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Has Anyone tried CedarCide's " BEST YET" Does it work?

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  1. Lunabugged

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 19:59:20
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    I am a single handicapped mom with two kids in a three bedroom apartment on the third and top floor in a very bad bario/neighborhood with a slum lord for a management co that truly does the bare minimum to help their tenants especially the tenants with HUD based rent agreements that pay a percentage of their Social Security Disability for rent because the income as a whole is just the disability check and is so low. I have bought many products that say "Bio-friendly" and end up not being...and have harsh side effect. But I recently in studying medical journals came across Dr.Ben Oldeg and his contract with the Army, and the company "Cedarcide"...and their products called "BEST YET"...and all the marvelous things about it. Before I drop almost my entire check on the fogger and product can anyone tell me what they know of the product, or company, or if anyone has had positive or negative expierances with it? Has it worked effectively for anyone for BedBugs? It says 100% eradication....? Please help...if you have any knowledge...personal or learned or word of mouth can you please respond. I have already paid men to come throw away almost all my furniture except for one bookshelf,a singer sewing machine table, tv stand,little asian table my kids eat at, and the matresses on the floor. The rest all of it...IS GONE! Wrapped with thick plastic like the best wrapped gifts in the world so it would drop anything going down the steps I now sit, and the kids sit in lawn chairs and clothes are bagged up and being washed in borax, one outfit a night..as my dryer is broken and takes an entire day almost more to dry one load. I have to be ready with one outfit for each kid 36 hours before they wear it to school. I am living out of plastic buckets and its horrible. I am losing my mind. If anyone knows anything about these products please tell me. Also if you , used another product that actually WORKED please tell me, share. I will be forever in your debt.
    Broke,Losing Mind, Desperate in Maryland,
    Lunabugged

  2. bugbasher

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 20:44:24
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    Luna,
    One of the pco's who posts here was lookimg into it a couple of months ago.I don't know what he concluded,but do a search here with the name cedarcide and it should lead you to the post and you can pm him for any info he has learned.Good luck

  3. Lunabugged

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 28 2008 21:34:16
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    Thank you so much,I will do that immediatley! I appreciate the quick response!

    Best!

    Luna

  4. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jun 5 2008 17:10:57
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    I have requested information on any studies done on the product but was told they were not available yet.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  5. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jun 5 2008 18:04:48
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    Hi NoBugs,

    Drop me an email and I will forward what I have. They sent a report and a MSDS sheet when I replied to an email they sent me.

    I have requested trial data to look at but it did take two attempts to get a MSDS from them.

    David

  6. bug hater

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Sep 4 2009 12:20:54
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    See below (sorry)

  7. bug hater

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Sep 4 2009 12:22:13
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    I found this new product. It's just a spray can, but unfortunately is not all natural. It's called PRONTO, and I purchased it at Fry's (a Kroger grocery store). It's around $8 a can, and is awesome!! It worked great. We sprayed just in the master bedroom because of the kids and dogs, and we didn't have bedbugs for about a month. Once it was dry (later that day), it was a camp out for us and our kids in our room until we could spray in the other rooms. The only reason we started getting them again was because we had someone stay at our house for about a week, and he decided to stay in a room we hadn't sprayed in yet. He would take his pillow and blanket in other parts of the house and they spread again. We're saving up to be able to spray everywhere this time. It's an 1800sq ft house, so it's going to take a lot of spray. I have also noticed vacuuming everyday, washing and drying on hot, and steamers work wonders. You have to empty your vacuum right after you are done though. We toss the sheets, blankets, and pillows in the dryer for about 20min (15-20 on high kills them, and washing on hot boils them dead) before we go to bed if we see any. We got a clothes steamer from Big Lots for like $20, and borrowed one of those Shark floor steamers w the carpet attachment to get the general carpet area and curtains. The heat from those kill them as well.
    Well, good luck everyone. And Luna, I hope that they fix your dryer soon.

  8. spideyjg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Nov 8 2009 16:33:34
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    You sound like an ad.

    Shenanigans!

    Jim

  9. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Nov 8 2009 17:11:59
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    You applied BY and your roaches went away? Cause or co incidence? This site is about BEDBUGS, which is a FAR MORE COMPLICATED pest. What's your experience eradicating bedbugs AND PREVENTING OUTBREAKS WITHIN A FEW WEEKS with this substance?

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  10. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Nov 8 2009 22:34:56
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    bug hater - 2 months ago  » 
    I found this new product... PRONTO...great. We sprayed just in the master bedroom...we didn't have bedbugs for about a month. Once it was dry (later that day), it was a camp out for us and our kids in our room until we could spray in the other rooms. The only reason we started getting them again was because we had someone stay at our house for about a week, and he decided to stay in a room we hadn't sprayed in yet. He would take his pillow and blanket in other parts of the house and they spread again. We're saving up to be able to spray everywhere this time.

    Welcome, Bug Hater, What you have there, is a very "qualified" victory. BB eradication is often a more complex matter than a simple spray all over. It's really a matter of how you apply, where and when vs. what. "Pronto" is Church & Dwight's (aka "Arm & Hammer") brand for Phenothrin-Multicide, same active ingredient as Bedlam, Sprayway-Good-Night and others. Fairly well-known and common product. Some, but limited action against eggs, which hatch every week or two and give you fresh grief. It's easy to speculate that your recurrence was because of "X" or "Y", but in reality (at least as far as I understand it), it's hard to know. Also, what works for you may or may not work for someone else in a different situation. Also, it's generally recommended that once your tratment is dry, you actually go live in your space. This is because most treatments have short lifespans, whereas BB are content to go hide in their crevices for months in wait of food. You return when the poison has worn off and the bugs are ready for their meals without poison to cross. Your apprehension over spraying the entire house is justified, as it may not be necessary, if your infestation is localized.

    This is a great site, with education and support and I encourage you to take advantage of the people and the information.

    Best of luck.

  11. Luanne Poindexter

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Nov 9 2009 1:10:56
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    I don't know what product really kills bedbugs yet but I did read that rubbing your body with Lavender Lotion keeps them from biting and I bought 3 bottles at the 99cent store and I haven't been bitten yet. I also bought some lavender epsom salts and bath in that before I put on the lotion. Works like a charm.

  12. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Nov 9 2009 1:31:31
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    Luanne Poindexter - 19 minutes ago  » 
    I don't know what product really kills bedbugs yet but I did read that rubbing your body with Lavender Lotion keeps them from biting and I bought 3 bottles at the 99cent store and I haven't been bitten yet. I also bought some lavender epsom salts and bath in that before I put on the lotion. Works like a charm.

    Did not work for me.

    Note: Cedarcide spam removed above.

  13. watkinsnewan

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Nov 9 2009 12:55:23
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    I thought about using this... Glad I didn't.. I was still thinking about ordering some...NOT NOW...Any other suggestions for OTC Spot treatment...(Preferably from Walmart) that is safe around kids besides Murphys ( It is harsh On the throat) and I cant find the 91 percent alcohol any where..

  14. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Nov 9 2009 13:28:37
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    Maverick PCO Richard Fagerlund has a formula in this article. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/05/12/DDAN17IOE9.DTL
    water, alcohol, dish liquid (you can reduce the % of water to compensate for lack of 91%). YMMV.

    Also, consider a respirator effective against mists.

  15. silvesro

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 6:05:45
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    Yes, it works. I used it in a 15 unit rooming house, when all the pros failed, and the bugs spread to every unit. One spray through out every room and they were gone. Tennants could stay in rooms after spraying. Be sure to spray all edges and crevises. Wash bedding and clothes in hot water and hot dryer. Put vasaline on bed legs and a 3 inch smear along wall where bed is and keep bed away from wall, until bugs are gone. Your mattress is on floor, put masking tape 2 inch wide around matress, a foot away and smear tape completly with vasaline for now. Get a cheap plastic, zipper cover from sears, or better yet, throw the mattress out and get another one used. but check carefully when buying it. All seems, pull them back. Look carefully. Every inch of seem. You will see them. When home, spray all seams, cover in plastic cover, be sure not to tear. Hidden bugs will come out in about 10 days for more food from walls. Oil should kill them. Has a long life , but lightly spray again anyway about 10 days after first. Do not buy fogger. The spray bottle is sufficient.
    It works well, so dont waste it by using too much. I used a quart per room, about 10x15.
    You will get bugs again, because the other units have them, Iam sure. And they will find way in.
    So maintain the barriers of vasaline on walls and legs, around bed. I know it is a pain, but teach the kids not to step in it. And spray occasionally. Borax will not kill them. Only very hot watter, and hi heat for at least 20 mi. And move up north where the bugs are not so prevalent and people are treated with respect from landlords. I know this is a year late, but hopefully you have solved the problem or are still monitoring this site. God bless you and see you through this bad time in your life. Put it in His hands.

  16. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 10:10:29
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    MSDS for the product includes hydrated silica
    http://jple.cedarcide.com/bestyet/pdfdata/bestyetmsds.pdf
    Wikipedia implies that HS is basically silica (DE is one form) and water.
    http://en.m.wikipedia.com/wiki?search=Hydrated+silica
    So, the product's action may well derive more from the silica than from the cedar oil.
    That said, I'd like to understand more about SRO's approach. It came after several rounds of PCO treatment. Let's not discount their contribution here. Petroleum jelly was applied as a barrier. Are residents respecting this or rubbing it away? What about the bed frames themselves? How many bug free days since treatment is it? Is the cedar repelling the bugs, if so where have they gone and how is that place faring?
    How does the product compare in cost and effectiveness against a "Richard Fagerlund" type of mix (alcohol, detergent, silica, water)?

  17. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 10:59:49
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    > better yet, throw the mattress out and get another one used. but check carefully when buying it.

    ARE YOU FREAKING SANE???

    I'm very wary of this move.

  18. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 11:28:20
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    Post updated by author (12/29/09 11:09 pm):

    silvesro's response spammed reinstated. Note: his/her only other post on the site is another CedarCide plug. However, given the study just announced by Jeff White here, it does seem there is some data on effectiveness.

    Sorry, though -- "one spray and my 15-room rooming house was completely cured of bed bugs forever" set off my BS meter.

    I am not saying the product doesn't work -- we really don't know.

    But I suspect it is not a miracle, magic, "one shot and all bed bugs are gone forever" cure.

    I encourage the manufacturer to have entomologists independently test it.

  19. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Dec 29 2009 11:33:18
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    > silvesro's response spammed.

    Darn. It was so rich in "teachable moments".

  20. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 0:11:12
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    Since there have been more developments with CedarCide Best Yet today, please see my revised post above.

    Ci, if you got it, teach it!

  21. bait

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 0:17:07
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    Even if it's not the magic bullet, it's another weapon in the arsenal.

    Thanks everybody, esp. JWhite. I look forward to the study.

  22. silvesro

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 2:33:41
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    I fought the bed bugs and I won. No, this is not spam. Yes, I have a post on another site. No, the pros had no effect on the victory. Only wasted my time. After they sprayed, the bugs were back very quickly. Bugs do not become imune to natural products, only man made products. I did not say bugs gone forever. This is a 3 story 100 yr old wood bld. The bugs crawled all thru it. It takes a long time for them to get anywhere. Occasionally they find thier way into another room. I am constantly inspecting and checking with tennants. The bld stayed clean for about 8 months. Then they appeared again in a couple of rooms. One spray again cleared them. Even the vapour of the product will kill. I also bought a another product, not near so expensive, that I use on a more continual basis. Hallways, any ceiling openings,ect. It is also a natureal product, not harmful to people. But the cedar is my first line of defence. Yes cedar IS the magic bullet. It saved most of my tennents from moveing out. Some did leave.
    The only BS on this site is Nobugs on me, I wonder if he ever tryed it, or has seen a bug, or maybe he is a PRO and is not having any success. The cedar does not repel the bugs. It kills them. I found many, many dead bugs within 24 hr. They dont go nowhere.
    The vasaline was a temp solution I used at the same time, until I knew if the cedar worked. Also it lets me know if another round of bugs show up, as they get caught in the vase on the walls, placed a few inches above floor around the bed only. What you catch is the baby ones, that come out of hiding. There is a long residual time for the cedar effectivness. As I find dead baby ones, that hatch later on who have been deep enought to escape first spray. So I dont use vase anymore. No need. I only told her to use it around bed on floor, because bed is on floor, as a temp measure. Dont throw away mattress! Obvious her bed is full of bugs. And she cant afford a new one. The bugs will just go to sleep if mat is covered, and come out again, when a rip happens, and it will. All my mattress are used, and I have 4 bld and sixty tennants and sixty matresses. This is the only bld infected. I inspect very carefully and use only used suppliers I trust. Also they are now sprayed before install. Yes, teachable moments, but only for the teachable. Are you? Trust me, I know it works.

  23. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 7:55:32
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    Silverso,

    If you want people around here to take your testimony seriously, it might be wise to avoid statements like this one:

    Bugs do not become imune to natural products, only man made products.

    Many items that people, bugs, or germs develop resistance to are, in fact, natural products. Penicillin is a natural product, and plenty of germs have developed resistance to it.

    I can't see any reason that bed bugs couldn't develop resistance to a natural product if a chemical in the product is part of how that product works to kill the bugs. If the product is a mechanical killer (like DE), then resistance shouldn't be an issue. However, Jeff's report on Cedarcide suggests that it may be partly mechanical, so that may be why the bugs don't appear to be developing resistance to it. If that's the case, however, people who use cedar oil that isn't part of this particular formulation won't see those results, which is why a lot of us are so careful about not making broad claims on the boards. We really don't want desperate people to get inaccurate information, which is why we want so much proof before we'll post endorsing something that we don't have a lot of data on.

    As someone who went through treatment with very few chemical pesticides, I would be thrilled to see confirmed studies proving that cedar oil based products were effective; however, we haven't seen those studies yet, so I can't ringingly endorse on public boards like this a product that looks promising in lab tests but on which we don't have reliable data about how it performs in the field.

    It's definitely on the list of "things to look into in more depth" but cedar hasn't yet graduated to my list of "things I can recommend without reservation to anyone suffering from bed bugs."

  24. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 8:58:06
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    > The only BS on this site is Nobugs on me, I wonder if he ever tryed it, or has seen a bug, or maybe he is a PRO and is not having any success.

    Thank you for clearing that up. I thought no bugs with was someone who did a great job of bringing together serious practitioners and lay people to discuss a serious topic like adults. Obviously based on what you've told us that is not so. I also thought no bugs was a woman.

    SilveSRO I'm coming to the conclusion that you are not who you say you are and your story is bogus.

  25. silvesro

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 10:50:00
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    I joined this site, only to share my story to see if it would help others. But I have been called a BSer, bogus, lier, etc. It would seem the "experts" have a real problem, with a lay person who has had success.
    When i read on no bugs site, an excelent site by the way, the problems the SA and others are having with the experts, I am very suspicious of their ability to eradicate. Again the cedar works. Try it for yourself. "Penicillin is a natural product." It is a man made product. A far cry from natural penicillin.
    I may not be correct in all I say, but the cedar works.

  26. silvesro

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Dec 30 2009 11:02:32
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    By the way cilecto, who do you you think I am. The masked ranger. My name is Robert Silvester. I live in Thunder Bay, Ont., Canada. Iam the largest rooming house operater in town. Have been for 40 yr.
    An avid golfer and guitarest. Married. Have a very close extended family. Owned a fittness center for 27 yr and Iam an electrician. Anything else you need to know to verify my non bogus status, let me know. Or drop up and see me sometime. Iam in the book.

  27. buggyinsocal

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    Wed Dec 30 2009 12:47:52
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    I'm pretty sure penicillin is a refinement of a naturally occurring mold.

    Just as digitialis comes from the Foxglove plant.

    Lithium is a naturally occurring chemical that we use to treat bipolar disorder.

    I don't see any hard scientific evidence that the metabolisms of individual people cannot change how people react to those drugs.

    The PMPs here might be able to tell you if Abamectin is something pests have developed resistance to. If I recall correctly, it's a gel bait used to control ants and roaches (or was used to control roaches back in the early 1990s) that was derived from a naturally occurring microorganism in soil.

    Plenty of our contemporary chemicals are simply more concentrated forms of chemicals that occur in nature.

    I'm a crunchy, granola type who would be thrilled to see an affordable, accessible protocol that didn't involve chemical pesticides. I opted for thermal which solved my bed bug problem in one go, but it's expensive-looking up front. Thermal seemed the best option to me partly because of my own reservations about exposure to chemical pesticides. However, it can cause structural damage if done improperly, and it's and not widely available. As a result, now that I've been here more than 18 months, I've come to realize that I have to advocate for there to be a variety of treatments available around the world to give everyone the best chance to fight bed bugs effectively. Some landlords will never spring for thermal; some climates don't allow the use of Vikane year round. Even if the Canadian government approved Vikane, it wouldn't be available for parts of the year. Some people couldn't afford thermal or Vikane on a whole structure.

    Since bed bugs are a pest of exposure, and since we know that they can become resistant to some treatments, in order to solve the bed bug problem, as a society, the approach most likely to get us effective control is an approach that offers every bed bug sufferer a variety of options. That also means giving pest management pros a wide arsenal of tools.

    I know that most people can be exposed to today's chemical pesticides, when applied properly, and not have health issues; but a certain, small percentage of the population is very sensitive to them. In addition, a larger percentage of the population is afraid of them (a fear I can understand given how many times various chemicals have been hailed as safe only to be found years later to have disastrous consequences we hadn't anticipated). Given that those two things are true, and given how horrible bed bugs can be for people to suffer with, I'm a strong advocate for pursuing *any* new treatment that looks promising.

    Cedar oil looks promising. I hope someone starts field testing it. If the data from the field tests supports your anecdotal evidence, I will be the first person to sing the praises of cedar oil.

    Saying that it's the magic bullet based only on anecdotal evidence, however, is a definite case of post hoc ergo propter hoc which is the Latin name for a common logical fallacy known as a hasty generalization. In layperson's terms, a hasty generalization is jumping to a conclusion before there's enough data in. If it rains the day after I wash my car and I conclude that washing my car caused it to rain, I'm guilty of falling into a hasty generalization because I'm overlooking many other factors that might have caused the rain to fall (like high and low pressure systems meeting over my location, for example, or the remnants of a tropical storm pulling into town).

    If I said, hey, everybody, go use cedarcide, and it turns out that it's the silica in the spray, not the cedar oil itself, I would have some culpability in the suffering that people who tried using cedar oil instead of Cedarcide went through, and I don't want to steer people in the wrong direction because bed bugs suck enough without being accidentally lied to on a board you go to seeking help.

    Until we have that data, however, we're dealing with an unknown, and bed bug infestations already generate an awful lot of unknowns.

    If you want to convince everyone, however, it probably behooves you not to use exaggeration or absolute statements or logically unsound moves in your argument People tend not to trust the credibility of people who leap to too quick conclusions, and since I want to see pest management people pursue cedar oil as a possible tool in the war, I actually do want your arguments to be as effective as possible.

    If actually convincing other people to pursue cedar oil as a possibility isn't your goal, then I guess your credibility as you advocate for it isn't a priority which is fine if that's your thing. I just thought that you were interested in convincing people to consider cedar as a viable option; if you don't want feedback on how effectively that argument is coming across to at least some readers, I certainly won't take the time to respond any more.

  28. Nobugsonme

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    Sun Aug 1 2010 1:04:49
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    silvesro - 7 months ago  » 

    The only BS on this site is Nobugs on me, I wonder if he ever tryed it, or has seen a bug, or maybe he is a PRO and is not having any success. The cedar does not repel the bugs. It kills them. I found many, many dead bugs within 24 hr. They dont go nowhere.

    Since apparently this discussion with Silvesro continues on this thread, I want to respond to Silvesro's comments. Silvesro, I welcome your specific statements of what exactly I have said which is BS.

    However, you are wrong. CedarCide Best Yet may repel bed bugs. It has been advertised as such by the manufacturer in the past, though they may be avoiding such statements now, having realized it's not desirable with treating bed bugs.

    This is Changlu Wang's report on his tests of the product, which note the repellent properties. Wang says he is interested in further study of the repellency of this product.

    The AUGUST 2009 Efficacy Report For CedarCide's BEST YET Organic Bed Bug Killer, also here, notes,

    The manufacturer of “Best Yet” advertises the product as being repellent to a number of insects. In addition Dr. Wang’s work also suggests that bed bugs are repelled by the cedar oil product. Depending upon the degree of repellency, the effectiveness of the dry residue could be greatly affected in the field as insects that are not forced to remain on the treated surface may look to avoid treated areas.

  29. Beth

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 17:09:55
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    I have not tried Cedarcide, thinking about it. Tried literally everything else, including vikane and heat treating in a packtite and dryer. The cedarcide makes sense. It is not just the hydrated silica which kills them so effectively. From watching the video, it seems the silica cuts their exoskeleton allowing the cedar oil an easy route to kill them quick. My guess is the bed bugs exoskeleton is so strong you need to cut it open before poisoning it. It's actually a brilliant strategy, and one that Fagerlund endorses, whether or not directly, by using contact killers along with diatomaceous earth. I'd be interested to see what putting the DE into a bottle with alcohol and dish soap would do. You've got the sharp fossil shells, the dessicant, the toxin and the surfactants. But it does make sense to separate the two steps for an even distribution of DE. Wonder if there is some way to suspend it? I may buy cedarcide, the spray, if our latest assault and measures fail, and I will report.

    As a last resort to try to avoid the bugs from going into other areas of my house, we just sprayed "Rest Easy" in our living room, which I suspect, with its list of oils never proven to kill bed bugs and only one proven to repel, will have no value, though it smells super cinnamony right now. I bought it because there is a study that shows it kills on contact and repels for 30 minutes. Eh, better than dousing the place in alcohol. I'm cooking up a eucalyptus cedar oil spray for repellancy outside the bedroom with Dr. Bronner's eucalyptus soap and real cedar oil. You don't need a lot of the oil, just 6 drops in a spray bottle will do. There are other, more rare essential oils, that have a track record with bed bugs in other countries, repelling and contact kill. Palo Santo is one I believe it is called.

    Also, don't repel them where they can get their easiest meal, or you risk spreading them everywhere. We sprayed the Fagerlund mixture in our bedroom, followed up with DE along baseboards and a ring around the bed, very light dusting. Will have to try the vaseline on the wall trick and carpet tape too. The climbups, while they definitely let me get a good night's rest, only served to spread the bugs to my living room in my last place trying to find some blood. This is war, and we'll win it on the ground.

    I don't need anymore research beyond what has already been done to convince me cedarcide works. It is easy to understand why, if you understand chemistry and biology basics. Expose-Poison. The trick is getting all the buggers, and still I wonder how it continues to kill and kills the eggs, which it is proposed to do (and found effective, at 67%--better than any pesticide--on direct spray of eggs). What makes it effective as a residual, if it is (this it seems was not tested by Rutgers)? Because testimonials and instructions are one or two sprays and they are gone, which means it must have residual properties or repellancy so strong it lasts for months or years. Unless every single customer review is by a cedarcide representative, and I find that hard to believe. No one here spams a "deadly toxic chemical mix worked great on my infestation!" It's like, "GREAT! You got rid of them and poisoned your entire family! Good for you!" Why are the all natural things spammed or criticized? If chemicals are indeed, which they are, derived from natural sources, than there is something in nature that kills these things beyond the masked hunter. Chrysanthemum ain't working anymore. Let's find another natural enemy of theirs--it's out there.

    I say, ditch the pyrethrins. What a waste of time and toxic to boot. Put some money into researching essential oils and dessicants. That's where it's at for folks who can't afford thermal. Vikane, apparently, is not done right too often.

    Oh, and I have to agree--penicillin is not found in nature. It is derived from a natural mold, yes. But scientists must heat it to degrees not found in nature, and then mix it with several preservatives, fillers and mold growth inhibitors. You can't just eat mold on a piece of bread for its antibiotic properties. Just like "Rest Easy" is not really "all natural" with its "sodium lauryth sulfate". It's just that it's not toxic. All natural would be like rubbing the chrysanthemum flower all over your bed (hehe). There is no telling why humans become immune to some things, natural or otherwise, or why they become allergic. I mean, yes there is, it's the immune system doing its wonderful thing, but I don't know enough about pest biology to know if they even have an immune system or what is their deal. WHAT DO THEY WANT FROM US? (aside from blood, that's obvious)

    If you can't tell, I got no sleep last night-
    Amy

  30. Nobugsonme

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    Sun Nov 28 2010 20:42:21
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    Amy,

    I am still very concerned about the fogging machine Cedarcide is recommending. We've been given good reasons why that is not a good idea regardless of the product inside.

  31. nycyn

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    Sun Nov 28 2010 21:26:00
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    watkinsnewan - 1 year ago  » 
    I thought about using this... Glad I didn't.. I was still thinking about ordering some...NOT NOW...Any other suggestions for OTC Spot treatment...(Preferably from Walmart) that is safe around kids besides Murphys ( It is harsh On the throat) and I cant find the 91 percent alcohol any where..

    I know this is an older post but I've seen this a few times lately--difficulty in finding 91% rubbing alcohol. I find it unbelievable but I believe it. Here that's ALL they sell at the pharmacy retail stores.

    Question: It has to be precisely 91% or more. ALso it can't be cut down with water?

    What about cheap booze in a pinch? Don't laugh but I use cheap vodka and gin for cleaning those things nothing else will--like the kitchen floor. Can one use some in a pinch? Like that unused bottle behind the sink that you got for Christmas 7 years ago? That's where I get my floor cleaner as I prefer Bud Lite. I don't know if it is cost effective or not to get a half gallon of the cheapest clear booze available as compared to rubbing alcohol. I haven't checked that out. And I'm assuming booze has at least 91% alcohol here...

  32. Beth

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 23:00:10
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    Nobugs,

    I would be wary about the fogger as well.

    There are people with sensitivities to essential oils. I was told to start off with 3 drops in a spray bottle to see if I tolerated cedar oil, and graduate up to 6 drops. There is a way to fog with just plain old cedar oil using a kind of essential oil vaporizer (I forget what it is called), and I'd trust this more than the unknown entities in cedarcide being thrown about everywhere. Silica everywhere (regardless if its food grade or not, and cedarcide doesn't say), isn't a good idea to douse your place with. I am very unfamiliar with "hydrated silica" and from what I read it appears to be amorphous, but it's very confusing. I am more interested in the spray and following it up with DE. Or if a fogger is used, vacating the premises for a good span of time if it does indeed kill them all in one shot, and cleaning before residing. It may make an interesting way to debug between tenants. I don't know. I'd need to know more about the silica.

    Amy

  33. bushbugg

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    Sun Nov 28 2010 23:52:43
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    nycyn - 2 hours ago  » 
    Question: It has to be precisely 91% or more. ALso it can't be cut down with water?
    What about cheap booze in a pinch? Don't laugh but I use cheap vodka and gin for cleaning those things nothing else will--like the kitchen floor. Can one use some in a pinch? .

    HAha, I dont think cheap booze would work, because it has to be 91% alcohol. Drinking alcohol goes up to 200 proof. Meaning, 2 proof is 1% alcohol. You would have to find a vodka that is 182 proof, and I am not sure there is any that goes that high. and if it is that high, it probably isnt cheap.

    But, good idea. A quick google says: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/269748 it isnt legal some places, but it is buyable.

    However, my bottle of 91% cvs alcohol was 3 dollars. in New York City.

  34. Nobugsonme

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    Sun Nov 28 2010 23:53:31
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    My concern with the fogger is more about the fact that we've been told this method disperses bed bugs, spreading them deeper into the home. I would be very worried about that.

    (Not that I'm not worried about health effects! I just want to be quite clear because there are always others who'll say, "I don't care about that, let me kill them now!" And it's important to be clear that we don't know this fogging method will kill them and there's a lot of reason to think it may make problems worse, as it does when you fog with other substances.)

  35. nycyn

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    Mon Nov 29 2010 0:20:52
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    bushbugg - 24 minutes ago  » 

    nycyn - 2 hours ago  » 
    Question: It has to be precisely 91% or more. ALso it can't be cut down with water?
    What about cheap booze in a pinch? Don't laugh but I use cheap vodka and gin for cleaning those things nothing else will--like the kitchen floor. Can one use some in a pinch? .

    HAha, I dont think cheap booze would work, because it has to be 91% alcohol. Drinking alcohol goes up to 200 proof. Meaning, 2 proof is 1% alcohol. You would have to find a vodka that is 182 proof, and I am not sure there is any that goes that high. and if it is that high, it probably isnt cheap.
    But, good idea. A quick google says: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/269748 it isnt legal some places, but it is buyable.
    However, my bottle of 91% cvs alcohol was 3 dollars. in New York City.

    Hm. And people drink that stuff?

    Interesting is that I've been hounding my pharmacist to get me some Ethyl alcohol for making herbal tinctures and stuff. I used to be able to get it in Jersey but that was a long time ago. I think in your link it said it is illegal in NY.

    I guess that leaves us with--does it HAVE to be 91%? And, anybody commute from Jersey to Manhattan?

    (And another thing--it looks like it was more raucous here once. )


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