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Lice spray?

(6 posts)
  1. Allison44

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 15 2009 12:15:11
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    I read on another thread (sorry, forget which) that someone used lice spray in conjunction with treatments, etc. I was thinking about picking up a can on the way home from work to use until I get a PCO in. It has as an ingredient Permethrin 0.50%.

    Thoughts? Any successes?

  2. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 15 2009 12:31:27
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    The chemical you ask about is specifically listed as a chemical not to be used for mattress treatment on this website, which is a university sponsored one, not one from a PCO:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IG083

    As a result, I would be very wary about using it for general killing of bed bugs.

    I should also note that permethrin is in the category of pyrethroids, which is a group of chemicals that we know some bed bug populations have developed resistance to:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permethrin

    So it might not make the problem much better. I am not a chemist or a PCO, so I can't tell you off the top of my head whether it's one of the chemicals that has a repellent effect on bed bugs. A repellent effect sounds like a good thing, but basically, it would drive the infestation deeper and make it harder to treat.

    If you're looking for a contact killer, 91% rubbing alcohol and/or Murphy's Oil soap both work just fine and are cheaper than lice killers. Obviously, be aware that the 91% isopropyl alcohol (not the more common 70%) will make some plastics sticky and melty (for lack of a better technical term). Test is on small areas of such items before using. And obviously, it's highly flammable. I used a spray bottle to disburse mine, so esp. don't spray that near open flames and don't light up a cigarette while you're using it. Murphy's Oil Soap is good for use on wood items that would get dried out by using the alcohol.

  3. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 15 2009 12:34:04
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    I swear I typed in a response, but I'm not sure if the spam filter ate it or my computer just had a moment.

    Short version: no. Permethrin isn't labeled for use on mattresses, and it's a pyrethroid, which we know some bed bugs have resistance to.

    If you're looking for a contact killer to tide you over, I'd look at 91% isopropyl alcohol (which is highly flammable, so use common sense about no flames when spraying) and/or Murphy's Oil Soap. The former (alcohol) must be 91%, not the more common 70%, and will make sticky or melty some plastics, so test on a small area first. MOS is useful for wood items whose finishes would be damaged by the drying effects of alcohol.

  4. Allison44

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 15 2009 12:40:39
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    How exactly do I use the Murphy's? I have a wood captain's bed.

    This says it's for use on bedding: http://www.walgreens.com/store/product.jsp?CATID=100236&navAction=jump&navCount=1&nug=VPD&skuid=sku3372787&id=prod3373947

    Ideas?

  5. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Jul 15 2009 12:49:27
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    Here's the link to a page from the University of Florida that specifically discourages the use of permetherin on bedding:

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/IG083

    Now, I'm not a PCO, and perhaps the concentration is different, but given that the active ingredient in that spray is in the class of chemicals called pyrethroids, and given that we know at least some bed bug populations are developing resistance to that class of chemicals, I would take the advice of a page from a university over the label of a spray for a different pest myself.

    Murphy's Oil Soap is a substance used to clean wood. It's a liquid that gets mixed with water and foams up like a soap, but it's less drying than most soaps. (I first heard of it in college in the northeastern US where there were a lot of apartments with hard wood floors that couldn't be cleaned with the same things as you used to clean tile or linoleum). I just put it in a bucket and added water and then used a sponge to clean the wood. You might look at old threads here with that as a key word and see how people used it.

  6. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Jul 16 2009 0:37:04
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    De-spammed. Sorry Buggy!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

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