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Ebola (sorry have to ask)

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  1. kirads09

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 13:19:12
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    Perhaps best for Lou, but anyone who might have an answer.

    How does Ebola affect bb's - or would it at all. I mean it stands to reason (in my simple mind) if they fed on a person or animal who was infected - it would kill them? Or could they spread Ebola (I know it is commonly held that BB's cannot transmit but with this ?) I know it may sound ignorant. BB's are the least of your worries with this disease outbreak but I have been wondering.

    Sidenote: A little nervous. I work at a University. I happen to work in the Purhasing/Accounts Payable area so I see all the invoices. I know from the Pest control ones there ARE many reports of BB's in the dorms. I have not seen any for other offices or classrooms as of yet (been here about 1 1/2 years now). Is it surprising they haven't spread more rapidly considering the travel of students and staff all over campus?

  2. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 13:30:37
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    Interesting question. And OMG! Ebola carrying bed bugs. That's the thing nightmares are made of!
    -

  3. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 13:34:46
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    Hi,

    There is zero risk in reality.

    I doubt the same surface markers that ebola uses to be "taken up my host cells" exist in insects as so far only mammalian hosts have been reported.

    The physiological features of bedbugs and how they have evolved mean they do not carry the same blood borne pathogen risks as mosquitoes and other blood feeders do. Their feeding mechanisms evolved down separate evolutionary paths a long time ago.

    This only leave a physical transmission option such as was "scare mongered" with MRSA but the reality is that a BB in such locations has a lower risk profile of transmission than a fly or a coach roach.

    Ebola is only passed through contact with bodily fluids of an infected person and as such has a very low transmission rate until symptoms are evident.

    As such I am hopeful that all professionals we see the need to be clear that there is no discernible risk of Ebola and bedbugs ever being connected.

    With regards the student halls it reminds me of a client in London who spent over £50,000 the year before we got involved and what seemed to be a problem out of control and all over the building was tamed in less than 1 month and now they only get 3 - 5 cases a year around tourist season. There are better ways of working than just reacting in the same fashion time after time.

    Ebola is a nasty virus and its a shame that the world did not see the need to help out others before it reached its doorstep and started to cause panic. My hat is off to the US news presenter who bucked the media trend by speaking the facts and truth rather than the hype the other day, its very disrespectful to those who are actually on the front line dealing with people who are actually a risk of infection by virtue of the fact that they are dealing with sick people and not a media hysteria. There are very few people who will put themselves at such risks because their actions do save lives and come with real world risks.

    Hope that puts any fear well and truly to rest.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

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    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  4. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 13:54:36
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    So, David, are you saying that a bedbug wouldn't be able to transmit contaminated blood from one person to another? TIA

  5. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 14:15:06
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    Hi,

    Yes, in short.

    The only way that they could would be as a physical mechanism on the surface of the stylet they use to pierce the skin. I am not sure what the ebola viability outside of a host is but often with viruses the more severe the virus the lower its out of body viability. Given that bedbugs typically feed every 3 - 5 days it works in your favor.

    So unless we have the freak occurrence of a bedbug feeding on a highly infectious ebola patient and then immediately onto the next non infected occupant of the bed, which itself is not "normal" behavior the risk is basically zero. Now for those who are worried about that scenario the bad news is that you already have ebola because of the close contact with the infected person that is needed to make that happen so I doubt you want to blame the who issue on the bedbugs.

    If you look into the finer detail of the mosquito feeding process you will see the females carry a blood borne pathogen risk because during feeding they can inject some of their feeding tract contents into the new food source. This can include some of the previous meal and thus an infectious agent.

    While I was training as a pest controller my boss found it hilarious that he was able to send the university graduate into the nastiest of jobs. Now I don't wish to be too graphic here but I am sure you all appreciate that there is a massive health risk when entering a home of someone who died week / months ago and has been feeding their own zoo of insect life for most of that time. If such people decided to follow media hype line such work would not get done and the surface of society would not appear as clean as it does.

    This is why I made the point about not being hysterical out of respect to those who do such essential front line work. Its rarely a well paid job for the one doing the work and on at least one occasion I have done such work for free out of respect to the family who were going through enough without having to deal with the mess that had been created in the persons sudden departure from this mortal coil.

    So yes bedbugs and ebola is a fear too far for me and one that needed to be nipped immediately in the bud.

    David

  6. BigDummy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 14:54:01
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    I would imagine if you were in a position to contract ebola from a bed bug you've got greater exposure issues.

    In Florida we are required to provide a hurricane slab and hurricane straps to all HVAC condenser units. Another scenario where if that becomes a concern you're already fornicated.

    Killer of bed bugs for Homeless Empowerment Program
  7. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 15:01:47
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    Thanks for the information David and BD!

    Agreed that any hysteria regarding Ebola needs to be nipped in the bud. Hysteria does nothing to help with the problem. Everyone needs to maintain a level head.

  8. kirads09

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Oct 17 2014 16:53:03
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    Appreciate the information and level heads prevailing.

  9. Chicagobbordrocks

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 18 2014 11:39:51
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    Regarding hysteria and Ebola: A similar situation exists for bed bugs. We americans
    get paranoid about things. Prohibition was an example from an earlier period when
    we tried to eliminate any drinking whatsoever. The Chicago bed bug ordinance is
    another. It is preposterous to have a mandate to eliminate all bedbugs from the
    City of Chicago.

    Recently, a case study participation was offered in my area for people suffering from
    dust mite allergies. Give me a break, people have to live with certain things. You
    have to be able to live with dust mites. As I understand though in addition to
    bed bug encasements there are commercial encasements for mattresses for those
    suffering from allergies.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 18 2014 13:47:49
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    Hi,

    Sorry Chicago, I passed in your suggestion that people have to be able to live with dust mites to a friend.

    I can't repeat her reply other than last time she tried she ended up in ER being resuscitated as she is in fact highly allergic to them and they trigger her asthma.

    Unless you understand the full spectrum of situations and possibilities you can fall into pitfalls by advising something that seems logical until you know more facts.

    After all those in East Aftica would have less Ebola if they used more hand sanitizer.

    David

  11. Chicagobbordrocks

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Oct 19 2014 14:50:04
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    Dave,

    I see. Walmart lists for sale an all-in-one encasement which protects against dust
    mites as well as bed bugs among other things.

    I wonder how they coped with dust mite allergy prior to the availability of this
    type of product.

    chicagobbordrocks

    http://www.walmart.com/ip/MicronOne-BeneSleep-Asthma-and-Allergy-Mattress-Encasement/10759964

  12. Chicagobbordrocks

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Oct 19 2014 14:55:47
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    Regarding bed bugs/ebola and paranoia. On TV last night, the president called for a
    racheting down on the paranoia regarding ebola. Some people have called for grounding of
    all flights between the United States and the West African nations.

    Neither of these events occurred for bed bugs. For the second situation, they would have to
    ground all flights altogether for bed bugs (bed bugs are everywhere) to accomplish the same
    objective.

  13. Koebner

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Oct 19 2014 16:42:17
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    On allergies, even a cursory glance at current allergy research would be enough for you to know that; allergies are vastly more prevalent, particularly in the developed world, than once they were. Far more people now have life-threatening allergies than was the case as little as 30 years ago. We do not yet know why this is the case, though research is ongoing & a number of interesting correlations have emerged. Dust mite encasements are a response to a growing population of highly reactive allergy sufferers.

    In the past, those few individuals who had severe reactions to dust mites dealt with the problem by dying prematurely.

  14. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Oct 19 2014 18:23:48
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    Chicagobbordrocks - 3 hours ago  » 

    I wonder how they coped with dust mite allergy prior to the availability of this
    type of product.
    chicagobbordrocks

    Hmm Chic Gob Rocks,

    For the most part exceptionally well through the use of vacuuming to remove the allergens from the mattress.

    After a while encasements became popular as they provide a physical barrier between the mite droppings and humans, then memory foam arrived and became the product of choice.

    Thankfully before the bottom fell out of the market some feckless entomologist agreed to take money to claim encasements were essential for bedbugs and tey were able to see growth again. Unfortunately someone in Europe pointed out that bedbugs don't give a monkeys if you have a wiggle bag or not on your home bed when you encounter them at a hotel or a public space and those in the EU listened.

    I guess it's all down to market forces, some markets want to scalp people in need while others are more ethical.

    Go figure.

    David

  15. loubugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Oct 20 2014 8:12:39
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    The only way that they could would be as a physical mechanism on the surface of the stylet they use to pierce the skin.

    I think we are missing the point here. Bed bugs defecate and at times can be squished. The virus doesn't have to be actively incubated in the arthropod like tick-transmitted and mosquito-borne diseases (bacteria, viruses, protists): these disease organisms are intricately entwined in the life cycle of the hosts and vectors.
    Ebola is a different virus from those that are internally vectored; this one is physically transferred on surfaces. It belongs in the Filoviridae family of viruses. The Ebola virus is physically transferred via body fluids so vomit, diarrhea, blood, sweat, lymph, semen are all affected. It can remain viable for a certain amount of time (hours, days) while in fluid, less dried, and longer if retained in cold and not exposed to light (UV). Look at triatomine bugs that transmit disease; it's not via the oral route, but by its fecal route. If a bed bug or triatomine bug has fed on a Ebola-stricken patient, the infected blood is in the bug and it's true that the insect doesn't inject or throw up already sucked up blood into a new host. There basically isn't any blood on the stylet fascicle. But if a person (relative, nurse) sees the blood-swollen bug and out of disgust smashes it with a hand or squishes it with a finger, the tainted blood is now on that person and in the surrounding environment (albeit a small area). If you're not wearing personal protective equipment (gloves, minimally), you have now contacted infected bodily fluid. What is the difference if the person bled and a few drops hit the bed, floor, side table or a bed bug was on the bed, floor, side table and was squished?

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  16. buggyinsyracuse

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Oct 20 2014 12:21:00
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    Interesting information, Lou. Thanks.

  17. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Oct 21 2014 7:06:41
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    Six years as a "bedbugger" has helped me recognize the ebola misinformation and fearmongering for what it is:
    - Misunderstandings and misinformation? Check
    - People pushing their pet cause (for BB: it's all because of the environmentalists, for ebola, it's the southern border) as the cure? Check
    - Ostracism of victims or suspected victims? Check

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  18. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Oct 21 2014 12:39:20
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    BigDummy - 3 days ago  » 
    I would imagine if you were in a position to contract ebola from a bed bug you've got greater exposure issues.

    This seems like the best answer.

    The nurse in Lou's scenario doesn't need to smash the bed bug in order to come in contact with her charge's ebola.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  19. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Oct 21 2014 13:16:29
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    Hi,

    As an update I gave a presentation to a regional meeting if infection control professionals today so got the chance to seek their input. The answer being that Ebola risks trump bedbugs.

    David

  20. loubugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Oct 21 2014 14:30:17
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    The nurse in Lou's scenario doesn't need to smash the bed bug in order to come in contact with her charge's ebola.

    Exactly. In this case there is more to worry about since there are obvious ways by which Ebola can be picked up in the normal ways of contacting body fluids. If the nursing staff was with a patient who has not yet shown any signs of Ebola infection. Bed bugs that have fed on the potentially infected person have blood from that person, but is it yet in the infective stage?
    How about - If there are bed bugs in hospital room and these bugs have fed and crawled about and gotten into the bags that are being carried by the nurse or by a family member who is visiting and now taken home. The hospital isn't up on their bed bug infestations, their pest management company hasn't been examining beds or rooms carefully. Visitors aren't seeing small infestations while visiting. Of course, there are many scenarios that are far-fetched, but if it is early on and there are no results back yet from tests from a person suspected of having Ebola exposure because that person is a nurse.
    All this points to proper protective equipment and procedures and not overlooking anything. that may be out of the ordinary.

  21. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 22 2014 7:08:30
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    Hi Lou,

    I also hear you have to wear green to be an expert on Ebola (or at least comment in the media) so that job is out as far as Ia m concerned being a Henry Ford fan.

    David

  22. loubugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 22 2014 7:32:56
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    Yes, Henry said (and I'm sure I'm paraphrasing), you can have any model of car as long as it is a Model-T and any color as long as it's black.

  23. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 22 2014 7:53:33
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    Yes, I was just watching a "false flag" video that shows "green" to be the trendy Ebola colour although the best one was the CNN film showing one of the plane crew interacting with the "infected patient" without wearing any PPE.

    David

  24. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 22 2014 12:18:58
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    The general feeling among medical entomologists is that vectoring of Ebola by bed bugs or mosquitoes for that matter is highly unlikely. However there are some questions about flies and the like in terms of mechanical transmission.


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