Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

Cheap and Effective Solutions to Bed Bugs - Share your ideas!

(17 posts)
  1. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 15:55:47
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Given all the people being plagued by bed bugs and the skyrocketing costs that come with dealing with an infestation what are some cheap and effective techniques that you've used to deal with bed bugs? I'll share a couple of techniques that were effective for me and for someone else.

    Suggestion #1:
    (This won't permanently get rid of beg bugs from your home but it will help reduce the number of bites you get at night and make bedtime less stressful). Wearing proper bed bug-deterrent clothing will reduce the number of bites you get significantly. Your tools:

    1 turtleneck shirt
    1 pair of long pants
    1 pair of socks
    1 pair of thin fabric gloves (or pantyhose)
    1 ski mask that covers your head and neck

    Tuck your shirt into your pants and pull your socks over your pants. Pull up the turtleneck so it's close to your chin and make sure it clings closely to your neck. Then put the ski mask over your head and be sure it goes either over or under your turtleneck. Wear thin fabric gloves (even pantyhose will do) to cover your hands. Be sure everything that you're wearing is made with a fine weave so bed bugs don't get through the material. Your goal is to cover up as much of your body as possible so that these insects don't bite you at night. I haven't gotten any bites on my face so far, so unfortunately don't have a solution to exposed facial skin.

    This method is uncomfortable but it beats shelling out hundreds of dollars to cope with an infestation! If you can't afford an exterminator or your landlord is slow in sending one then it might be worth doing this. Bed bugs can only live for a year and a half without a blood meal.

    Suggestion #2:
    I haven't tried this out yet personally, but it did work for someone else. If you sleep on a bed frame that has 4 legs (not like a platform bed) then this might work for you. Buy some double sided carpet tape and tape it around the legs of your bed frame. Get four plastic containers and fill with isopropyl alcohol (you can buy at any drug store). Put each leg in a bowl of alcohol. Keep the headboard of the bed frame at least 2 inches from the wall. Don't let your bedding touch the floor. If your infestation isn't severe this may be an effective remedy.

    Don't Forget: bed bugs need to get a blood meal from your body before they can (1) reproduce and (2) shed their exoskeletons (immature bed bugs). By depriving them of a blood meal you will prevent the infestation from getting larger and prevent juvenile bugs from growing into adult bugs that will reproduce.

  2. Louise

    senior member
    Joined: Jun '09
    Posts: 514

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 16:39:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    But if they don't bite you at night, they'll just find you during the day.

    Are you suggesting that this should be both daytime and nighttime attire?

    Louise

  3. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 16:44:19
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hm... from personal experience it's enough just to cover your feet, legs and torso at all times. Bed bugs don't like feeding on victims that are actively moving around. It's uncomfortable to dress like this but not forever--if you don't get a bite for 18 months you can be sure they're all dead.

  4. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 997

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 16:54:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Unfortunatley this is a formula for spreading an infestation in a multi unit housing scenario.

  5. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 17:00:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well, if everyone starts using this method then the bugs won't have anyone left to bite.

    Besides, even if you're getting bitten by bed bugs it doesn't mean they won't spread to other apartments in a large building. Whether you're an available food source or not they will spread regardless.

  6. Louise

    senior member
    Joined: Jun '09
    Posts: 514

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 17:30:41
    #



    Login to Send PM

    4blossoms - 42 minutes ago  » 
    Hm... from personal experience it's enough just to cover your feet, legs and torso at all times. Bed bugs don't like feeding on victims that are actively moving around. It's uncomfortable to dress like this but not forever--if you don't get a bite for 18 months you can be sure they're all dead.

    Hmmm. Feet, legs, and torso. So in your experience, bedbugs avoided your arms and your face?

    While I agree that bedbugs prefer to feed on victims that are not moving, if it's a choice between feeding on a moving victim or starving to death, the bedbug is going to opt for survival.

    Louise

  7. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 15,763

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 17:49:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Louise - 17 minutes ago  » 

    Hmmm. Feet, legs, and torso. So in your experience, bedbugs avoided your arms and your face?
    While I agree that bedbugs prefer to feed on victims that are not moving, if it's a choice between feeding on a moving victim or starving to death, the bedbug is going to opt for survival.

    4blossoms,

    My experience of covering one part of my body was that they'd bite any other part they could.

    People who "isolate" their beds to avoid being bitten at night report being bitten during the daytime as they sit in chairs -- or even, in extreme cases, while standing in their homes.

    The clothing you wear is not going to keep bed bugs from biting, and as Winston points out, they may continue to spread.

    This is not an effective alternative to treatment.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  8. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 18:32:14
    #



    Login to Send PM

    NO NO we must wait for the all knowing Bait to weigh in with her omnipotent knowledge.

    All of us pleebs who now live bug free or professionals do not know jack squat in light of her awesomeness.

  9. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Feb 27 2010 23:45:20
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hm I guess my infestation must be pretty mild. The clothing trick has been working for me so far and I don't even have a bed frame, the mattress is on the floor. I wouldn't say this is an alternative solution to a PCO, but if you're low on cash and your landlord isn't sending in an exterminator fast enough then it could be a low-tech solution in the interim.

    I was getting bites during the day regardless of being bitten at night. I do think that if you cover up your body it's still better than leaving skin exposed.

    Will keep you posted if I get any more bites...

  10. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Mar 8 2010 22:19:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well, it's been over a week and this method has helped a bit. I can't entirely avoid bites but there are a lot fewer bites than there used to be--definitely no more on the neck. Bed bugs can't seem to bite through clothing with a fine or tight weave very easily. My deadbeat landlords said they'd take care of this 2 weeks ago but they still haven't sent a PCO to my apartment.

    Although I'm not getting the "breakfast-lunch-dinner" pattern with the big red welts anymore I'm still getting tiny pimple-sized bumps that disappear after a couple of hours. I'm guessing it's the nymphs that are biting me because when I scratch the itchy places sometimes I end up with some little white bit of god-knows-what between my fingers that feels like skin dander but I'm guessing may also be a bed bug nymph. As long nothing brown-colored is biting me I know these little suckers aren't reproducing from my blood and that at least is a relief.

  11. buggyinsocal

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 2,431

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Mar 9 2010 12:10:36
    #



    Login to Send PM

    There is substantial evidence that nymph bites result in bites the same size as adult bites, not smaller ones.

    I know that it doesn't make much logical sense that that would be the case. Logically it would seem that a smaller bug would equal a smaller bite, but there's good video of a person undergoing a bite test (in controlled conditions, an adult bed bug and a nymph are placed on the person's arm and allowed to feed so that it can be easily observed if the person reacts to bites, since we know some people don't react). In that footage, the response to the nymph and adult bites are red, itchy-looking welts of the same size.

    Sometimes what seems logical turns out not to be the case.

    While I'm glad you're finding some relief from this method, I feel like I should point out to any future readers of the thread that we've had several reports from people who tried this in the past that the bugs simply began biting whatever exposed skin was available--including the person's face, resulting in large, unsightly bug bites on a part of the body that everyone can see which made many of the sufferers much more miserable than bites on legs or arms had.

  12. soscared

    senior member
    Joined: Sep '09
    Posts: 427

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Mar 9 2010 13:11:05
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Also - I believe it is false that if you see no brown bugs but only nymphs, that means they are NOT reproducing from eating your blood. Just the opposite would seem to be true. If you see nymphs, that means something is reproducing and laying eggs, which are then hatching. Seeing a couple of adults might mean that you didn't get them all yet. I'd be much more troubled, personally, to be seeing nymphs.

  13. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 10 2010 16:01:22
    #



    Login to Send PM

    buggyinsocal - 1 day ago  » 
    ....While I'm glad you're finding some relief from this method, I feel like I should point out to any future readers of the thread that we've had several reports from people who tried this in the past that the bugs simply began biting whatever exposed skin was available--including the person's face, resulting in large, unsightly bug bites on a part of the body that everyone can see which made many of the sufferers much more miserable than bites on legs or arms had.

    Yes, I was experiencing this very thing. Last week the bed bugs were biting my face because I had to leave my nose and mouth exposed for breathing. I found a good solution to this. I have long hair and brush it over my face at night, then wear a cloth cap to hold the hair down. The hair covers my entire face but I am still able to breathe. I didn't get a single bite for the last couple of nights since trying this. According to an MSNBC article, unlike fleas and lice, bed bugs aren't physically adapted to navigating through human hair. They need to position themselves in a certain way in order to feed and hair makes it difficult for them to do this. So they much prefer bare skin. If you cover your face with hair they have a harder time latching on to your skin to feed. The only difficulty is trying to keep the hair there all night but a few hair bands can do wonders.

  14. 4blossoms

    junior member
    Joined: Feb '10
    Posts: 40

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Mar 10 2010 16:19:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Oh jeez I hope this isn't true because it would mean these bugs are coming from the neighbors next door. ..

    soscared - 1 day ago  » 
    Also - I believe it is false that if you see no brown bugs but only nymphs, that means they are NOT reproducing from eating your blood. Just the opposite would seem to be true. If you see nymphs, that means something is reproducing and laying eggs, which are then hatching. Seeing a couple of adults might mean that you didn't get them all yet. I'd be much more troubled, personally, to be seeing nymphs.

  15. muffinsrequired

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '10
    Posts: 5

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Apr 9 2010 21:30:03
    #



    Login to Send PM

    OMG i actually do this!!! but it gets kind of hot to do that .. i just wear a long sleeve tucked into long pants and socks

  16. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 15,763

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Apr 10 2010 15:46:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    4blossoms - 1 month ago  » 
    Last week the bed bugs were biting my face because I had to leave my nose and mouth exposed for breathing. I found a good solution to this. I have long hair and brush it over my face at night, then wear a cloth cap to hold the hair down. The hair covers my entire face but I am still able to breathe. I didn't get a single bite for the last couple of nights since trying this. According to an MSNBC article, unlike fleas and lice, bed bugs aren't physically adapted to navigating through human hair. They need to position themselves in a certain way in order to feed and hair makes it difficult for them to do this. So they much prefer bare skin. If you cover your face with hair they have a harder time latching on to your skin to feed. The only difficulty is trying to keep the hair there all night but a few hair bands can do wonders.

    I think that bed bugs would have more difficulty walking through the hair on your head, rather than crawling up your face which hair is hanging down upon (which is what I gather from your description).

    Bed bugs prefer to bite skin and unexposed skin, but plenty of people have bites under clothing, because bed bugs can crawl under it.

    I don't doubt they can crawl on a face with hair hanging onto it for the same reason.

    Like buggyinsocal, I am glad you're feeling some relief, but I don't think these strategies are likely to make much difference. They won't keep bed bugs from biting you long-term. Even if you manage to convince bed bugs not to bite you in bed (which I seriously doubt will be the outcome), they can bite you in the daytime as you sit or even stand in your home.

  17. BronxBitten

    junior member
    Joined: Apr '10
    Posts: 41

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Apr 24 2010 0:15:37
    #



    Login to Send PM

    i wonder, actually, how we can not feel doom by reading all this. how the hell is one to keep sane knowing how relentless this creature is? truly.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

184,369 posts in 28,325 topics over 87 months by 12,196 of 19,350 members. Latest: MANthrax, buggingcane, pecunianon
Site Meter