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bugs and medications

(9 posts)
  1. SmrtBB

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Sun Sep 25 2011 20:00:32
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    Hello,

    I was wondering if anyone has done any studies on BB's and whether or not they are affected by medications people take. The reason I ask is because there was a very sluggish one moving very slowly like it was drunk and I know the person who is getting bitten takes various medications.

    It'd be interesting to find out anyway.

  2. bait

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Sep 26 2011 21:08:55
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    I have every reason to believe that you're on to something.

    I would recommend you read up on the surprise affect ivermectin had on mosquitoes that bit Africans who were treated for river blindness. http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20110711/ZNYT04/107113012

    It's just a matter of time, chance, and someone (a doctor or researcher) willing to "go there".

    Bait

  3. SmrtBB

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Sep 26 2011 21:35:35
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    That is a good article. Although it has been proven that diseases are transmitted between humans and mosquitoes, it hasn't been for humans and bed bugs. I have my thoughts but I don't even know where one would start and how it would be tested.

  4. shmikler

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Sep 26 2011 22:31:49
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    I've thought about that a lot... because with all the medications out there, you'd think something out there wouldn't agree with them while it is passing through the bloodstream.

  5. NoRestForTheWicked

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Mon Sep 26 2011 23:52:32
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    I love this theory. And for the record, I would definitely be a willing test subject for ANYTHING that might be a miracle kill-pill for these little creeps.

    I wish someone WOULD come up with something. I'd be way more willing to be bait if I knew my blood was super-toxic to BBs. Sounds more effective than just laying there and getting bitten, all the while hoping that they get woozy after traipsing over the poison line.

  6. Rosae

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Sep 27 2011 5:44:30
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    The pesticide Phantom is known to make insects slow. This is a good sign.
    But also DE kills them slowly.

  7. SmrtBB

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Sep 27 2011 22:58:23
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    lol @norest.

    I've thought about that too. I wouldn't mind being bitten if I knew I'd kill them. I don't react that badly anyway.

  8. jrbtnyc

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Sep 27 2011 23:25:18
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    Not based on any expert knowledge, and not saying don't do research on this, but I for one have to admit I don't feel this approach will turn out to be promising.

    If via human blood we deliver some substance to bed bugs that is deleterious to them, some bugs may die but we're going to run into the same issues of resistance that we do by administering chemicals around the bugs' environment. As biological entities and products of sexual reproduction, individual bugs have great differences including in their biochemistry, with a few bugs being far from the norm in many different categories, so occasional bugs will survive even something that kills most bugs, and thus will become the new ancestors passing along that non-susceptibility to subsequent generations.

    This effect, which enables bugs to become resistant to conventional pesticides, might be quite enhanced when the delivery mode is in the bugs' food, it seems to me. When a bug feeds, all that blood strengthens it and energizes it, isn't that true, counteracting the effects of whatever might be in the blood that's bad for them. So to tell you the truth, I think any resistance phenomenon will happen a lot faster this way than it does by way of pesticides the bugs encounter at non-meal times, because the blood meal sustenance and nutrition stacks the odds so far in the bugs' favor.

    Let's see if any of the specialists comment on this. It's not to say don't look for something that can work in this fashion, and I certainly share the sentiment that it would be great if we could find some such, but just to point out that logically at least, it would seem to face a high hurdle from the outset.

  9. NoteToSelfPleaseRemainCalm

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    Posted 2 years ago
    Tue Sep 27 2011 23:52:32
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    jrbtnyc - 4 minutes ago  » 
    This effect, which enables bugs to become resistant to conventional pesticides, might be quite enhanced when the delivery mode is in the bugs' food, it seems to me.

    One reason bed bugs are so hard to kill is because we can't throw out bait with poison for them to eat then die like with other insects. I think being able to poison them thru the blood they ingest would help tremendously in eliminating infestations. I doubt resistant against the poison would develop at any faster rate than resistance against certain pesticides. The delivery mode for a pesticide might start externally but the kills happens internally so not sure how you could feel this approach wouldn't turn out promising. If you ever had a pet you would know this mode of delivery works amazing for animals with fleas. I think it could possibly work the same way for humans with bedbugs.


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