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Do bed bugs always 'bleed' when you squash them?

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  1. scared-girl

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 16:02:48
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    I had found a live bug and my landlord gave it to an exterminator to ID. It was a bed bug apparently. I wish I took a photo. It was the size of a lady bug but with a really flat body. Thing is, I semi crushed it when I grabbed it in a tissue, and NO blood was released. Do they always 'bleed' or was it just starving?

    I haven't seen anything else yet (8 days later). I am wondering if it was indeed a BB, and maybe displaying starving behavior (as it came out a 7:00 am to a fully lit room). Would that be a good sign of just being a random bug -- as I've had no bites or physical signs?

    Thoughts?

  2. BedBugPanic

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 19:12:53
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    I could be wrong, since I'm not a pro, but a bed bug would only "bleed" when squished if they are full of blood from a recent meal.

  3. Jenn28

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 21:03:21
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    BedBugPanic is right, they'll only bleed after a blood meal. Because they are so flat before a meal, they are impossible to squish in a tissue when you catch them and are trying to kill them! Buggers!!!

  4. scared-girl

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Nov 28 2010 21:05:26
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    Well... at least I wasn't his meal. Phew! Die, dirty bugger, die!!!

  5. Louise

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 11:44:10
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    Jenn28 - 14 hours ago  » 
    BedBugPanic is right, they'll only bleed after a blood meal. Because they are so flat before a meal, they are impossible to squish in a tissue when you catch them and are trying to kill them! Buggers!!!

    Seriously? They can't be "squished" when they're flat? Does that mean that putting 130 pounds of weight on a paperback library book won't ensure that any bed bugs that *may* be inside are killed?

    I'm going to need a new plan...

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 11:58:59
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    Hi,

    Just a comment to say if you find a bug its always best to put it into a dry glass or jar so that it can be identified while intact.

    Its much easier to identify an intact sample than to hope to recognise a smushed anything.

    Most people doing insect id work will always get the intact cases off their desks before the more complex and time consuming ones.

    With regards the presence of blood when squashed that does rather depend upon the time since last feed. In the first few days following feeding yes you will get a detectable amout of blood but this darkens to a tar like colour. After a week or so there may be little or nothing in the digestive / explusion tract and therefore you may not get a distinguishable blood trace. The thinner the bedbug the less likley you are to see blood.

    Its also fair to say the thinner the bedbug the harder to kill. I had a few shots of a front half of a bedbug that made it quite a way before expiring. I dont think pressure is a viable option.

    Hope that helps.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.
  7. Jenn28

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 12:24:02
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    Louise,

    I am not saying it's impossible to kill them, but when you squish a bug you expect it to die just like that! When you squish something that is already as flat as paper, it can take a bit of a minor beating to kill it

  8. Jacksfullofaces

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 12:57:39
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    There is no doubt cimex are amazing at surviving almost everything. A few months ago my husband splattered one when he rolled on it and he said to the deceased bug "serves you right for being a glutton and hanging around to gloat" lol
    Jacks

  9. loubugs

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 14:45:44
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    Yes, it bleeds if its recent meal is inside its gut. The more digested, the less blood there is to squish out. You'd be more apt to kill it if you squish the head end rather than the rear end.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult in all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology.
  10. spideyjg

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Nov 29 2010 15:08:56
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    loubugs - 20 minutes ago  » 
    Yes, it bleeds if its recent meal is inside its gut. The more digested, the less blood there is to squish out. You'd be more apt to kill it if you squish the head end rather than the rear end.

    While true for mortality sake if the insect is yet to be identified, smash the rear. Far more key identifiers, IMHO, are on the head and thorax than the abdomen.

    Jim


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