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Life cycle--how long after hatching do they lay more eggs?

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  1. Shellebrity

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    Joined: Sep '17
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    Posted 1 week ago
    Mon Nov 13 2017 23:29:09
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    Long story short: we had two chemical treatments, were told they didn't find any live bugs, then kept getting bites and found more. Today was our second treatment of the second time around, and live bugs were found yesterday and today by tenants (report from PCO has not yet been received). We would theoretically get another treatment two weeks from today, but I'm curious how long after hatching can the BBs lay their own eggs. As in, if an egg hatched tomorrow and isn't affected by the chemicals from today, when would it lay its own eggs? I'm worried that there's always going to be more eggs laid before the next treatment and it'll never end!!

  2. loubugs

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Tue Nov 14 2017 8:57:05
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    Shellebrity - 9 hours ago  » 
    Long story short: we had two chemical treatments, were told they didn't find any live bugs, then kept getting bites and found more. Today was our second treatment of the second time around, and live bugs were found yesterday and today by tenants (report from PCO has not yet been received). We would theoretically get another treatment two weeks from today, but I'm curious how long after hatching can the BBs lay their own eggs. As in, if an egg hatched tomorrow and isn't affected by the chemicals from today, when would it lay its own eggs? I'm worried that there's always going to be more eggs laid before the next treatment and it'll never end!!

    Bed bugs hatch from eggs, go through 5 immature stages, feeding in each one. Then adult stages of male and female. These are able to feed many times. Mating occurs. Egg deposited over time and requires additional blood meals and mating for more to be produced. A few hundred eggs (200/300 in lifetime of adult) that can cover months. Temperature dependent- warmer and life cycle shortened. General time and under best conditions about 6 weeks from egg to adult. So your issue is a problem with treatment or new introductions of bugs. Maybe preparation instructions are wrong or not being followed by tenants. Residual chemicals of various sorts would take care of any eggs that hatch and give rise to first instar nymph stage.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  3. HifromChi

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Nov 16 2017 13:57:53
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    Hi Lou, I'm happy to see something substantiated regarding bed bugs feeding and how it can potentially affect their populations. Someone here stated that bed bugs having regular access to blood meals in no way directly affects their numbers and I knew from reading other posts regarding this topic, that was potentially wrong.

    If you can keep them from feeding more regularly using climb-ups on beds and furniture, sticky traps and bed isolation, while attacking the problem with treatments like steam heat, powders and residual sprays, then you can disrupt their life cycles and keep them from maturing far enough before they can lay eggs, hopefully killing them before they get that far. I'm hoping I understand that right, there's a lot of conflicting info on that topic that floats around.


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