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HOW WHEN and WHY do bed bugs hibernate???

(17 posts)
  1. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 16:51:59
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    I'd really like to know? Wouldn't you any theories or guesses, or can you direct me/us to a pertinent link???

  2. Jessinchicago

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 18:59:35
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    Hopefully an expert will respond. This is such a great question.

    Based on previous conversations with experts, I was under the impression that bedbugs would become dormant if no food source was available OR if they sensed danger from improperly applied pesticides. I remember one comment from a PCO regarding the use of Drione (I think) in which he emphasized that if Drione was applied improperly (ie in clumps instead of in a thin layer) then the bedbugs might sense it and become dormant so as to avoid death by chemical. I especially remember that this comment made me really fearful of using any kind of chemical (or natural) pesticide without the guidance of the PCO working on the case, because it was hinted that a person could make a bedbug infestation much worse by using pesticides improperly.

  3. S

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 19:36:51
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    I agree, this question merits a lot more information than is available. I'd really REALLY like to understand this better.

    I sent a down comforter to the drycleaners, and when it came back, I put it in a closet for 6 months. I didn't open that closet very often, but I did spend significant amounts of time sitting at the desk right next to the closet. I don't believe the bug(s) in that comforter ever came out to find me.

    Of course, I eventually took out and used the comforter, and was bit right away. So I believe the bedbug(s) in that comforter went dormant.

    It may have been the drycleaning. I don't really know what drycleaners do, exactly, but I believe it involves both quick heat and chemicals. So perhaps it was the drycleaning process that caused them to go dormant.

    Or perhaps it was the fact that the comforter was sitting in a closet, in our office, opposite the house from the bedroom. We were rarely near it. Maybe they just never sensed me near the closet.

    My add to the question is, what makes them go dormant, AND what makes them "awaken" from dormancy?

    Perhaps this is a better question for the yahoo group, where some entomologists gather. I'll pose it tomorrow.

  4. nyjammin

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 20:34:36
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    S. any findings can you please post. thanks.

  5. nyjammin

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 20:35:43
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    Jess, based on that information, did you use any pesticides like de or anything like that?

  6. nyjammin

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sun May 6 2007 20:40:11
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    I forgot something. I thought that once you put de down it lasts forever. It probably evaporates over time though. So if you keep putting down de, I don't think that the bb can hibernate forever. I don't think any living thing is THAT tough. Although given what I've encountered these past few months, anything is possible.

  7. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon May 7 2007 15:11:30
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    MORE about "laying De down"

    It is nearly impossible to lay it down, because it is lighter than air (not literally) but it definitely does tend to get kicked up very (comma) very easily.
    As it is basically the fossilized hard skeletal remains of a one celled organisms called diatoms that existed billions of years ago--it does last forever!
    It's keeping it DOWN that the problem. It's vacuuming (or accidentally kicking it up) that's the problem! OK sure for the record I overused it by far--it eventually will corrode or cut the inside of a plastic vacuum hose. (I'm on my third.) And it "aunt" pretty because I went out of my way and spent the extra 60.00 for the super vac model. This was worth it because it has the TRUE HEP Filter ... so at least it does not seem to come out of the other end of the vacuum. I have had to wet and scrub a lot of it DOWN into the rug because it all too easily comes UP!
    With kids ... it is even more dangerous to use, can get into the lungs--to some degree--and if not coughed up and out can potentially damage lung tissue permanently. I have not found this to be the case entirely--but erring on the side of caution is always best with all pesticides.
    Goggles respirator and some forethought needs to be put into where you ALY IT DOWN and WHY.
    It is best uses inside walls ... in the light sockets (not in the electrical part of a wall socket--but around the perimeter of it--AND INTO THE WALL. Even if you have to somehow loosen the wall plate to get it DOWN in there.
    Bed bugs will avoid it fairly faithfully ... and if we are lucky they will eventually cross it to bite us ad hopefully eventually dry out and die. R. alcohol and most of the enzymes cleaners all tend to dry the bugs out. But it takes a lot of time and effort and persistence. I have used the De in heat traps put placed it inside old clothing so that if a bug came by and felt the gentle breezy warmth floating over a few blown up balloons (to simulate exhaled C02 and they saw a sweaty old shirt ... My hopes are that they would decide to bed DOWN for the day. the problem is that the blowing air from the heater must be pointed upward a bit so that it does not actually blow the DE all around the room. I am so lucky the ceramic tile heater I have has adjusted notches to direct the air slightly higher than the DE. Hot air rises anyway ... but you don't want to take the DE UP with the hot air.
    For me it has been trying to out guess what a bed bug might find as a comfortable habitat to bed down in during the day time. That is why I use sneakers and old clothes. I usually leave them on the cusp of an opened plastic bag so I can either whip it up and toss it out or go do a load of laundry. All my efforts here have produced 8 or 10 dead nymphs. Now that is good because I don't really think I have any viable bugs left in here. Maybe a few in the electronics....
    I'm putting in a plug for plain old Vaseline again ... it will seal up cracks and crevices if put in there heavily enough--it is cheaper, quicker than caulking--but mind you I am not against caulking in any way shape or form.
    If I owned my place ... I do the caulking in a minute. Chances are the management will cite me in their dumb inspections next month. De is best put DOWN into corners of rooms where the floor meets the wall. Perhaps a tad in the drawers and in the sealed boxes is not going to hurt.
    It is not good for kids or animals to be over there playing around it.

    String of cuss words 49584itn4eiwot 94tiop4jti4y905top4jidr5j904t9p
    Hahn! That was lovely.
    I have scrubbed the de DOWN further into the carpet by scrubbing id in with water and a stiff bristle brush. I have fanned sprayed Steamer over it--to get it to soak DOWN. I have coughed up DE and I've had some chest pains from it.
    I figure Vaseline surrounding the de's light sockets just makes it triple hard for these bugs. And it's not like THEY are my FRIENDS I am THEIR meal!
    except for bedbugs I hope every creature on Earth has a nice day!

  8. nyjammin

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon May 7 2007 19:14:27
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    wtw: did you ever try to put vaseline all around your place where the wall meets the floor? There might be reasons not to do this, i dunno. Too messy, dirt can accumulate in it and cause roaches, just guessing. If the bbs jump from the wall onto the floor, i don't think that they could jump back into the hiding place if there were blobs of vaseline all around. And....
    Do I put blobs of vaseline on my bedlegs or is a thin layer enough.
    thanks.

  9. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon May 7 2007 22:53:20
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    I suppose roaches might try to eat vasaline donno.
    I was packing it into the crack around things but not like putting it on my rug. Ceiling things ... wall things ... signs that say pull chain in case of emergency, sprinklers...landlords ... whatever hole that needed colgging

  10. u2dan

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 13:46:14
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    Ew i would rather have roaches than bedbugs! Also, what is this constant talk about jumping? I thought they do not jump nor do they fly. If they do jump, then i have been misinformed, if they do not jump i think it would be safest to stop saying thta they jump (unless of course the do), because i have never seen a skipping bedbug and it would scare the crap out of me if i did!! ha.

    I just say this becuase people will now be terrified thining theyre actually going to leap from the wall onto your head...drop from the ceiling, maybe, but jump perhaps not.

  11. S

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 16:43:30
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    You guys, bedbugs don't jump.

    End of story.

    Now Jammin states "if the bedbugs jump from the wall to the floor." Perhaps Jammin means "fall" - they can fall off things (and apparently do, all the time - they are said to not be particularly good climbers).

    But jump - no. Good catch, u2dan.

  12. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 16:58:48
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    hibernation .... what about that! Do they or not!

  13. nyjammin

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 20:20:16
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    wtw: sorry to have gotten off topic, thanks for the info. about vaseline.

  14. u2dan

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 20:26:32
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    OK good to know for sure they dont jump. I see this in many threads on how they "jump" but it had me thinking. Sorry to get off topic too.

  15. Bugalina

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue May 8 2007 22:06:52
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    I have heard that bed bugs do not jump...but they do "bungee" off of ceilings onto beds...they pinpoint the location of exhaled co2 and "fall"onto the bed...there was a person on the blog who said she saw one fall from her ceiling....In the old days they were referred to as "wall lice"....This is only what I have heard and read.....but I would not put my bed underneath a low ceiling fixture...and I think its a good idea to take double sided carpet tape * Frost King brand is good, and tape around where the walls meet the ceiling...this way, if there is any truth to their being capable of falliing from ceilings...they might first get stuck onto the tape that lines the path....

  16. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Wed May 9 2007 13:16:33
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    You know... it's ok if it's a bit off topic at least we all know they don't jump and they do--according to the little poop trailed left on my ceiling try to cross even from theother side of a room. (I originally had them trapped behind furniture and a lot of DE ... Up they climbed and over they started coming ....
    It is a good thing I noticed....
    I wonder too ... why did they ever invent crown molding ... mine has a shallow runner in it ... and I'm half tempted to go out and buy a few gallons of Vaseline and fill in the gaps. I'm only half joking here. these crown moldings seem to invite bed bug disaster but I bet if one thinks long and hard enough they can figure out a way to turn the tables and use the crown molding as some sort of entrapment Vaseline ... double stick tape--this would have to go in a strip above and a strip below--a LOT OF WORK!
    And truthfully ...If the bed bugs DO come back ... then I'll worry about that.
    I’m so lucky to be on the top floor but that is still no guarantee they could not get into the vents and the ceiling fixtures--they almost did once ... but I caught it in time.
    OK--Hibernation when why and how do they slip into it and also, come out of it--what are the conditions: that's the question at hand: Both S and I have posted yahoo questions, (at least I think I did last week, but; S., has a better question up and I have not heard back on my question yet.)

  17. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu May 17 2007 0:55:00
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    Why and under what conditions do bed bugs go into and come out of dormancy?

    Hey S., I have some trouble getting into yahoo groups. I saw a few "half hinted answers" to the question you put there and mine from a week or so prior seemed to disapear.
    We should stay on top of this huh?


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