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Does heat attract BED BUGS???

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  1. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri May 11 2007 19:24:54
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    Fed up hello.
    This heat thing is based on a few ideas:

    My personal experience: having a hungry, no blood laden adult bed bug drawn to the heat of my laundry sack to the point of it either have attached itself to the bag in the Laundromat (doubtful, not the way I was doing laundry, 2 months ago) or it actually got up and out of it's hiding place (in full daylight) because it was attracted to the heat or by the heat.

    So ... this HEAT SOURCE was I believe the major attractor. It was cold in my place 2 months ago too!

    In the case of the bed bug, HEAT is one of the things it is drawn to. It is (my supposition) similar to the types of instinctual desire that makes trout swim up stream to spawn ... or Geese to know precisely when to start heading south for the winter.

    I have personally caught 8 or 10 nymphs using combo heat CO2 balloons and De traps.
    It is in warmer climates that the bed bug breeds best: 70-90 F.
    Lower than 50 F they tend to stops laying eggs.

    So I'm sort of saying I think heat can sometimes acts like a rejuvenation for the bed bugs (up to a point like 85-90F).

    Frankly fed up I think this has already been proven, but the attraction to heat alone thing ... it is a good question. It seems logical to assume and I have seen and heard anecdotal evidence to support this idea from others too but I was also adviced to use sweat and a balloon filled with my C02 for my partially successful heat traps.
    With no PCO’s--I would have stood on one ear whistling Dixie had I thought it might have helped.

    And case in point I was really only using an exaggerated illustration for Dawn to show her just how easily so many things can happen to make a bed bug leave the bedroom.
    They do tend to follow us however, look at the statistics. The more densely populated and area is the more bed bug activity there is.
    PS I always throw a dirty sock into my heat traps for good measure. But I can't say for sure how many I caught because I was too busy destroying the plastic bag they all were supposedly going into. I know I saw cast skins in the area where the heater was placed, that were not there the night before when I sat the trap up.

    [Perhaps the energy of the heat even had some slight effect on the molting??? (that part is really extra specualtive)]

    One or two of Winston O Buggy's four, suggested reading (blog articles from yesterday) mention that BB’s tend to stop laying eggs at 50 degrees F and that 70--90F is ideal for them.

    Q … If it was 48F and I preferred 70-90 and you put a hot bag of laundry down near me ... I'd try and snuggle up and keep warm. So it is both speculative and party theoretically based and partly best quess assumption.

    What do others have to say about heat and how it kills or doesn't kill ... causes dormancy or less sexual activity in bed Bugs or what have you?

  2. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun May 13 2007 19:52:05
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    More specifically let me ask: Have any people ever noticed any Bed Bugs around heat sources brought into the home, hot laundry bags ... or Heat producing lamps especially at a time when the room itself is/was chilly.
    (As temps raise this will be harder and harder to answer--so if anyone has had that experience and this jogs your memory please post it here.

  3. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun May 13 2007 20:26:25
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    FEEDING ECOLOGY AND DIET

    Adults and larvae hide in the daytime and emerge at night, searching for human blood; they also may feed on poultry, dogs, and bats. They can take a blood meal four to five times as heavy as themselves. Starving individuals survive a long time, more than a year in cold climates, but do not reproduce.

    This is taken from the link below:

    http://www.answers.com/topic/bedbug

    This info had me opening up all the windows in mid February during a real cold spell--and so I did just that. I slept in winter coats--anything that may help irritate the bed bugs natural habitat is a good thing I say. Extremes in cold we can hardly tolerate causes less breeding...

    But there is no "miracle cure" out there yet, so often we have to do what seems feasible but perhaps not proven yet--so long as it is safe. So, besdies besides waiting for the magic pill or "super duper spray." I know I'll do everything I can should I become re-infested.

    With summer upon us ... Placing things in cars in clear plastic sounds more apt to kill a bed bug from heat, so this is like the opposite of what I had done in the cold spell.

    I'm saying every little bit helps--to some small degree, and I get a bit incensed when people point out I'm speculating--well we're all speculating to some degree.

    And here is another speculative thing I've noted ... bed bugs tend to use going up walls as a last resort in order to get to us if they have been cordoned off in some temporary way.
    Whether this is because they don’t climb well or that it just doesn’t occur to them first to do so … could save some one from a few bites.

    What can the hot muggy summer months ahead do for us to make their lives miserable and thus ours too?
    Since I know bed bugs breed like bunnies … if I had an air conditioner … I’d turn it on one day then turn it off the next—that’s just me. They won’t like this constant alteration in their habitat—I don’t think.
    Anyway thank God for pheromones in the fall—if not four months too short of the hell bed bugs will likely put us through this summer.

    It is a shame to say it, but bed bugs avoid humid survices and so yeah, I'm saying if you have a bad infestation or a troublesome one ... you may wind up having to turn off the A/C during the hottest muggiest summer days to stress their biological system. Then turn it on really really high the very next day.
    Those last few bed bugs that tend to hang on are the most tenations one's we especially need to kill, as, they are the most likely bed bugs carrying new and better tolerance and passing it off to thier blood sucking babies.

  4. nightshirt

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon May 14 2007 10:07:10
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    willow - you start a thread, and then answer yourself 3 times in it.

    thats why i love you!!!!!

  5. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Mon May 14 2007 11:27:04
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    so what do you think about the answers and just plain ol' heat?
    ps I love you to!!!

  6. nightshirt

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Tue May 15 2007 12:25:13
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    i would like a factual answer to that one. i thought so too but have no proof that this supposition is true.

  7. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat May 26 2007 20:51:36
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    Only one time did Olli not turn away from light--that was when I held her directly in the sun so that the heat of the sun shown down on her. In fact her face was directly pointed to the sun. She "seemd" not only not to hide from it--she "seemed" to be "enjoying the heat." All other times she turned away fro mthe source of light but light without heat. She's onle one bug, true; but she's still alive and I'll see about another heat experiment right now, to see if I can supplement any of this case study experiemnt:

    I tried to persued her using cold /hot air to turn away from cold areas and walk towards the warmer one's--It did not work at all--6:00 P.M. PST.

    She has four maybe five eggs now BTW everybody!

  8. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 30 2007 21:09:25
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    these eggs are turning yellow

  9. nyjammin

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 30 2007 21:36:18
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    They may be turning ripe and ready for action! Just in time for father's day! Happy Father's Day Willow!

  10. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Wed May 30 2007 21:55:16
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    Oh thanks , they look like little insolated bananas nearly ripe for picking.


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