Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

heat gun vs steamer?

(11 posts)
  1. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Aug 30 2008 17:43:51
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Some heat guns go up to 1000 degrees and others have dual ranges of 6-800 and close to 1000.

    Obviously these are way too much for any fabric, wood, or anything other than bare metal.

    However there are some such as this that go much lower. Adjustable from 130-900 degrees.

    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/6NE90

    Given that the steamers have a tip temp on the steam of 220 or so why would they be more effective than a heat gun that could be adjusted down to that range as well?

    Do they have a higher volume of flow or something like that? I see the T630 can go to 58 PSI which is way more than a heat gun could probably do at 15 CFM.
    My guess is the pressure allows for deeper access of the heat into crevices so the BBs try to run away but the heat still gets them.

    The heat gun could be used at higher temps for hollow metal frames and such without mold worries.

    Jim

  2. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,966

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Aug 30 2008 18:03:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Jim

    The steam transmits the heat to the affected materials more efficiently than dry air.

    I suspect that the temperature falls off rather quickly as the air leaves the heat gun much like steam. You might try using an infrared thermometer to check the temps at the surface of the treated material & an oven temp probe to check for penetration of the heat.

    The general advice for using steam is to avoid using the high pressure tips & utilize the diffusion tips or wrap a towel around the tip to avoid blowing eggs & bugs around the room.

    An infrared camera could demonstrate the differences in penetration with a given material. I would think that steam might work more efficiently on textile surfaces.

  3. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Aug 30 2008 18:45:00
    #



    Login to Send PM

    I did try my electronics single temp gun using a quick read thermometer and about 6" away I was getting over 180.

    Don't have one of these yet but I am thinking about it. David in the UK, can correct me if I am wrong, said he only found little use for one in his experience and Killer Queen said they were useful but I can't dig up the thread.

    My feeling is for metal items they may be better than a steamer since there is no moisture and if you can measure the temp you can crank up the gun temp to have a nice low volume death breeze for eggs.

    The temps they can put out at max or the non adjustable could set stuff on fire so it is an item that would need clear headed precaution in use.

    Jim

  4. DougSummersMS

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 1,966

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Aug 30 2008 19:00:24
    #



    Login to Send PM

    The nonadjustable models may put out temps that are higher than the ignition temp of many items.

    Keeping a CO2 fire extinguisher handy might be a good idea.

  5. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Aug 30 2008 19:07:46
    #



    Login to Send PM

    DougSummersMS - 3 minutes ago  » 
    The nonadjustable models may put out temps that are higher than the ignition temp of many items.
    Keeping a CO2 fire extinguisher handy might be a good idea.

    Exactly Doug, that is why I'm looking at the adjustable ones. Paper goes at 451F which is well below what even the low powered ones or dual temp models put out on their "low" settings.

    A fire extinguisher is part of the safety precautions that would need to be taken. Hell everyone should have one in their house anyhow.

    Jim

  6. busy with my kids

    account closed
    Joined: Jun '08
    Posts: 57

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Aug 31 2008 1:18:38
    #



    Login to Send PM

    That seems like a good idea for some things. Thanks for posting it. If you end up using it, let us know. I live in a really humid place and I always worry about using a steamer.

  7. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Sep 5 2008 1:55:55
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Well I'll be picking one up tomorrow and at some point doing some testing. Don't have any bugs to kill but in an "uninfested" room there is some metal I'll heat up to test temps.

    Fire extinguisher at the ready of course.

    I can use it for electronics and various other projects not just bug killing missions.

    Jim

  8. cilecto

    oldtimer
    Joined: Aug '08
    Posts: 4,019

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jul 26 2009 21:09:30
    #



    Login to Send PM

    DougSummersMS - 11 months ago  » 
    Jim
    The steam transmits the heat to the affected materials more efficiently than dry air.

    So, (other than mold prevention) do we constantly hear the warnings to try our laundry "bone dry" or "2 hours", etc... In a decent dryer, wouldn't the moist heat take care of the BBs and the eggs?

    I was curious about the role of heatguns in BB treatment and was searching old posts and came across this one.

  9. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jul 26 2009 21:42:33
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Did do some testing but due to the sensitivity of the temperature adjustment I don't think it is safe enough unless constantly monitored. Just bumping the knob can boost it nearly 100F. I have a multimeter with a thermal probe that I tested with.

    The difference between 250 and 350 wasn't much. Items can begin to release toxic vapors at temps around 300.

    Also testing on an upholstered chair set to 250 it took a fair amount of time for the probe buried at the bottom to reach 150. The BBs would have hauled ass out of there. Eggs can't run though.

    Best thing it may be able to do is flush them out.

    Can't recommend it due to the fire potential.

    Jim

  10. Winston O. Buggy

    oldtimer
    Joined: May '07
    Posts: 997

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jul 27 2009 8:39:52
    #



    Login to Send PM

    You've touched on one plus and that is the penetration plus of dry steam, in addition you get that insect fry smell when you use a heat gun and it is even a slower process for anything of size than steam. I am also concerned about folks who are not savvy or used to working with things using a
    fire starter like a heat gun, although I am most familiar with the high and low models used for taking of paint or lifting tiles for old school termite work. But as we have learned many tools and strategies are of use in the battle against bbs. As an aside Jim thank you, for the flash point of paper, now I understand or may have forgotten why Bradburys named his book Fahrenheit 451.

  11. spideyjg

    oldtimer
    Joined: Jul '08
    Posts: 3,236

    offline

    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jul 27 2009 9:36:40
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Winston O. Buggy - 49 minutes ago  » 
    You've touched on one plus and that is the penetration plus of dry steam, in addition you get that insect fry smell when you use a heat gun and it is even a slower process for anything of size than steam. I am also concerned about folks who are not savvy or used to working with things using a
    fire starter like a heat gun, although I am most familiar with the high and low models used for taking of paint or lifting tiles for old school termite work.

    Exactly Winston. It is capable of far too high a temp, far too easy, and the speed of temp penetration is far too slow to replace a steamer.

    Now if you are in need of a heat gun for crafts, electronics, paint removal etc. This thing rocks!

    I can dial the heat or airflow down when working with heat shrink to have better control than the single temp or high/low ones I have used for 25+ years.

    Jim


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

184,352 posts in 28,323 topics over 87 months by 12,196 of 19,350 members. Latest: MANthrax, buggingcane, pecunianon
Site Meter