Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Reader questions (do not fit into other categories)

How do bedbugs hitchhike?

(19 posts)
  1. bettwanze

    newbite
    Joined: Apr '08
    Posts: 6

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Apr 9 2008 14:23:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    How really these critters hitchhike? I mean, when everyone in the forum says "probably you brought in some bugs from your friends house" you mean...

    a) that one adult crawled somehow into his clothes or belongings?

    OR

    b) that his clothes had some eventual contact with eggs?

    I'm just wondering on what should I be aware when I'm out of home..

    Thanks for the support!!!

  2. MixedFeelings

    member
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 180

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Apr 9 2008 15:35:28
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Much more likely that a bug crawled onto/into clothes, purse, bag, etc. But note that the bug could be any life stage - a baby nymph, adolescent (several sizes) or adult. It is much less likely that an adult bug would lay eggs on someone (although possible).

    MF

  3. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,064

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Apr 9 2008 16:03:44
    #



    Login to Send PM

    They stick out an upper claw show a little femur and away they go. Bed bugs do not fly like mosquitoes nor do they jump like fleas. They hang out behind and under and if you or a belonging spend enough time they may inadvertently get in your bag, coat etc. We advise
    persons who do home visits to sit at a dining room table and place their bags there as well. In other cases bed bugs may hitchhike or as we say enter an area as "captives" say
    on a piece of furniture or on or in the suitcase or knapsack of a visitor.

  4. Bites44

    junior member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 99

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Apr 9 2008 20:10:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    "They stick out an upper claw show a little femur and away they go. "
    Hahaha, love it.

    I believe that you can bring them home on your clothes, transferred from someone elses clothes or shoes. Stay away from used furniture at all costs. You can bring them home in a book (I did!!) In these bug times, I do not buy anything in second hand stores or flea markets.

    I visit a home that still has bugs. I put my purse in the fridge, my shoes and coat in a plastic bag. I bring a change of clothes in a plastic bag and change clothes just before I leave. As you see I buy a lot of plastic bags, don't we all. I've had the blighters and don't want them again.

    As well, even if I didn't have bugs I would buy some Food Grade DE and coat the baseboards, under the sofa, the metal bed frame and box spring, etc., as a preventative. Actually I took up all the original DE in my house and then dusted lightly again.

  5. angie

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 396

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Apr 10 2008 12:47:16
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Winston, I want to let you know that I have seen a bedbug jump. This was the only time and even the PCO was stumped. I think its fair to never say never when it comes to bedbugs. Just wanted to add my 2 cents worth!

  6. bed-bugscouk

    oldtimer
    Joined: Apr '07
    Posts: 11,755

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Apr 10 2008 13:16:50
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Hi,

    Simple fact is that they hitch hike on items or people that come into the home. If you come into contact with an infected area when there is always a risk that one will be on you or an item and thats how they get carried back into home.

    It can be on clothes, shoes, trousers, coats, jumpers anything that comes into contact with infected areas. It is usually the adults and nymphs rather than eggs that enter a property but both are feasible.

    I have also seen them enter via books, magazine, furniture although there is usually evidence on the infected items if people could be bothered to have a look for it.

    I am not a big fan of the concept of preventative treating regardless of the methodology or products used and prefer to promote personal inspection as part of your monthly home clean and mattress rotation program.

    I will however say that I have never seen a Bed Bug jump, I take the point on board about never saying never but after some 7,000 infestations I think I have seen most of the unusual bed bug activity. Maybe it had got board of blood and moved into feeding from the Mexican beans.

    The simple fact is that there are multiple ways of getting bed bugs into your property its just not as simple as finding a single cause to blame.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  7. angie

    member
    Joined: Nov '07
    Posts: 396

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Apr 10 2008 13:26:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Actually the PCO that was treating my place, said that they had used a nerve agent and that maybe that was why he jumped. He jumped from the wall to the futon I was laying on. I was watching him to see if he would take me to his leader as we couldn't find where these suckers were coming from. He jumped about 3 inches from wall to futon and I freaked out so bad that I never seen where he went. About two weeks later, we found the nests and bugs of the bottom of the futon and out it went. Guess that was where his leader was! Or at least the leaders sister!

  8. Bugless

    member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 143

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Apr 10 2008 16:45:15
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Bedbugs could be spread through rental video discs. Usually, each disc is provided in a paper sleeve (a square envelope with no flap). The title and a brief summary of the video are printed on the sleeve.

    Bedbugs like to lurk in paper or cardboard. If a home with bedbugs has a rental disc for a while, one or more of the bugs could crawl into the sleeve. The next renter of the disc might then be afflicted with the bugs.

    I rent videos from a firm which sends them by mail. Their service is excellent, and their website is marvelous in the facilities it provides for selecting videos.

    But I've started to worry about bedbugs in the paper sleeves. What I've started doing when I receive a video disc in the mail is this:

    1. Place a white sheet of paper on my desk close to the desk lamp, where there is plenty of light. All the following steps are carried out over the sheet of paper. If anything drops onto the paper, I have a plastic block ready to squash it.

    2. Open the mailing envelope and take out the sleeve.

    3. Remove the disc from the sleeve.

    4. Place the sleeve in a ziploc bag.

    5. Put the mailing envelope, which is also a return-mailing envelope, in the ziploc bag. (I fold the mailing envelope in half so it will fit.)

    6 . Holding the disc vertical, I drop it about an inch onto the white sheet of paper, but don't let it fall on its side. If anything drops off, I squash it. I don't wait to see if it moves. I drop the disc with one hand and have the block ready to use in the other hand.

    7. I examine both sides of the disc for bugs or spots that could be nymphs that did not drop off. If I see anything suspicious, I have a file card ready to scrape it off onto the white sheet of paper.

    8. I seal the ziploc bag.

    9. Next day, I open the ziploc bag, put the disc in the sleeve, and place them in the return envelope and seal it.

    10. Put the return envelope in my mail box with the mail flag up so the mailman will pick it up.

    To kill any bedbugs I might have missed, I tried giving a heat treatment to the ziploc bag. I placed it on top of the wall-type gas heater in my living room. But the heat was too great and the ziploc bag got sort of shriveled up and melted a bit. I'm trying to think of some other way to heat treat it while I'm watching the video.

    I would never heat treat the video disc itself. It doesn't belong to me.

    For those unfortunate people who have bedbugs in their home, I suggest they keep their spare writing envelopes in a ziploc.

    I am looking for something like a paint roller, only smaller and with a hard roll. They used to be used in printing and also in photo developing, but they don't seem to make them any more. I want to use it in place of the plastic block, which could miss. A roller about 5 inches wide would not miss. Anybody know where I can get something like that?

  9. laureneliz

    newbite
    Joined: Mar '08
    Posts: 21

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Apr 18 2008 17:24:10
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I totally had one of those rollers (used it to ink up wood blocks in an art class) until I purged my belongings pre-PCO visit.

  10. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,064

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 10:32:35
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Have you ever found a bed bug on a disk or accompanying package?

  11. LindseyNicole

    newbite
    Joined: Apr '08
    Posts: 13

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Apr 19 2008 23:18:54
    #



    Login to Send PM

    As far as the roller goes, I have something similar that I use for pie shells. However, wouldn't a small rolling pin work just as well? I'd look into that... pretty cheap at almost any grocery or cooking supply store.

  12. fightorflight

    senior member
    Joined: Jan '08
    Posts: 705

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Apr 20 2008 4:11:02
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Arggghhh.... Bugless!!!! I was getting all worked up about restarting my Netflix subscription and then just decided I was being paranoid and not to worry about it. But now you've got me agitated all over again. I *really, really* don't want to go through that big production every time I get a DVD. But then, I *really, really* don't want bedbugs again either. Maybe I can come up with something easier. Most of those damned discs are mucked and scratched anyway, so maybe if I washed every one before viewing and kept the packaging in Ziplocs that would be effective enough... nuts. My uninitiated friends don't worry about getting free bedbugs with their DVD rentals, why do I have to?

    Aaaghhhh... last... remaining pieces...- ... of my sanity... -..- .... *disintegrating*.....

  13. Cody

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 15

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Jun 7 2008 8:46:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    HAHAHA I signed up for the Australian equivalent of Netflix a few weeks ago, and when I got 2 discs in the mail today I checked both envelopes carefully thinking that maybe something had crawled in when my housemate had left them on the kitchen table.

    I didn't find anything. But then I started wondering if maybe some of MY bed bugs had crawled into the previously sent return envelopes! I did have them sitting on my bed after all, before I even knew I had a problem.

    That would SUCK if people got them through envelopes like this. Holy moly. What's worse is - how can those rental companies protect themselves against something like this?

    And imagine normal video rental stores ... a bed bug could probably crawl in between the plastic and paper cover ...

  14. Bugless

    member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 143

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Jun 7 2008 11:43:25
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I have never actually found bedbugs or their eggs on rental video discs or the accompanying packaging material.

    Bedbugs probably could not cling to a disc, but their sticky eggs could.

    The greatest possibility is in the paper sleeve, the mailing envelope, and the return envelope. For some reason, bedbugs seem to like paper and cardboard.

    I have read that NetFlix is starting to use a new type of sheet plastic for the sleeves. Perhaps it won't be as cozy as paper is to bedbugs. Maybe it could be sprayed with an insect repellent as well.

    Also, NetFlix could treat all incoming and outgoing envelopes with X-rays or something else that will kill whatever might be in the envelopes. Heat would do it, up to a point that does not damage the discs. NetFlix has such an excellent organization going that I do not think they will ignore this problem.

    But if science does not come up with a more general method to easily kill bedbugs, all mail will become suspect. Far worse than that, many kinds of business and human activity will be seriously affected, from cruise liners on down. It's staggering to think of.

    Or can people learn to become nonchalant about bedbugs, the way they are about mosquito bites?

    After all, everyone has millions of bacteria on their skin. A great many people also have eyebrow mites or eyelash mites. But these cannot be seen. There is something horrifying about actually seeing a creature that can feed on you.

    A mosquito bites you once then it is gone, and window screens will keep them out of the house. However, bedbugs live inside a house and come back to a person again and again to feed. Can people be taught to tolerate them, the way some of the people in poor countries do?

    There is already reading material and stuffed toys that teach kids to have a light-hearted attitude toward creepy-crawlies.

  15. Bugless

    member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 143

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Jun 7 2008 13:20:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I did a big write-up on checking rental video discs for bedbugs. But I tend to be over-wordy.

    Flightorflight says, "I really, really don't want to go through that big production every time I get a DVD."

    But it's simple. Just look for bedbugs or eggs when you open the envelopes. Have two ziplocs and a squashblock handy. One ziploc is for sleeves and return envelopes. The other ziploc is for packaging material that will be discarded. Squash anything that drops out. Don't even wait to see if it moves.

    Contact-kill or freeze spray could be used instead of a squashblock.

    I now check incoming video discs outdoors on my back-yard work bench (an old kitchen table). The only thing I bring indoors are the discs themselves. I leave the ziplocs outside.

    Also, all junk mail stays outside the house, waiting in a plastic bag for trash pickup. I seal the plastic bag with a rubber band.

    Any package I receive in the mail is also opened outdoors. The packaging material stays out there in a plastic bag, awaiting trash pickup.

    I carry all mail from the mail box directly to the to back yard, outside the house.

    I open first-class mail at my desk, with the squashblock handy.

  16. Cody

    newbite
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 15

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Jun 7 2008 13:23:49
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I was thinking if eggs are so sticky maybe some scientist can investigate the chemical composition of the glue and artificially create a new kind of crazy-glue from it. Or, create massive bed bug farms, where they are harvested for their glue - Matrix style. Oh how sweet that would be.

    Honey comes from a bees behind.
    Milk comes from a cows behind.
    Glue comes from a bed bugs behind...

  17. Bugless

    member
    Joined: Dec '07
    Posts: 143

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Jun 8 2008 23:02:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I mentioned that bedbugs could be in the paper sleeve that contains a rental video disc. I've never heard of this happening, but it seems possible.

    However, do not put video discs in a microwave oven. I tried that a while ago with an old video disc of my own, and the disc was destroyed. I watched through the glass door of the oven, and the disc started to smoke in about 5 seconds. I took it out of the oven, and the recording side was covered with a mosaic of many small cracks.

  18. terrifiedtosleep

    junior member
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 86

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue Jun 10 2008 23:31:13
    #



    Login to Send PM

    so it's possible that just a single bug finds it's way on you and presto!

    I just moved and I've only had bed bugs for ONE WEEK and there's MANY of them. Mostly all in different stages of nymphs and one adult caught so far.

    Is it possible I could have carried multiple bugs in with me?

    Is it safe to say they were already here in the apartment?

  19. Nobugsonme

    your host
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 16,938

    offline

    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed Jun 11 2008 0:31:12
    #



    Login to Send PM

    terrified,

    I have to say that MANY bed bugs appearing in a new apartment all at once seems to suggest they may have been there when you moved in.

    People have gotten them from moving trucks, but my money would be on the apartment if you noticed a lot at once.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."

RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.