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How long can they survive without blood?

(11 posts)
  1. sandeepn81

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Feb 8 2010 8:21:07
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    Hi all,

    I just took out some old clothes, which were packed inside a zipped up checkin-baggage from about an year. These were the cloths I was using while in UK, currently I'm in India.

    Coincidentally, since the time I've took out these cloths, I'm suspecting bed bug activity in my room. I feel like being bitten at nights. Also, I'm skeptical about my shoes and socks. I feel like being bitten once I reach office and settle down and start working.

    Is it possible that the bed bugs (if they are indeed beg bugs) would have come through the cloths that I recently took out? Is it possible that BBs, or their eggs, could've survived for about an year in the clothing, without any food?

    How long can bed-bugs/eggs survive without feeding?

  2. eyehatebug

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Feb 9 2010 1:23:40
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    Check int he FAQs, but I think they can live 18 mos without feeding.

  3. bedbugresearcher

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 16:46:53
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    Most literature states that an adult bed bug can live 12 to 18 months without blood.

  4. bait

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 16:58:42
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    Hi bbresearcher,

    Hope things are getting interesting at the job. Please tell.

    I'm your typical know-it-all, so let me add that the 12-18 mos. (18 is disputable) is under ideal conditions, preferably a lab, in isolation, after one feeding, and in a constant temperature control of I think 50 degrees fahrenheit.

    Somebody please tweak the facts.

    Bait

  5. spideyjg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 17:04:24
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    Where it comes from...

    “The effect of starvation on survival is so intimately connected with
    temperature and humidity that it is difficult to assess the effect of starvation alone. At 22C and 40 to 45% RH, Kemper (1930) found mean survival times for C. lectularius without food to be 83.7 days in first and second instars, 130.6 days in adult females, and 142.6 days in males.
    In a practical test of survival, Bacot (1914) fed bugs of various stages once and then kept them lasting in an outhouse for 18 months. Several fed at the end of this period. Johnson (1942) concludes that "if a house has remained unoccupied for a long time, fifth instars, unmated adult females or mated adult males would be most likely to predominate in the surviving population."
    Kemper (1936) called attention to the "hunger bubbles" that, during fasting, may fill the entire midgut.”

    Usingers Monograph page 16

    “The longevity of fasting adults of C. lectularius and C. hemipterus
    (after having once fed) is greatest at low temperatures and least at high temperatures (Omori 1941, Table 2-2). This is an important point in survival of the species over the winter in unheated rooms in northern Europe.

    Life Starvation
    Stage Survival at Temp
    50F.....65F... 81F...99F
    1 274.6 113.6 27.8 16.8
    2 398.9 171.1 45.6 30.4
    3 412.7 214.4 71.2 35.3
    4 432.5 234.1 73.3 37.2
    5 484.9 161.4 39.5 32.6
    AF 425.0 277.1 86.7 31.9
    AM 401.9 175.6 43.4 28.6

    AF=Adult Female
    AM= Adult Male”

    Usinger's Mongraph page 12 and table 2-2

    The table gets beat to snot trying to copy and paste it in here.

    In Bacot's test they survived 18 months.

    Jim

  6. bait

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 17:17:38
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    spideyjg - 6 minutes ago  » 
    In a practical test of survival, Bacot (1914) fed bugs of various stages once and then kept them lasting in an outhouse for 18 months. Several fed at the end of this period. Johnson (1942) concludes that "if a house has remained unoccupied for a long time, fifth instars, unmated adult females or mated adult males would be most likely to predominate in the surviving population."
    Jim

    Spidey, a point was made recently that because an outhouse is not a sealed environment, the bugs may have had the opportunity to feed off mice or birds.

    It's good that it's a field study, but now we need new field studies conducted by today's standards.

    Bait

  7. spideyjg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 19:59:18
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    So every scientific study ever done on BBs needs to be redone?

    Why do I even bother.

    Jim

  8. BugsInTO

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 21:03:06
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    Hi - I have stuff in isolation since Aug, 2008, so I am counting the last months. (It's stuff I couldn't easily decontaminate.)

    I apologize for the length of this post:

    When I started out, I planned for the 18 months isolation based on the same info derived from the 1914 study and repeated in this forum. (The first PCO I spoke to told me bedbugs could live five years. Did not hire him.)

    Lately, there was that study done (I can't find the reference) that was on a particular group of pyrethrin resistant bedbugs and they did not live nearly as long as the ones in 1914.

    For the original poster - (1) Yes,I think it's possible bedbugs could live a year. (2) It sounds like you have had the suitcase in India, unpacked for a year? Otherwise, if it was in transit (such as you brought it on the plane with you six weeks ago) though it hadn't been opened for 10.5 months before that, it could have been contaminated in transit. (3) People report that bedbugs don't give a bite sensation. ie. A bed bug's saliva features an anesthetic to numb the pain as it's biting. Though highly reactive people will feel the burning & itching right away. If you are feeling like you are being bitten, maybe it is something else, not a bedbug, that is biting you.

    I have read it many time here, so I will repeat to you though I have no personal experience, to really check to see what it could be. It could be mites, which are very tiny, so get a magnifying glass and a good light and read the FAQ's on searching and see what you can find. Good luck.

    As for repeating all bedbug experiments, I wish we could. The essence of a scientific experiment is repeatable results. So, you have to repeat them, don't you? just to be certain. And, times have changed. I don't think that bedbugs could possibly be genetically unchanged after nearly a 100 years of exposure to all kinds of pesticides.

    I was so happy when I read that maybe (1) It wasn't 70% of people who were non-reactive after all, because being reactive is an important detection method (though I still want to win the contest and get the monitors.) (2) Equally happy when I heard that maybe bedbugs could only live a couple of months. Keeping my fingers crossed that more studies will find this to be true.

    The length of time that they lived in 1914....maybe bedbugs can only live that long under those specific experimental conditions. In real life, you can't tell one bedbug from another and it is so impossible to control the situation, you don't know if that bedbug you've just found is back from dormancy having hidden for 14 months under a baseboard, or if it's just arrived from the neighbours.

  9. spideyjg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 22:47:51
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    Last word.

    Published data from old studies is a result of scientific experimentation and certainly was debated and questioned before publication.

    As for repeating all bedbug experiments, I wish we could. The essence of a scientific experiment is repeatable results. So, you have to repeat them, don't you? just to be certain. And, times have changed. I don't think that bedbugs could possibly be genetically unchanged after nearly a 100 years of exposure to all kinds of pesticides.

    I wouldn't want to see BB research which isn't chock full of funding anyhow, wasting cake on reconfirming established facts unless there was compelling evidence to challenge it.

    No more facts from me then.

    Jim

  10. bait

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Feb 10 2010 23:54:58
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    Sandeep,

    You didn't tell us if you had bed bugs a year ago in England.

    Spidey reminded us that at 22 degrees celsius (71F) and 45% relative humidity, approx. 4.5 months was the mean survival. Based on that, if your clothes were stored for about a year in moderate temps (like a closet) in England's climate (mixed bag), the clothes wouldn't hold up as the source of your bites. If where the clothes were was wet and cool for a good part of the year, that could lengthen the 4.5 months considerably, and if your 'about a year' was really 8 months, you're getting into the realm of possibility.

    Bait

  11. BugsInTO

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Feb 11 2010 20:29:58
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    This thread's off track and Spideyjg's said "last word" so, after this, me too. I've lived by these statistics and been glad to have them. "If wishes were horses, beggars would ride." I didn't mean "should", just "wish". BugsInTO


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