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Do Metal Bedframes work Better in Preventing infestations?

(15 posts)
  1. Itchybutdealing

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 4:42:24
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    I think I will get rid of all of our lovely wooden frames if that is the case. Thanks for the info guys:)

  2. buggedmama

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 12:05:45
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    Yes, definitely. We discarded our infested bed and wood frame and replaced it with a new metal one, with the legs in apple juice tins with DE inside and double-sided tape around them (but the tape never caught any bugs that I could see), and it never became re-infested. (The entire frame was also dusted with DE). But another thing that really helps, I think, is keeping couches and beds pulled away from the walls. Our living room futon frame is wooden, but has always been a few feet from the nearest wall because in the IKEA catologue the picture showed the couch a few feet in front of the bookshelves we bought and I liked the look of it and set our living room up that way. Our living room futon, despite being wood-framed, did not get infested. That's not to say it couldn't have, even without being up against a wall, but I definitely think bed bugs are more comfortable near walls for some reason.

    I wanted to add that I see no reason to get rid of wood frames that aren't infested... I saw the pics that showed a metal piece of furniture infested (I think they were Lou Sorkin's on Flickr?). So they definitely CAN get infested, I just think it is less likely/more difficult for bbugs to climb the metal frames.

  3. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 12:10:13
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    Pictures do exist of bed bugs harboring in metal structures such as tubing of furniture and in a screw hole in a plastic type of seat(Lou Sorkin). Wood does give more of an opportunity for bugs to hide because of its nature of cracks and crevices but these pests can hang out anywhere even in smoke detectors and in some cases electronics. My point is that unless you really feel you must get rid of your wood furniture I would and I have treated by means of chemical (Bedlam) vacuum and steam and of course with good wood polish and I kept all of my wood. It is harder to manage wood but I became determined not to let the bugs win that battle.

  4. buggyinsocal

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 12:27:32
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    For what it's worth, my bed has a metal bed frame, and it didn't seem to stop the infestation at all. In the interest of full disclosure, however, I should note that my bed is in a corner against two different walls (I"m not sure if I can change that given the size of the bedroom, the dressers, and the bed, which is sort of a bummer). Also I frequently left my suitcase on my bed after travel before I knew the menace that BB could be.

  5. paulaw0919

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Jul 10 2008 12:45:50
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    No matter what type of furniture you have in your home whether it be wood, metal, plastic or otherwise...bed bugs will infest it. Having a plain metal bed frame, furniture that is less elaborate with no grooves, carvings and such will make it easier to spot an infestation much earlier do to much less cracks and crevices in which they hide. I chose not to get a metal frame that had hollow poles and such, for it would be more difficult to spot bed bugs that hide inside the tubing if we were ever to become infested again. Imo, a good cheap metal frame with or without wheels is the way to go as for bed frames.

  6. biteybitey

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jun 3 2010 17:21:23
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    Where can I find the link to the picture of -metal frame with bedbugs?-
    Still looking.....

  7. zerg_infestor

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jun 3 2010 21:22:29
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    didn't stop me from getting an infestation.

  8. bushbugg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jun 3 2010 22:47:10
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    Here is my exception. I had an ikea futon against a wall naturally.
    As you can see from the pic http://www.ikea.com/PIAimages/0109922_PE259729_S4.JPG
    The frame has a lot of comfy wood slats. part of those slats are hidden from light AND near enough to holes in the metal for the bugs to have had a kind of bomb shelter. Because I sprayed the wood every other night for 2 weeks.

  9. diebbsdie

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Jun 3 2010 23:13:31
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    the problem with a simple metal bed frame (wheels or no) is that it's soooo ugly. i want to put a bedskirt on mine, but obviously i don't want to have it be touching the floor, NOR do i want to create more hiding spots for bed bug bitches.

    anyone have any ideas to make a simple, basic metal bed frame look good?

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jun 4 2010 6:43:35
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    Hi,

    Missed this thread the first time around but have a strong opinion to share.

    Bed bugs if left to colonise a local tend to follow patterns as to where they can be found on certain types of furniture. If you compare wooden beds to metal framed beds you find that with metal framed bed they can often be found further away from the bed than with a wooden frame.

    Therefore if you are looking for the idea bed to minimise the potential impact of bed bugs you actually want to go for a wooden frame which is light in colour and seal up all the cracks and screw holes. It should be one that you can easily dismantle and rebuild for cleaning purposes.

    Attempting to rely on metal beds as a form of isolation does not work with bed bugs and yes they will happily live in the tubes themselves in which case they are a lot harder to get rid of, in fact many years ago I wrote this in my bed bug myths section of the site:

    14. Bed bugs don't like metal beds -
    Although it is true that metal beds are less hospitable to bed bugs simply replacing all beds with metal ones will not cure a bed bug problem. In some cases because there are not as many obvious hiding places for bed bugs in metal beds they can make the matter worse.

    hope this makes the situation a little clearer.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.
  11. spideyjg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jun 4 2010 9:49:38
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    bushbugg - 10 hours ago  » 
    Here is my exception. I had an ikea futon against a wall naturally.
    As you can see from the pic http://www.ikea.com/PIAimages/0109922_PE259729_S4.JPG
    The frame has a lot of comfy wood slats. part of those slats are hidden from light AND near enough to holes in the metal for the bugs to have had a kind of bomb shelter. Because I sprayed the wood every other night for 2 weeks.

    We have one of those and it was one of the "ground zeros". I tossed it because it was damaged also.

    Bought another and sealed the frame and all junctions of the underbed box. I used DE in the metal voids, foamed them with sealant, then caulked the openings during assembly. There are a lot of junctions to address.

    The slats cannot be sealed on their ends. Tried and it didn't hold.

    Jim

  12. hoo2677

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri Jun 4 2010 10:40:20
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    I had a murphy bed with a platform when I had my infestation. After three months I realized there was just no way that bed was gonna be treatable even though the pest company assured me it could be. I replaced it with a metal hollow tub futon frame. I put DE in the holes (typically where joins were) in the tubing and wrapped every tiny opening (there were quite few) with duct tape. Legs in dog bowls of murphy's oil.

    It's been a year since my last treatment and no bed bugs. They're gone but the mental scars are still healing. Bed bugs - you suck! Anyway, I digress. My bed's still that way, away from the wall, legs in bowls, mattress cover on and will be probably until the end of summer. That's when I think I'll be ready to really relax.

    So is my bed the sexy little Bedouin tent of a bed it was before bed bugs, nope. But it's temporary in the big picture and knowing they are "gone" gone is way more important to me than aesthetics which used to be really really important to me.

    Bed bugs shift your priorities.

  13. EffeCi

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Jun 5 2010 20:33:17
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    Yeah... BBs don't like metal...

    metal bedframe infested 1
    metal bedframe infested 2
    metal bedframe infested 3

    and they don't like plastic... sure...

    plastic harbourage

  14. bushbugg

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat Jun 5 2010 23:32:46
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    spideyjg - 1 day ago  » 

    We have one of those and it was one of the "ground zeros". I tossed it because it was damaged also.
    Bought another and sealed the frame and all junctions of the underbed box. I used DE in the metal voids, foamed them with sealant, then caulked the openings during assembly. There are a lot of junctions to address.
    The slats cannot be sealed on their ends. Tried and it didn't hold.
    Jim

    Yeah, glad to hear that before I bought another one. I like the design a lot as a bachelor, but there is just no way to seal those slats. I like the idea of a reasonably cheap blonde wood bed that you can isolate and dissasemble. But for right now, an air mattress will do fine.

  15. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jun 6 2010 3:08:35
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    EffeCi,
    I like those pictures you uploaded. Very descriptive indeed.
    Lou

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult in all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology.

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