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Do bb's drop from the ceiling?

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  1. mjmloot

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 18:39:41
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    If i can stop them from getting up my bed wijll they resort to climbing the walls and jumping down on me?

  2. cilecto

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 19:36:51
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    Supposedly, they can do this (do not recall which ento documented this). Part of the advantage of an interceptor like Climb Ups is that they get trapped trying to get up your bed the "conventional" way and can't re-attempt via the ceiling.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  3. cacutie

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 20:19:55
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    Being the not so proud owner of bbs and a popcorn cieling, I have found a couple of them on the cieling. RQ talked me out of spraying the hell out of my cieling with some over the counter chemicals, but I seriously considered it. I've squished those I did find (weeks ago) and have yet to see new ones on my cieling, but I now look with a flashlight every morning and every night before bed. I'm pretty anal about it.

  4. Once Bitten

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Oct 10 2010 23:51:38
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    Well, I guess this is as good a place and time as any to say hello. Hello fellow survivors.

    I will affirm and testify to these bastards climbing walls and ceiling and dropping onto the bed. Just last night was the worst we'd seen on our third floor bedroom and office. Bought a new steamer (Wagoner 905 on-demand) yesterday afternoon, tore down the bed (mattress in zippered cover, split box springs on steel rails with cast aluminum tubular bed frame) and treated carpet, bed frame, crack and crevice around most of room and around wall corners between office and bedroom - we have slanted ceiling and dormer - in this 1916 home. We actually saw them crawling up the wall and ceiling heading over toward us in the area we were cleaning. My better half has had them drop from the ceiling while sitting at the computer and has seen them crawl from behind window trim and head up to ceiling. The bugs can't jump or fly but the can move quickly when on the hunt. So discouraging to find a couple of adults and a couple little spec sized ones in bedding today (the mattress and box springs are 1 year old - replaced after first detection of full infestation of old bed - mattress has been in bug proof zippered case since purchase - the split box springs were left in original plastic - replaced with vinyl zippered covers today as we noticed a couple of tears in the plastic).

    History:
    We've been fighting them in our single family home here in Cincinnati for two years with little success. We've contact PCOs and have gotten estimates from $700 and up to treat our home. The POCs here now aren't giving more than 30 days warranty on treatment. They'll treat two consecutive weeks and a third "if necessary". IF? Are they !#@$%ing kidding? Also got an estimate for ThermaPure heat treatment $6K+ for this house (basement plus three floors of living space). Um, not an option. So we've been been buying from the pest supply store and have been treating (crack and crevice with full vacuum, bedding change every 1 to 3 days as necessary) every 1-2 weeks just keep them abated enough for us to continue living in our home. We thought we just about had them licked until this spring and they came back in a big way. We switched products about 9 months ago because the things had obviously become resistent to the previous product and even antagonistic against its use - they came out and bit worse the 2 weeks we treated before switching products. And we switched products again just about 2 months ago because of the same reason. Fact is the bedbugs are mostly resistent to most products available today. Other than thermal treatments people are just living with the bugs and managing as good as they can, or trashing all their stuff and moving. Not an option, we own this house and can't afford to rent somewhere else and make the house payment. Don't know what to do - I'm allergic to the bites (clustered bites will swell together to the point I have 2-3 inch splotchy welts on arms and legs). I haven't slept without benedryl in 18 months and alternate antibiotic ointment, hydrocortisone and benedryl cream on bitten areas of my body throughout whole day.

    Sorry bout the long post. First time I've posted about our experience anywhere. I'm so tired. So tired of being sick and tired. Went back to store today and purchased "Rest Easy". Treated are around bed, bed frame and carpet around bed. Who know maybe it keep them at bay long enough to get some sleep tonight. At least it smells good.

  5. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 0:27:49
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    They climb the walls and go to the ceiling to avoid chemicals you may have put along the baseboard. They don't have sticky pads on their "feet" like other bugs do and they simply can't keep a good grip at times and sometimes fall off.

    I have said this before ... they are bugs, NOT NAVY SEALS, ......bugs.

    There is no (ZERO) evidence to suggest they are smart enough to climb and drop onto you like most claim. ("Dive Bomb") .... Don't give these vampires so much credit .. they will think they're superior to us.

  6. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 2:34:07
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    Hi KQ,

    This is one of those we will have to agree to disagree on.

    I have seen a number of people isolate beds only to actually see bedbugs crawl across the ceiling and drop down from above. This is an ancient behavioural pattern for most species of blood sucking insects that lived in caves. They have the ability to sense their source of food by the CO2 plume they exhale and once located drop down.

    Yes it can be a defence mechanism to avoid insecticide applied to the lower wall area but it can also be seen in cases where the bed is isolated with tape or devices.

    It is however not their normal behavioural pattern and I have only see they behave this way when the bed is isolated which is why I have never been a fan of this approach to treatment.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

  7. EffeCi

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 5:32:45
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    There is no (ZERO) evidence to suggest they are smart enough to climb and drop onto you like most claim.

    I agree with you, KQ, but...

    BBs primarily follow heat and CO2 gradients to reach their host.
    What's the hottest zone in a room? The ceiling.
    It's easy to imagine that, if it's impossible to reach the host, BBs tend to go to the next hottest point.
    What's the most interesting zone in a ceiling? The one right above the sleeping host, because it's the top of a column of hot hair and CO2 generated by the host itself.
    So we have a BB head over heels, badly clung to the ceiling, right above the host's bed.
    Sooner or later, it will fall (or even drop) down...

  8. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 7:21:49
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    Above last 3 answers all seem good to me. The reason they fall from the ceiling could be that they don't have a good grip on it, but their behavior of climbing up gets them up the wall and onto the ceiling due to the cues that normally attract them to a potential host. Although CO2 is a gas that is heavy and would not necessarily be forming a column above the host, but form below and along the ground. It may just be the natural climbing instinct and loss of footing due to gravity, so it appears that they jump off on purpose. I suppose you would have to station a person in a room on a bed that is pulled from close proximity to the wall and release bed bugs along the perimeter of the room to see if there was more of a concentration of bugs above the bed as the hours progressed. Would also have to do something along the floor to keep them from travelling horizontally. Heat as an attractant is not a cue that works from a great distance, but is sensed close to the host, probably within a 10 inches or less. There were some studies that demonstrated this. However bed bugs will congregate in warmer areas of the house rather than colder areas and there are reports that groups will be found around the heating pipes and radiators during colder months of the year. Food for thought.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult in all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology.
  9. Once Bitten

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 7:56:21
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    Hi KillerQueen,

    Wow, thanks for the warm welcome.

    Look, I didn't spend time just writing my previous post just so I could post something. I answered the OPs original question with my experience - earned in blood. It seemed an open question to anyone - not just PCOs - so I "shared".

    I have low ceilings in the rooms in which I referenced. My spouse and I have observed this behavior fairly consistently over the last two years. If the things are hungry, the things will follow the food. Even you called the bugs vampires. Sticky pads on feet or no the things have enough staying power to climb great heights considering size. They can climb just fine on non-slick surfaces and will move toward food. Not attributing any kind of intelligence to the bugs at all, the things are bugs - operating on pure instinct.

  10. loubugs

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 9:31:41
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    Don't forget that what you think is a slick surface or smooth surface might not be according to the bed bug and its tarsal claws. True, there are no sticky pads, but they are able to grip certain surfaces anyway.

  11. WGarrow

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 12:53:04
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    I am virtually certain this very occasionally happens just by chance if a house has a major infestation. They probably lose their grip once in a while and sometimes are over the bed when this happens. Someone sees this and the story takes on a life of its own and people believe these critters are purposely dive bombing onto beds when they can't make it other ways.

    If they really do this on purpose, I would nominate bed bugs as the smartest nonhuman creature in existence. I don't think so.

  12. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 12:58:20
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    Once Bitten,

    First, Sorry you are here .. but welcome. I was not responding to anything you wrote, in fact, I didn't even read what you wrote until now. My comments were simply based from the threads topic.

  13. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Oct 11 2010 21:22:50
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    Follow up with the Pro's:

    I get that heat rises and some bugs will move to the ceiling (bed bugs included) to stay warm or search for a host, like a bed bug. I also understand they may pickup carbon dioxide rising from the bed.

    What i'm getting at is this ... You're telling me the bug knows it needs to walk up the wall, across ceiling, and then it strategically knows it needs to release its grip to fall onto the host? I find this hard to believe and would like for you to point to any study that proves the bug knows it needs to do this to reach the host.

    Again, I'm not talking about random searching or even target searching while walking across any surface. I'm talking about the bugs intelligence to know it needs to do this and dive bomb in order to get to the host.

  14. EffeCi

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue Oct 12 2010 1:46:47
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    You're telling me the bug knows it needs to walk up the wall, across ceiling, and then it strategically knows it needs to release its grip to fall onto the host?

    No. It's only a result of its istinctive behaviours.

  15. lostandconfused

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Dec 3 2010 16:47:26
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    I would get a mosquito net. I think this is the easiest way to ensure against this.

  16. rangichangi

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Dec 3 2010 19:12:18
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    lostandconfused - 2 hours ago  » 
    I would get a mosquito net. I think this is the easiest way to ensure against this.

    A regular mosquito net will not be effective against bbs at all stages, especially nymphs - the holes are too big and they can also crawl in beneath the net. I rave about the Travel Tent from a company called Long Road and wonder why it is not more popular. It may be a bit pricey and it's a production when you have to go to the bathroom at 2 AM but since it allows me to sleep I think it is worth its weight in gold. When used correctly the bbs(even 1st stage nymphs) cannot penetrate the netting and they cannot bite through the nylon floor. We have it on top of our futon mattress, which is encased. If there are any bbs inside the tent they are very easy to isolate and kill - I inspect all seams and corners with a flashlight before we go to sleep.

  17. BBcoukHome

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Fri Dec 3 2010 20:55:41
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    EffeCi - 1 month ago  » 

    You're telling me the bug knows it needs to walk up the wall, across ceiling, and then it strategically knows it needs to release its grip to fall onto the host?

    No. It's only a result of its istinctive behaviours.

    It instinctively knows that when it senses those certain conditions a potential source of food is below and by releasing they will be closer to food. I am not sure if it is instinctive or a hard wired genetic instinct and survival strategy for cave dwelling blood feeders.

    I can only comment on what I have seen and observed.

    On a number of occasions and under certain circumstances bedbugs will seek refugia away for the central bed area. They will often return to these locations time after time and have on a number of occasions been well feed even in rooms that where isolated. To settle this debate I actually stayed in such an environment and observed bedbugs moving across the ceiling and falling down to the bed which I was in.

    Thankfully I only tend to see this when:

    • All close refugia are occupied - heavy infestations
    • Extensive use of isolation strategies in a local source infestation
    • Extensive use of aerosol or fogger insecticides

    But regardless of stimuli or reasoning they are capable of repeatedly bypassing normal ground level isolation by navigating the ceiling.

    When you get a real bad place and they are hungry they will even follow you around the house, again only seen in the real bad ones.

    David

  18. scaredsilly

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Dec 4 2010 10:01:13
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    Scary!

  19. BB-B-gon

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Dec 13 2010 15:14:46
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    This would seem to call for: Isolate the bed, isolate the ceiling. On ceiling, two rows of double sticky duct tape outside perimeter of bed -- outside one packed with DE, inside one sticky. If they drop, at least they have gone across the DE.

  20. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Dec 13 2010 17:03:05
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    BB-B-gon - 1 hour ago  » 
    This would seem to call for: Isolate the bed, isolate the ceiling. On ceiling, two rows of double sticky duct tape outside perimeter of bed -- outside one packed with DE, inside one sticky. If they drop, at least they have gone across the DE.

    I prefer to think of it as another reason why isolation is not the answer because it is so difficult and needs to take into account the specifics of the location.

    Solutions need to be simple and easy to implement.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Open minds find faster solutions"

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  21. KillerQueen

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Dec 13 2010 17:15:50
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    bed-bugscouk - 9 minutes ago  » 

    BB-B-gon - 1 hour ago  » 
    This would seem to call for: Isolate the bed, isolate the ceiling. On ceiling, two rows of double sticky duct tape outside perimeter of bed -- outside one packed with DE, inside one sticky. If they drop, at least they have gone across the DE.

    I prefer to think of it as another reason why isolation is not the answer because it is so difficult and needs to take into account the specifics of the location.
    Solutions need to be simple and easy to implement.
    David

    Simple .... Screw the bed frame into the ceiling, get a used seat belt off ebay to strap yourself in, and chemically treat the floor. Just something I might try if I was infested > ; 0

  22. parakeets

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Dec 13 2010 17:16:09
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    I also had bed bugs crawl up the wall and drop onto my bed but this was after they fed, so it didn't seem to be a caclulated effort to get a meal in my case. Bed bugs were living in the wall space over the light fixture above the center of my bed. The bed bugs would feed on me and get very heavy and tear-drop shaped. Then they would climb the walls and waddle back to their harborage right above my bed. Some would fall back onto the bed from the ceiling, maybe due to the sheer weight of the blood meal they were carrying.

  23. KillerQueen

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Dec 13 2010 17:18:34
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    parakeets - 1 minute ago  » 
    I also had bed bugs crawl up the wall and drop onto my bed but this was after they fed, so it didn't seem to be a caclulated effort to get a meal in my case. Bed bugs were living in the wall space over the light fixture above the center of my bed. The bed bugs would feed on me and get very heavy and tear-drop shaped. Then they would climb the walls and waddle back to their harborage right above my bed. Some would fall back onto the bed from the ceiling, maybe due to the sheer weight of the blood meal they were carrying.

    Thats what I call a Navy Seal with no traction.

  24. bed-bugscouk

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    Mon Dec 13 2010 17:38:02
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    KillerQueen - 21 minutes ago  » 
    Simple .... Screw the bed frame into the ceiling, get a used seat belt off ebay to strap yourself in, and chemically treat the floor. Just something I might try if I was infested > ; 0

    I will cite this next time you question my sanity.

    David

  25. KillerQueen

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 15 2010 20:30:54
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    bed-bugscouk - 2 days ago  » 

    KillerQueen - 21 minutes ago  » 
    Simple .... Screw the bed frame into the ceiling, get a used seat belt off ebay to strap yourself in, and chemically treat the floor. Just something I might try if I was infested > ; 0

    I will cite this next time you question my sanity.
    David

    lol ... I just need a little more sleep and I'll be fine =0

  26. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Dec 15 2010 21:34:16
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    EffeCi - 2 months ago  » 

    You're telling me the bug knows it needs to walk up the wall, across ceiling, and then it strategically knows it needs to release its grip to fall onto the host?

    No. It's only a result of its instinctive behaviours.

    Would seem to me that, if verified to in fact be occurring, it *could* actually be a complex instinctive behavior evolved over the millions of years, selected for in caves, etc. because it helps get the bugs a meal. They wouldn't have to "know why" they do it, they wouldn't have to be "planning strategy". It's just that bugs that do it feed somewhat more and therefore get to reproduce somewhat more until the behavior is well established among a high percentage of individuals in the population – a common evolutionary story.

    Two comparisons from among many possible ones: bees aren't engineers and don't "think" but create beautiful honeycombs; spiders create beautiful webs; both are behaviors far more complex than what we're thinking the bugs may be doing.

  27. ohgawdmyarms

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 8 2011 7:12:47
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    yeah ive seen many on the ceiling ive never seen them drop though they are killed as soon as they are seen, my method is a tad over kill but there ya go, i have a flat ceiling though no way for them to hide up there so i dont know what is causing them to want to go up there

  28. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Oct 8 2011 11:13:25
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    ohgawdmyarms - 3 hours ago  » 
    ........ so i dont know what is causing them to want to go up there

    Its most common for my team to find bedbugs on ceilings in cases where aerosol or fogger based products have been used.

    I have also seen them there when they have been traveling through buildings.

    Hope that helps explain.

    David

  29. BugsMustDie

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    Sat Oct 8 2011 11:24:45
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    After reading most of these responses I realize this is a pretty old post, but I appreciate it was brought back up since I was just wondering about this the other night. I appreciate that the experts have chimed in and now I would like to give my non-expert 2 cents.

    I love that Loubugs brought science into the mix. While we have a pretty good idea about bed bug behavior, I think we must agree it's impossible to understand 100% why bed bugs behave the way they do. I agree they are not Navy Seals, they are not capable of complex thinking and their behaviors are driven by instinct, something that has evolved over many years. Just like the behaviors of spiders and bees, as mentioned above.

    I am not an expert on bed bugs. My knowledge is what I have learned from reading the forums and other reputable online sources. I am not a scientist either. But I am a fan of it and have immersed myself in atmospheric studies. Science is something we can test and make positive conclusions about. As lou stated, carbon dioxide is much more dense than nitrogen and oxygen, the two top gasses that make up the atmosphere. So it does not form in columns above our bed, but it does sink to the ground, which can reasonably explain how they are able to find our beds in the first place. Since most ceilings are at least 7 or 8 feet tall and experts report bed bugs can only sense carbon dioxide from about a distance of 5 feet, it makes more sense to me that they pick up on the carbon dioxide that is pushed to the floor than climbing up the walls and onto the ceiling.

    That's all I can positively conclude based on my limited knowledge of bed bug behavior and science. Perhaps David is right. A bed bug that is trapped by an isolated bed could give off an alarm to others so they know to look elsewhere. Or maybe Killer is right, they just fall off the ceiling and get lucky...who knows.

    While those with different opinions will continue to argue, I love that this exchange of communication is taking place. While we are still learning, this is the kind of stuff that gets us closer to winning the battle.

  30. Koebner

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Oct 11 2011 14:32:13
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    When first exhaled, the CO2 in human breath is part of a warm gas mix so there is a certain rise above the source. Think of it less as forming a plume & more as a mound. Happily, our homes are well-enough ventilated that we don't suffocate ourselves in our sleep - where exhaled gases go can be a particular risk in some kinds of caves.

  31. Bedbug_Undertaker

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    Tue Oct 11 2011 16:17:30
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    Now this would be an interesting experiment, not that I enjoy getting bitten to buggery but it could give us answers.

  32. AshamedandScratching

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    Tue Oct 11 2011 16:21:10
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    I love the tags on this thread.

    "Pvt FC Bloodsucker reporting for duty, sir!"

  33. bed-bugscouk

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    Ok, I think I have a facility to test this in I just need time and some UV reactive paint to track the bedbugs that we release.

    It will take a few weeks to set up and run replicates but it will be a natural setting.

    David

  34. Nobugsonme

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    Tue Oct 11 2011 22:32:31
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    rangichangi - 10 months ago  » 

    lostandconfused - 2 hours ago  » 
    I would get a mosquito net. I think this is the easiest way to ensure against this.

    A regular mosquito net will not be effective against bbs at all stages, especially nymphs - the holes are too big and they can also crawl in beneath the net. I rave about the Travel Tent from a company called Long Road and wonder why it is not more popular.

    I don't see how a mosquito net would be of any use at all. They can all walk under it and climb right up to feed on you.

    As for the Travel Tent, those who've reported using it here did not report success for long.
    My sense was they somehow got bed bugs in the tent. Not hard to do.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  35. Bedbug_Undertaker

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    Wed Oct 12 2011 14:10:30
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    bed-bugscouk - 21 hours ago  » 
    Ok, I think I have a facility to test this in I just need time and some UV reactive paint to track the bedbugs that we release.
    It will take a few weeks to set up and run replicates but it will be a natural setting.
    David

    It may be a couple of weeks away before we can test this as I am starting a fresh round of hosting after the weekend it could be one night it could be more, but if we have the facility then I'm happy to act as the guinea pig on this one.

  36. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sun Oct 23 2011 20:00:59
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    This will be an interesting experiment...hosting sounds so civilized....like one sends out a dinner invitation to the BBs...hello, I'm hosting tonight...please come between 2-5 am and bring a hostess gift...no RSVP required

    My way of bumping this...hope that's ok

    They
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  37. laststrawsue

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    Thanks for bumping, this is indeed a fascinating thread.

    Just wanted to say I've watched tons of documentaries about creatures big & small. And my conclusion is that there's many different types of intelligence, and whatever the size of the brain, a creature will use that brain as efficiently & to it's full potential if it's survival depends upon that. And that the drive to survive will motivate all forms of life to push the limits of their abilities, generation after generation.
    I don't think a bed bug or an octopus will be contemplating philosophy or calculating gravitational 3-body problems in the next 20 million generations... but I wonder if that's only because they won't need to do that to survive.

    I think of this, and of course it's anecdotal...

    But we've been infested for perhaps 3 months.
    But we've never found any harborages or signs of them.
    And the only 2 bugs we ever found, were found after not having been at home for 3 days/nights straight. They came out when we got home, but didn't go immediately to sleep... so I think because they were hungry, they were willing to risk coming out in the open while we were awake and moving about... because they just couldn't wait any longer.
    Otherwise, I've only ever been bitten when they come out, unseen, when we're asleep.

    I don't think the bed bugs are consciously thinking - well, we can just wait until they're asleep and then feed, so we don't have to go out & get them now. They're not thinking that or anything at all. They just know when they're hungry.

    I think they just naturally will feed on sleeping humans as often as a sleeping human is available... and if that's nightly, the bed bugs never get really hungry.
    Once we were gone for 3 nights straight, they reached the limit of their hunger, and were willing to come after us while awake, as soon as they sensed our availability.

    Once you think of it that way, there's really no mystery intelligence needed to explain why they'll crawl up a ceiling when the floor is full of pesticide or they can't get to the sleeping people in the bed any other way.
    They're just adapting as best they can to whatever situation they're in, in order to survive. Just as all living creatures do... or perish.

  38. Rich

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Sat Nov 26 2011 15:21:54
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    The bedbugs evolved in caves. So analyze caves to figure them out. The bedbugs use two sensors to find humans: chemical receptors to detect carbon dioxide gas, and infrared sensors to detect relative heat, just like the cops use in helicopters to find hiding human suspects in wooded areas. Humans look white relative to the relatively cooler surrounding materials (bedding, walls, furniture). Recall that human skin is 98.6 degrees ALL THE TIME, even when at rest. Bedding, etc. is probably under 80 degrees even in summer without air conditioning. This temperature difference is substantial considering the fine tuning of the bedbugs infrared receptors. So to make a long story short, the bugs climb on the ceiling in order to get on the bed to suck blood from humans, and of course they can "see" the humans and of course they drop directly down to where the human skin is visible using the infrared sensors. If you don't believe me, read some entomological journal articles. There are scientists studying these bugs, and the scientists are smart, like the scientists who developed hydrogen bombs and the scientists who put man on the moon. If you don't believe in science, don't ever go to doctors or hospitals, as they use science in a big way. The facts of bedbugs are not all known, but their sensor suite is somewhat understood and we know they use CO2 chemoreceptors and infrared sensors at least. There will be more discoveries. If you want info on infrared sensors, check out Youtube video of helicopters or drones using infrared sensors and notice how tires on cars, exhaust pipes on vehicles, or human beings are "white" compared to the surrounding cooler materials. This stuff is not rocket science, but it is science, and science is just as real as the bedbugs. Heat is the only definitive way to kill bedbugs without using illegal, third-world chemicals like Tres Pastitos ("three tiny steps" or aldicarb). The caves never got hot where the bedbugs developed. Use a HS175KT Kerosene Forced Air Heater ($400) to heat up a house to kill the bugs, or to heat up a moving van to kill the bugs in your bed, furniture, and belongings. If you really hate the bugs, study them. Get some entomology textbooks. Consider getting a Ph. D. in entomology, and write your doctoral dissertation on the bedbug. It can be done. Become an expert on "the enemy." Only then will you know and understand its weakness (temperature extremes) and how to exploit it (with construction heaters like the HS175KT Kerosene Forced Air Heater).

  39. KillerQueen

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    Sat Nov 26 2011 20:46:18
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    Since all I use is chemical (with some of the best results in the industry if I may say so myself) you lost me at "Heat is the only definitive way to kill bedbugs without using illegal, third-world chemicals like Tres Pastitos ("three tiny steps" or aldicarb)."

  40. bedbugsuptown

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    Sat Nov 26 2011 22:39:38
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    Yo Richy, welcome to the boards......got bugs?

  41. loubugs

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    Sun Nov 27 2011 8:26:11
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    "Don't forget that what you think is a slick surface or smooth surface might not be according to the bed bug and its tarsal claws. True, there are no sticky pads, but they are able to grip certain surfaces anyway."
    Just an update to what I had posted some time ago. There are pads on the distal edge of the bug's tibiae (segment before its feet -tarsi) upon which they use to climb relatively slick surfaces. Look at some examples in 2 of my videos:

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Plugins
    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Plugins

    Paul Bello sent me a video of a bed bug also crawling on glass that he wanted me to post:

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Plugins

  42. Rosae

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    Sun Nov 27 2011 18:17:48
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    Once on the bed, will they try to jump to the floor when they are full?

    I've see twice that a bed bug jumped out of my sleeve seemingly to reach the kitchen counter or a closet that I opened. Or maybe that was coincidence and they just felt that I stood still and tried to escape from my cloths. If they had escaped by climbing down to my shoes I hadn't noticed them.

  43. loubugs

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    Mon Nov 28 2011 16:42:53
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    The bugs do lose their footing and just fall. Because of gravity they fall down to a lower lever from the starting point. They don't think that they will fall and worry about it and hesitate. If they crawl on a ceiling, they may also just fall off, maybe lose their footing, but sometimes they speed up their pace and lose their footing, too. They could be attracted to something and if it happens to be below them if on the ceiling, they may lose their footing in the crawling process since holding onto a ceiling surface would normally be difficult. If they fall on the potential host, so much the better for them. Bed bugs falling from walls or ceilings is not something that kills them, so this behavior has been with them for millions of years. Plump, fed ones could be damaged, but the crawling behavior on vertical and horizontal surfaces is not something that negatively impacts the species; for the most part, it is beneficial.

  44. bedbugsuptown

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu Dec 1 2011 0:05:37
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    Man alive. This thread 'll likely have the shelf-life of a bedbug.

    WARNING: This site may become addictive to those with bugs on their minds. Do not post @ the hour of sleep.

    Rarely do I pay attention to warnings; unless they are bb related. It's funny though. I always post @ the hour of sleep. Just for the record--I have no opinions nor factual information re: bbs/what they do on the ceiling. Good nite.

  45. jrbtnyc

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    Thu Dec 1 2011 0:28:49
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    loubugs - 2 days ago  » 
    The bugs do lose their footing and just fall. Because of gravity they fall down to a lower lever from the starting point. They don't think that they will fall and worry about it and hesitate. If they crawl on a ceiling, they may also just fall off, maybe lose their footing, but sometimes they speed up their pace and lose their footing, too. ...

    Lou sometime when you get to it, could you test whether bed bugs of all stages fall off cheap generic smooth clear non-sticky single-sided tape that they encounter as a ceiling, i.e. at an angle of 180 degrees, due to gravity because they can't get a grip.

    If you like, since you're in NYC and I'm in NYC, I'll give you an experimental setup pre-fabricated so, if you agree the setup comprises a valid test, then all you have to do is put in the bb's. I'm willing to give the same to KQ who is also in NYC, and ship to David and any others who would like to try it as well.

    According to my own small-scale informal experimentation earlier this year when I had temporary access to a few dozen bb's, some later instars and adults can climb such tape, usually not quickly but sooner or later they can climb it, when it's vertical i.e. at an angle of 90 degrees. However none can negotiate it, I found, when it's a ceiling i.e. at an angle of 180 degrees. Does that comport with your experience/experimentation, and/or are you willing to try my proposed investigation.

    Since folks in this thread are specifically asking the question about bugs on the ceiling, it seems like a good place to give them an answer if it turns out we have a definitive one.

    Because if it's confirmed bb's can't crawl on a smooth-clear-taped ceiling, it means *anyone will always* be able to remove any worry about bugs dropping down on them from the ceiling by placing such tape along the edges of the ceiling – not along the tops of the walls i.e. at a 90-degree angle but along the edge of the ceiling itself i.e. at a 180-degree angle. Of course they'll also need to make sure to block any holes in the ceiling, and duct-tape any light fixtures etc. so no bugs can come out of those to drop down; and they'll need to move their bed, couch, table, chairs and etc. at least a small distance away from the wall; but those are not difficult things to do.

    If someone has a popcorn ceiling where bugs are hiding, after placement of tape along the edges of the ceiling any bugs still hiding in the ceiling will still be able to drop down of course, but subsequently they'll be unable to return so the ceiling will self-purge, permanently.

    If confirmed this actually does work and will always work, and if David and KQ and others repeat the experiment and confirm the result so they can sign off on this too, and begin to utilize it in their field work as an accepted practice, it will mean any worry about bugs dropping from the ceiling is a *problem we will have solved once and for all*. It will mean in the future we will be able to tell anyone who asks about this: here's how to *end* the concern. There will no longer be any mystery about it. Jeff White can do one of his BBCTV pieces on it. We will have made clear progress and will have beaten the bugs for good in this important area.

    Is this something you would consider putting on the front burner and let's see how it turns out. I can't do it myself because I no longer have any access to bb's.

    The experimental setup I'll provide is similar to what's shown in the following YouTube piece (brazen pirated music track so I suggest you turn off the sound)...

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Plugins

    ...except that it will use clear non-sticky tape as its "ceiling" instead of the smooth plastic surface.

  46. ShelaghDB

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu May 3 2012 20:41:38
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    Bumping this for it is a very interesting thread!!!

  47. edtt

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Thu May 3 2012 22:13:42
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    Can somebody tell me about thelast video.....
    The speed has been increased, yes?
    They don't move that fast, do they?

  48. KillerQueen

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    Thu May 3 2012 23:23:38
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    edtt - 1 hour ago  » 
    Can somebody tell me about thelast video.....
    The speed has been increased, yes?
    They don't move that fast, do they?

    They sure can .. I have a few here in this video below. Look at the speed on these suckers.

    "Not for the weak"

    [+] Embed the videoGet the Video Plugins

  49. edtt

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri May 4 2012 0:34:15
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    Wow! I read somewhere that they were slow!
    They r speedy little buggers!!
    Thx KQ, shedding light on the situation, again

  50. KillerQueen

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri May 4 2012 0:43:59
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    No problem .... "Pvt FC Bloodsucker reporting for duty, sir!" lol.... I just read that.

  51. ShelaghDB

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri May 4 2012 0:46:37
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    thats not typical though is it?

    I had an infestation 5 years ago and in the 3 weeks from when I first saw one until it was over and I now realize they were starving and acting erratically by coming out at all hours of the day and actually followed me around my apartment one day, I swear there where

    but they never moved like i saw in this clips
    much slower ..................

  52. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Fri May 4 2012 6:14:07
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    Hi,

    Recently fed bedbugs move a lot faster than a bedbug would usually move.

    This is most likely to be due to the fact that they have gone from being a room temperature to human body temperature and need to quickly return to the room temperature again.

    People focus on speed of movement but in reality it is an irrelevant factoid in infestation circumstances.

    David


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