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ID & reflexion on skin reaction changes) [a: adult male bed bug or close rel.)

(6 posts)
  1. Zalemane

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 17:31:34
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    Hello all,

    This is my first post here; I registered yesterday when I started suspecting I've gotten bed bugs. Trying to add clues with the info I found on your excellent community was a bit overwhelming and, anyway, I haven't slept at all since the discovery.

    Beyond the pictures for ID requests, I'm trying to gave proper explanations regarding my situation's background as I believe that'll help the identification process and also helps me making sense of the situation; apologies if that makes me boring and go off-topic, I'm only trying to be specific out of respect for the community.

    To put things in context, I've been in my new one-room flat (aka "studio" with one main room + bathroom + kitchen) for maybe two weeks (with prior visits for moving) and there aren't that many furnitures. All the furnitures are new, including the latex bed with slatted bed base - but I've imported a lot of old books, some clothes and bed linens (but of which I had to wash and rewash at 60°C due to allergy). A bit before moving, I started developing an allergy to dust mites and it has followed me here.

    Most of my textiles are in the freezer or in zip-locks. The original intent was to deal with dust mites. But it could serve a dual purpose if your ID confirms my doubts, eh...

    So here is what I found yesterday:

    It looks like a final stage instar or an adult bed bug, if I compare with the online pictures of bed bugs. What do you think?

    Most importantly, I found it inside my bed sheet - the dead carcass dropped on my mattress' anti-dust mites encasement, as I was removing the bed sheet. (There were also legs but they were shattered due to my movements.) I guess that's strengthens the case...

    I have noticed no red marks or particular scratches; though my face does look flustered and did notice half of my neck being red the night before yesterday. However I put this on the account of dust mite allergy, because that day I could really feel the dust on my duvet cover - and it gave me a hellish night with the typical symptoms: coughing, watery eyes, running nose, etc.

    The thing is, I was already bitten by a bed bug about 5 years ago in a different country (and had no infestation when I came back home): the skin went unmistakably red around bite mark was visible and, I think, was itchy.

    What gives? How come with bed bugs now (assuming they are) I don't feel/see anything?
    I wonder if it's possible that my allergic reaction has evolved; just as my allergy to pollen expanded to dust mites (confirmed by the doctor). Or maybe it's a different sub-species of bed bug?

    I looked hard around and, save for what I photographed here, couldn't find any obvious sign of infestation in the furniture or walls: no black/white spots, no eggs, etc. But there are several crevices around the baseboards, and there's a slight opening between the parquet and the baseboards. Bedbugs paradise?

    Thank you in advance for the input you may provide me with regarding the bug and/or the change in reaction to bites!

    Edit: forgot to specify that I do use two wooden garden chairs that my parents lent me, but I just checked them again and nothing stood out.

  2. frightened

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 18:05:00
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    I am not an expert but a lot of people do not react immediately to bed bug bites. It can take anything from immediately or 24 hours to 14 days for the person to react to the bite. Apparently about 50% of people do not react at all. So it is difficult to say if you were bitten or when. I understand that the more exposure to bites you have the more your skin reacts generally.
    It could be that it is just a stray dead BB that just ended up in your sheet.
    One of the experts will be able to tell you if the BB has fed recently by looking at its size

  3. frightened

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 18:05:38
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    I am not an expert but a lot of people do not react immediately to bed bug bites. It can take anything from immediately or 24 hours to 14 days for the person to react to the bite. Apparently about 50% of people do not react at all. So it is difficult to say if you were bitten or when. I understand that the more exposure to bites you have the more your skin reacts generally.
    It could be that it is just a stray dead BB that just ended up in your sheet.
    One of the experts will be able to tell you if the BB has fed recently by looking at its size

  4. Zalemane

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 18:22:56
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    Cheers Frightened. It'd indeed be hard to pinpoint a time and location for hypothetical bites.

    I estimate that the BB could have gotten inside during a one week timeframe, but during this period, the same bed sheet from which the BB dropped down had been washed + dried at least two times.
    Which makes me wonder how come it hadn't been "evacuated" during those processes, if it did find itself in the bed sheet on such occasions. But anything's possible I guess.

    I realise I should take counter-measures ASAP, even if I'm lucky to have had a stray BB; I've ordered a passive monitor and will get Climbup-like traps for my bed.

  5. loubugs

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 18:40:09
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    Zalemane: It looks like a final stage instar or an adult bed bug, if I compare with the online pictures of bed bugs. What do you think?

    It's clearly an adult male. Asymmetrical tip to abdomen, small front wings. The adult characteristic basically is only evident in the adult; wings are also an adult character.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  6. Zalemane

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Mar 10 2016 18:58:06
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    loubugs - 12 minutes ago  » 
    It's clearly an adult male. Asymmetrical tip to abdomen, small front wings. The adult characteristic basically is only evident in the adult; wings are also an adult character.

    Thank you for the confirmation, Loubugs. At least now I can put a name with certainty on my (upcoming?) troubles.
    I've got to squint my eyes to perceive the front wings; I'm definitely not accustomed to the physionomy of these bugs


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