did say it's probably not a great idea.

  5. goingaway

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Nov 17 2007 20:12:23
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    QUESTION: Does anyone know...
    Would flea/tick baths help kill bedbugs? Regular baths?
    I was thinking of having my cat professionally bathed at the vets when we move.
    I know the bugs don't prefer (afaik) to eat pets, but I don't think they prefer to eat backpacks, coats, walls, or laptops either, and yet there they are found.
    Thanks for any info or experience you may have.

  6. bugobsessed

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Nov 18 2007 1:14:20
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    I brought my cats to the groomer the first time my apartment was treated. I figured between the bath and then being brushed anything on them would be removed. Now I dust them with food grade DE. My thought is that if any bugs get on them they'll be dusted too. Not sure if this actually works, but it certainly makes me feel better.

  7. (deleted)

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sun Nov 18 2007 2:40:41
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    The subject has come up before and was well addressed here, with good posts by K9 handler and others: http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/739

  8. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 19 2007 8:26:42
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    Goingaway

    The locations where bed bugs feed (hosts) are different from the locations where they hide (harborages).

  9. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 19 2007 11:24:57
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    Bugologist, to hell with scientific data on host preference. My dog had many bites on her belly (approx. 75) as many bites as my wife did. We hear that bbs will feast on mice and birds, my guess is that it really does not matter once an infestation grows to a certain level. I say blood is blood for a hungry bb. I have read data that at the turn of the century businessmen would travel with a small pig with hopes that during an overnight stay the bbs would go for the pig and not the man.

    Doug, I am impressed that you remember my reply. Can you tell us what is this cedar spray that you use? I use lavendar that is made by a company that makes cedar spray.

    A year ago much data suggested that bbs have a difficult time climbing metal so metal beds were recommended. Now we know that they can get up metal too, in fact some site has a picture of a nest of bbs inside a metal bed post. I have seen one crawl down a wall that was painted with enamel gloss paint and it appeared to be a simple task for the bb.

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Mon Nov 19 2007 15:03:10
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    I suspect Doug is talking about cedarcide. I have not been able to find any test data. I'd like to see some actual information (OR hear that Doug reports back--after all, we learned of other things that killed bed bugs, like Murphy's oil soap, through people who tried them.)

    LtDan, we still recommend metal bed frames here, esp. for people who want to isolate beds, but that's because wood--especially cheaply constructed "wooden" furniture-- seems to offer more opportunities for infestation. (Some metal beds do too.)

    ps Dan--PMs are down. I saw you sent a message but can't read it at this time. Feel free to email me: nobugs at bedbugger.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  11. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Tue Nov 20 2007 12:40:04
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    Nobugsonme,
    I believe that metal is still better than wood and when I said that a year ago much data suggested that bbs have a difficult time climbing metal so metal beds were recommended. I meant that many sites were mentioning metal beds not just bedbugger and it was not until months later that I understood that the little bastards can climb metal also.

  12. angie

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Nov 21 2007 11:34:33
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    I had to comment on bb's feasting on pets. I have a short haired dog who sleeps on the floor with the rest of us and she has as many bites, if not more than we do in the a.m. I give her flea bathes monthly and groom her daily. I have never seen any bugs on her but I know that she is food for the little pests. Although the "experts" disagree with me. The exterminator doesn't believe me and suggests fleas. Riley has never had fleas and I am not that stupid that I don't know the difference between fleas and bed bugs. Unfortunately, I feel like I know too much about bed bugs.


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