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How fast do bed bugs multiply so that you can see more evidence of them?

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  1. nancytd

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Sep 3 2010 19:56:31
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    From my first post here I haven't seen an increase in signs. I just continue to get some bites at night (not many) but I can't find where they live. Does it take a week or a month? Am I just getting lucky or are they multiplying somewhere I can't see? The way I initially diagnosed them was I put a vinyl cover on my box spring because I had 3 bites in a row that were unlike bites I had before. At first the vinyl cover was clean for a few days I think. Then I checked the underside of the box spring and there was smeared blood in a few spots on the inside. It must have been their digested food. The cover ripped and there was that bed bug smell emanating from it. I freaked out and threw it out, taped the wood floor under my bed to seal it. (I hope I didn't damage the wood floor. That didn't even cross my mind at the time due to my stress over the bed bugs.) Put double sided tape around the edges of that. I haven't seen any more signs. Is it possible they're not going to get out of hand?? Maybe the bedbug(s) I have is a male(s) only?

  2. bugnut

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Sep 4 2010 6:53:32
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    Nancytc,

    Unless you methodically check every nook and cranny in your BR, you may not find them. It is possible to do, but you must have a clear head and lots of time. BBs will stay within 10 feet of the source (usually) so you would need to fan out in that direction. However, my advise is to have a PCO come over and inspect and treat. Have him spray the boxspring with Bedlam and then seal it up with a good (NOT vinyl) encasement along with a mattress encasement also. Also treat the areas around your bed. They will probably treat the whol room , it not the whole apt (?). If you only have a few bites you can catch it early. You will also need to treat your clothing and other soft items too (towels, sheets etc). Sheets and bedding in hot water and dry BONE dry on hottest setting. Other clothing in the dryer up for at least a 1/2 hour on hottest setting (over 120).

    Read some of the success stories here - they will often say "this is what I did" and it can help tremendously. Warning - this whole episode will be physically and mentally exhausting and expensive so be ready for it, but the vast majority of folks DO get rid of them.

    Good Luck!

  3. nancytd

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Sep 4 2010 17:36:24
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    I have chemical sensitivities. Also, the other person in the house has no interest in spraying either because of the chemical exposure. Also, it's too expensive for us. I just thought I would see more evidence of their existence even if I don't see them. I thought I would see more waste and blood spots. I was wondering how long it takes to get that out of control where you see more waste. Currently, I can't find new waste except for one small spot that I think is new. Anyway, we're waiting for that detector that uses dry ice to see what we're dealing with. I'm going to sleep outside when I use it so I'm actually scared about going outside.

    P.S. I cleared out most of my bedroom. I just have a sealed mattress on the floor and no box spring. It's made of material that is supposed to keep bedbugs out. I put duct tape over the zipper. I have a book shelf that is completely empty and a dresser with some things in it but not clothes. My clothes/books/everything is currently in other rooms so our place is messy I realize this could have spread them but I didn't like the idea of all my things in there.

    I'm currently not treating everything in dryers,etc. as if it's infested due to lack of current signs. It makes me feel like I'm treating a figment of my imagination. Perhaps this is denial. If the dectector shows them, I'll get more proactive again.

    I think we would resort to dry steaming our place a couple days a week to get rid of them if we detect them because it's chemical free.

  4. murukku

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Feb 8 2011 16:51:05
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    Hey I was wondering what the status of your possible infestation became? And if regularly cleaning plus dry steaming worked if there was a case of BB in your place?

  5. imbugginout

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Feb 11 2011 12:43:16
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    I would like to know the answer to this too. My roommates and I (but mostly me) have been getting bit for the past couple weeks, but we see no evidence. We had a guy come inspect who did a very poor job and couldn't really make up his mind either way, but suggested we treat anyway (of course.) But I just want some more solid evidence before I turn my apartment and life even more upside down than it is. Would waiting for more signs mean multiplying to the point of big time infestation and how long does that take? Thanks.

  6. toledo

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Feb 11 2011 16:28:04
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    Here is our approximate timeline:

    April-trip to Mexico
    June-bites appeared on daughter
    August-found first bed bug and treated room with heat
    October-found in climb-ups in two other rooms (two treatments with chemicals)
    January-bites appeared on son

  7. Beth

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 12 2011 10:28:34
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    for me it took six months to see a bug in an apartment I didn't treat, four in one I did with DE (I think the guy was struggling on the wall dehydrated and stuff). With climbups it took me four months to catch a bug. Fecal stains begin showing up within two months if you don't have dark sheets.

  8. Beth

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 12 2011 10:30:49
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    And ps, they mulitply rapidly. From my understanding, once you have a pregnant female in your home, it's sort of like having a queen bee. Please pco's correct me if I am wrong (as I may be on this one). A female lays a few eggs every day, or can, but when impregnated has hundreds to lay, so that queen can go around f'ing up your life for months and months and you can never find her, and then the breeding begins and more females get pregnant and then it's pretty much over. Like a colony, that's why you sort of have to find her harborage.

  9. jeffklein

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 12 2011 15:52:52
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    Bed Bugs lay 2-5 eggs per day. The females that stay with the pack typically lay on the lower end because of the traumatic insemination so they spend more resources repairing their exoskeleton. Once they get frustrated with the males and move away they will lay towards the higher end. Of course if your PCO uses an IGR like Gentrol these number double. Get climb-ups for the bed and there are also traps you can make at home using dry ice.

  10. so unsettling

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 12 2011 16:26:14
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    Once they get frustrated with the males and move away they will lay towards the higher end. Of course if your PCO uses an IGR like Gentrol these number double.

    I don't understand. They get frustrated with the males, and start laying more eggs? I thought Gentrol was about retarding development in nymphs. Why would it make the females lay more eggs?

    Maybe I am reading your post all wrong.

  11. Beth

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Feb 12 2011 21:22:28
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    But I was right, Jeff, correct, that a female only needs to be inseminated once to lay hundreds of eggs in a year's time? I am assuming this is one of the factors that makes eradication so difficult?

    thanks-
    Amy

  12. bait

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Feb 13 2011 11:49:40
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    You might find this information useful from the int'l atomic energy assoc. (They set standards for pest engineering for biocontrol. Very smart people.)

    http://www-naweb.iaea.org
    Population ecology
    The field of ecology dealing with the dynamics of populations within species, and the patterns in space and time of the interactions of these populations with environmental factors (NAL 2008). Study of the relationship between populations and their environment. Important characteristics of a population are, for example, population density, the distribution of individuals within the populated space, fertility, natality, and mortality. The growth of a population depends on its specific reproduction rate, and at first it proceeds exponentially. Indefinite unrestricted exponential growth is, however, not possible, because the environmental resources for each species are limited. [/b]Therefore, as the population size approaches the capacity limit of the environment, there is a large increase in the negative effects of density-dependent factors.[b] The result is a sigmoid growth curve (Scott 1996). [emphasis added if i did it right]

    Without reading entire books on this discipline, I've compiled my own list of factors gathered from various resources (including bedbugger), that should affect the number of individuals in a population.
    Not necessarily in this order:
    Insect strain (with aggregated mutations or lack thereof, i.e. thick cuticle)
    Room temperature and humidity
    Assortative mating
    Autocidal tendencies
    Natural enemies
    Direct and indirect pest control application
    Natural and artificial barriers
    Behavioral responses to environment
    The trade off of senescence for reproductive success
    Host specificity

    Bait


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