Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Bed Bug Treatment

MOTHBALLS

(13 posts)
  1. itchynscratchy

    junior member
    Joined: May '08
    Posts: 67

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue May 27 2008 21:58:01
    #



    Login to Send PM

    My PCO (one of the top-rated NYC agencies) says their entymologist ran tests and mothball fumes kill begbugs encased in bags for a few days. This is what he wants me to do with all my kid's toys and luggage and books, etc. Why havent' we heard more about mothballs? This is a very reputable company!

  2. Gypsy

    junior member
    Joined: May '08
    Posts: 108

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue May 27 2008 22:15:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    My mum claimed a few years back, she was bit by bugs but couldn't see or find them to ever prove it. My dad, and the rest of us never got bit. So she went crazy, cleaning the house, and stored moth balls afterwards. Said she never got bit again after that. I can't say for sure it works for bed bugs, but does work for things like moths, fleas...I'd still do full treatment with the PCO.

  3. itchynscratchy

    junior member
    Joined: May '08
    Posts: 67

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue May 27 2008 23:07:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I just can't understand why there isn't more info on mothballs if one of the big NYC pest control operations is using them.

  4. thebedbugresource

    old timer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 594

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 0:56:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Moth balls are EXTREMELY dangerous to your health.

  5. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,060

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 10:05:23
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Mothballs, you say, well the label says no. Big problem is the vapors which are not fit for human inhalation. Old time steamer trunks may have been mini gas chambers for moth larvae but uses for bed bugs me thinks not. Kids don't try this at home !!!

  6. parakeets

    oldtimer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 1,011

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 12:19:58
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I was told at the First International Bedbug Symposium in Herndon VA (by an expert entomologist) that you could use mothballs for bedbugs in this manner: When you put stuff into a plastic bag and seal it, throw a few mothballs in. It's an extra precaution you can take to make sure any bedbugs don't survive.

  7. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,060

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 13:09:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I'm not saying that there are no technical uses nor am I addressing it's effectiveness. What I am saying is that there is no labeled use of mothballs for this or as squirrel repellents. Yes in the right concentrations it could have some uses, but can this be achieved in a safe manner? Especially in urban apartment/multiple family dwellings.
    Perhaps left to professionals in some commercial settings, but the misuse by the general public years ago along with a lack of professional respect for some products has caused
    over zealous folks to ban and legislate against a number of materials which could be used today even as restricted use materials.

  8. Scarafaggio

    junior member
    Joined: May '08
    Posts: 47

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 14:22:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I've also found Moth balls to be effective against bedbugs if the containment is airtight. But mothballs are not harmless simply because of their ubiquity. Both naphthalene and paradichlorbenzene are volatile chemicals with potential health risks (especially the organochlorine paradichlorbenzene).

    The label problems are another issue. Although federal and most state laws allow pesticides to be used for off-label pests, they must be used in a manner consistent with their labeling. This basically means that you can use an insecticide against an off-label insect if all of the following are true:

    1. The product is applied using the method prescribed.
    2. It is used at a label-specified dosage rate.
    3. It is used at a label-specified site.
    4. In the case of gases, it is used on label-specified commodities.

    Moth ball labels usually mention steamer trunks, vaults, and often plastic bags as suitable containments, but limit the "commodity" to clothing or other textiles. So there actually would be no violation if you treated clothing or other textiles for bedbugs assuming you otherwise followed the label instructions. But papers would stretch the definition of "textiles" beyond the breaking point.

    As for toys... simply stated, no -- especially not with paradichlorbenzene. Use heat, cold, drowning, or some other method.

    -Scarafaggio

  9. monroe

    newbite
    Joined: Feb '08
    Posts: 23

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 17:35:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    In New York State it is definitely a no no to use any pesticide for anything other than what's specifically on the label; NO OFF LABEL PESTS!!!

  10. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,060

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu May 29 2008 8:47:01
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Yes NY seems to be one of those states with a strong lobby in favor of pests, under a guise of protection / environmental conservation. In other states professionals have a greater arsenal to deal with these little vampyres. In fact NYC under LL37 is even more restrictive, based on a notion of over protection with regulations that were enacted on
    wide use of organophosphate insecticides which were no longer in use by the time it was enacted. Faulty legislation based on outdated information. Long live bed bugs!

  11. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,049

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Aug 26 2008 22:22:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Assured Environments recommends mothballs for electronics. I'm curious re ("old fashioned") napthalene vs. paradichlorobenzene. Don't these risk corroding the gear, though. Oddly enough, naphtalene was and is an "active ingredient" at my parents' home. Growing up, too much was never enough. Murphy is popular at Mom & Dad's, too. Wonder if these will help us in our hour of need.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  12. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,049

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Aug 26 2008 22:27:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    monroe - 3 months ago  » 
    In New York State it is definitely a no no to use any pesticide for anything other than what's specifically on the label; NO OFF LABEL PESTS!!!

    How about I drop my electronics in a bin, my sweater and then the mothballs?

  13. death2allbbs

    member
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 158

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Aug 28 2008 0:58:09
    #



    Login to Send PM

    cilecto - 1 day ago  » 
    Assured Environments recommends mothballs for electronics. I'm curious re ("old fashioned") napthalene vs. paradichlorobenzene. Don't these risk corroding the gear, though. Oddly enough, naphtalene was and is an "active ingredient" at my parents' home. Growing up, too much was never enough. Murphy is popular at Mom & Dad's, too. Wonder if these will help us in our hour of need.

    Even though, I normally stay away from moth balls because of the health risks, I think that this is an interesting tropic. Also, I purchased a package of Enoz Moth-Tek Paper Covered moth ball packets this evening and I was thinking that the paper cover might ad and extra layer of protection with a person's clothes and I was also thinking that these paper covered ones might prevent the corrosion of electronic gear. BTW, the active ingredient in the covered packets is paradichlorobenzene:

    http://www.willert.com/prodcatdetail.asp?LineID=3&CatID=2


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.