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BOOT A PEST - is the best ! Do yourself a huge favor and call JOHN FURMAN

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  1. danoola

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 20 2010 15:17:13
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    hello new yorkers!
    as u all know time is money!
    i will share my personal story with u.i feel this guy is LEGIT ;EDUCATED:SMART and worth every dollar!
    don't be fooled by shady handlers who have dogs come in and scratch your furniture.
    Anext door apt. in our bldng was checked by a dog who scratched the master bedrooms bed. My friend started getting bites for a week or so.
    Since we are friends the girl called me and said:
    Hey the K9 is here. would u like him to check your place?
    i said:SURE.
    in less then one minute the dog scratched a living room couch; my master bed in bedroom and my sons twin bed in his room.
    We had 0 sympotms,no bites- we checked and the mattresses- NADA.
    our building manager ( lux white glove doorman bldng in the upper west side lincoln center area)
    had already schedueld an extermination process handing me a list of instructions from here till paris.
    dry clean everything u own.
    Vaccum everything u own.
    Bag in sealed plastic bags each toy;book;cd;hair brush..
    u get the point?
    leave your apt. for 24 hours and reside somewhere else.. etc.
    I asked for the handler to actually show me what the dog just found. He said0
    "Well, i am not an inspector so you should get an inspector"
    a few days go by.i am googling;checking; my bldng manager mad and upset that i did not already start preparing my place.
    I did not sleep for 4 nights worried i have to throw out the beds;dry clean my stuff for min of 2000 dollars; have 2 cleaning ladies help me with laundry;packing; etc.- so i went online.
    thank god, i saw JOHN FURMAN name out there. i set an appointment with him.
    Today- the exterminator selected by my building appeared to " confirm" visually prior to treatment any evidence of bed bugs. NADA.
    Then, the real expert shows up- JOHN FURMAN from BOOT A PEST- he turned the place upsidwon,checking with magnifying glass and flashlights. more then 2 hours.
    guess what?
    we do not have bed bugs in my apt!!!!!
    OMG .. yey...
    i totally learned about the dog's method and what is really going on.
    Basically- if u do not have actual bites it takes along time to see if u had or have any bed bugs.
    John saved me and my family time,effort and money.
    Not to mention peace of mind to sleep at night.
    i highly reccomend him and will hire him anytime i need!!
    Before any treatment to your place think about one call that can save u so much !!
    all the best to JOHN and keep on doing the great work!
    Happy Happy BED BUG FREE new york mom

  2. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 20 2010 20:34:27
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    Thanks for the kind words danoola!

    I'm glad I was able to help.

    2 dogs dead wrong yesterday ... 2 wrong dogs today ... typical day for a bed bug inspector here in NY.

    I hope more people open their eyes and get educated before using a dog.

    Thanks again danoola ... Best, John

  3. LVK9

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu May 20 2010 22:50:28
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    John with all due respect, if you are on this site to truly help people why not name the names of the companies that were wrong? Anyone can say I was right and the other (unnamed) company was wrong, that sounds more like self promotion. Don't take this the wrong way I think the industry needs more people like you that are knowledgeable and dedicated. If you want to help point out the companies that in your opinion people should shy away from.

  4. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 0:59:28
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    I cant offer up a list unfortunately because I have been threatened with lawsuits via email, private messages on this site, and calls into my office from both independent teams and PCO companies. All because I have educated another person who has had a bad inspection by a K9 team.

    I’m honest with the people I meet and try my best to help anyone who calls into my office. Some people find me searching google, from this site and others, or through referrals. If I'm more active writing on this site I get hit with more emails and messages, and truthfully I can't keep up with the demand. So while I am here on the site I have had to limit my posts because it just gets to crazy. I can't even squeeze in an inspection right now until June, thats how packed my schedule gets. It's not uncommon that I'm booked 2 weeks out. I would love to have a K9 team that I could refer to people looking for an inspection during these times.

    I have had independent K9 teams contact me looking to work hand and hand and I have taken a few chances with them. You have to remember that my name goes along with the recommendation of another company. I have worked very hard to be the best I can in this business and I'm not trashing my company name so that others can make money off me.

    None of these K9 teams have proved to me they can do this job anywhere close to the numbers they get credit for. Both K9 teams from PCO companies or independents. I hate having to criticize my own industry but the truth is the truth and what I see on a regular basis makes me sick!

    I had mentioned in another thread I did 4 inspections in two days behind bad dogs. 2 of these inspections I did for free because I already knew I was going to find evidence within minutes of searching. It took longer to find a parking spot then come up with the evidence I needed.

    I had a guy call me 3 days ago - He told me he had 2 bites over the last week. I asked some basic questions about his bed type .. and advised him how to do his own inspection and where he would find his bugs based on the info he provided. This conversation was while he was at work and at 8:30 PM he calls me back with a bug in a jar. His own landlord's son is an exterminator and guess who he wants working for him? (For my client - If you are reading this please create a screen name and confirm this story)

    As I have stated in the past, I know there are good inspections done by k9's. I have gone behind teams that said people had bed bugs .. I have inspected and found said evidence (meaning the dog was right). People at times second guess the dog and get another opinion-thats where I come in. The point of the first inspection is to confirm bed bugs and when people are paying $300 - $750 just to know if they have them, they should get this evidence the first time and not need somebody else to come in and inspect behind a "premium service".

    I don't know what more I can say .... I know what I see and its far more then anyone who plans on getting this type of inspection once, twice, or three times. If I had clients post their experience here after a K9... you would get bored with all the BS - trust me 90% or more don't get the evidence they pay for.

  5. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 1:20:17
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    People considering hiring a dog team should read our FAQ: Bed Bug Sniffing Dogs: What You Need to Know.

    Dogs can be effective but you need to ask the handler in advance (before hiring them) whether they visually confirm alerts.

    KQ, you said,

    (For my client - If you are reading this please create a screen name and confirm this story)

    With respect, I ask that service providers do not encourage clients to write reviews.

    (I know you want additional confirmation of what you're saying, but anonymous posts on a forum don't really definitively do this anyway.)

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  6. JWhiteBBCTV

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 8:14:24
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    Sometimes I think we should change the name of the site from "Bedbugger" over to "How Great John Furman is". Kickin a** and takin names John. Good for you.

    I have to second John's recent experiences with bed bug dogs. I've been running into a lot of really bad canine scent inspections lately and what I feared would happen is starting to happen. Too many dogs and too many people not doing it right and I don't think I've come across a good canine scent inspection with results that made sense in a long time. Even in some of the better inspections (where dogs inspected a large number of rooms and only provided a positive in a small percentage), we've been confirming those positive indications in a small percentage of those rooms. For example, Dog inspects 2000 rooms, says there are bed bugs in 30, we've only been confirming maybe 8 of those 30 which isn't a good rate.

    The industry is starting to say "show me the bug" meaning if a dog indicates, the industry is starting to say find the bug and confirm it. If that's the case, I haven't seen a good canine scent in a long time.

  7. djames1921

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 9:06:52
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    Killer queen rocks! I know this because I get the chance to talk to his customers occasionally. Listen to jeff, nobugsonme, Kq, David Cain, Lou Sorkin, Mike Potter, anyone else I can think of that knows anything about bed bugs, if getting a dog inspection make sure before you hire that they are going to confirm the dog with a visual inspection. "Show me the bugs!"

  8. LVK9

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 9:55:10
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    Oh don't get me wrong, I feel bad about the things I hear on this site about peoples experiences with K-9 Inspections. It is a very hard occupation and I am not referring to the field work. The hard part is everything that is or should be done day in and day out for the working life of the canine as far as training goes. And after months and years of continuing training you realize that this is forever. Going on vacation pack the vials and bring your dog, yep forever. Ultimately I just want the team to be accurate in their findings whatever that takes to happen must be done. I am also not one to say canines are the end all be all either, they have their place as another tool. I look at suspect K-9 teams like I do companies who offer treatment even though the only evidence is "bite marks".

    I never thought about the legal aspect of naming names this does pose a problem. I just feel the market could weed out the bad or lackadaisical teams or make them work harder to become better teams.

  9. LVK9

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 10:58:17
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    Jeff, commercial setting offer challenges that are not typically found in residential settings. You mentioned inspecting 2000 rooms, the handler of each canine must be acutely aware of his or hers canines nose time. This is the time that a canine is used to working without being introduced to the target scent, handlers can increase this time only during training. If a canine is pushed past it's current nose time self rewarding behavior is possible. Lets say during training the canines maximum amount of time of inspection before being introduced to the target order is 30 min. This goes on for months and months of training, 30 minute becomes that canines current nose time. Now during an inspection of a large facility the handler pushes past the 30 minute mark without coming across the target scent, the canine can start to think time is up and self rewarding behavior can happen. This is the handlers fault, they should either break the canine at the 30 min. mark or increase the nose time during training. I am not saying this is what happened in your example, just thought I would share my thoughts.

  10. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 13:15:18
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    JWhiteBBCTV - 4 hours ago  » 
    Even in some of the better inspections (where dogs inspected a large number of rooms and only provided a positive in a small percentage), we've been confirming those positive indications in a small percentage of those rooms. For example, Dog inspects 2000 rooms, says there are bed bugs in 30, we've only been confirming maybe 8 of those 30 which isn't a good rate.

    I hate to think about how many of the 1970 "cleared" rooms may have been false negatives.

  11. rothalion

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Fri May 21 2010 21:25:34
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    They need to switch to cats. My cat seems to love hunting the damn things down.

  12. thebedbugresource

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat May 22 2010 10:47:16
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    If people would just hire K9 companies that visually verify their dog's findings much of the woes could be avoided. I hate that there are companies out there doing a poor job and giving the rest of us a bad name.

    There are some EXCELLENT K9 handler/dog teams out there doing some fantastic work. As much as John is a machine in terms of bed bug inspection there is absolutely no possibility that he can perform as well as a good K9 team.

    Keep up the good work John.

    Sean
    Pest Professional/Entomologist

  13. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat May 22 2010 14:25:07
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    Yo big shout out to my man John F. sending the bad dogs to the doghouse. One reason why you really need to be careful which team you choose. At this point if you have a K9 inspection and there are a lot of hits where there is no other evidence in the majority of units it should ring a bell and most assuredly you need to recheck before investing a lot of time, money, effort and hardship to keep the pests a way.
    Know what I mean .......................butter bean like times 3.

  14. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sat May 22 2010 19:18:51
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    Winston,

    Thanks for keeping it real.

  15. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun May 23 2010 15:14:28
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    Hi,

    I could not agree more with the comments above about the need to confirm a K9 alert with visual identification, in fact there is a fact sheet to help people understand why it is necessary and how to do it here:

    http://www.bedbugbeware.com/confirmingBBsignsfinal.pdf

    At times as an industry we fall into the trap of drawing lines of demarcation on the basis of dog friendly or not. I think the real advances will only come when we see as an industry that K9's are a very powerful tool but may not be best applied in a domestic settings and that they should always be confirmed.

    I would recommend any K9 service provider to step up to the plate and offer a pricing structure that differs based on visual confirmation. No visual confirmation and you pay a lower fee, call it put you money where you dogs nose is.

    In the meantime we need to educate the media and consumers as to the need to confirm visually before treatment starts. After all you cant take the K9 on the business trip to check the rooms before you stay the night.

    I see the future of K9 work being in non standard environments and certainly our modeling work would indicate this.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.
  16. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 24 2010 0:12:09
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    NP Nobugs ... I get it.

    Thank you everyone for the kind words!!! I appreciate it a lot.

  17. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon May 24 2010 1:40:08
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    KillerQueen - 1 hour ago  » 
    NP Nobugs ... I get it.
    Thank you everyone for the kind words!!! I appreciate it a lot.

    Thanks, KQ.

    Looks like you just got enveloped in a big old pest pro group hug.

  18. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 25 2010 19:37:24
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    Thanks, KQ.
    Looks like you just got enveloped in a big old pest pro group hug.

    lol yeah!! No milanos these days .... The Queen is on a diet =(

  19. diebbsdie

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Tue May 25 2010 21:53:45
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    hello,
    sorry to jump in here, but i had a horrible K-9 inspection experience. One that left me almost traumatized.
    if i named the company could i get in trouble with them?
    based on this site, i have already decided the next time i get major bites and suspect bed bugs, i'm definitely calling killer queen or jeff! no dogs for me, unless they recommend them.

    it's good to know there are some respectable, caring PCOs out there!
    Killerqueen--I hope you have some PCOs in training so you can get a break sometimes!

    Thanks so much.

  20. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed May 26 2010 3:12:27
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    diebbsdie - 4 hours ago  » 

    sorry to jump in here, but i had a horrible K-9 inspection experience. One that left me almost traumatized.
    if i named the company could i get in trouble with them?

    I am not a lawyer, but as I understand it, it is okay to post reviews of products or services which truthfully represent your experiences.

    The Chilling Effects FAQ on Protest, Parody and Criticism sites states,

    Question: What is the legal definition of defamation?

    Question: What is defamation?

    Answer: An attack by speech on the good reputation of a person or business entity. Speech that involves a public figure--such as a corporation--is only defamatory if it is false and said with actual malice. It also must be factual rather than an expression of an opinion. In the United States, because of our strong free speech protections, it is almost impossible to prove defamation of a public figure.

    Answer: The elements that must be proved to establish defamation are: (1) A publication to one other than the person defamed; (2) of a false statement of fact; (3) which is understood as being of and concerning the plaintiff; and (4) which is understood in such a way as to tend to harm the reputation of plaintiff.

    The Electronic Freedom Foundation's Online Defamation FAQ states:

    Is truth a defense to defamation claims?
    Yes. Truth is an absolute defense to a defamation claim. But keep in mind that the truth may be difficult and expensive to prove.

    Can my opinion be defamatory?

    No—but merely labeling a statement as your "opinion" does not make it so. Courts look at whether a reasonable reader or listener could understand the statement as asserting a statement of verifiable fact. (A verifiable fact is one capable of being proven true or false.) This is determined in light of the context of the statement. A few courts have said that statements made in the context of an Internet bulletin board or chat room are highly likely to be opinions or hyperbole, but they do look at the remark in context to see if it's likely to be seen as a true, even if controversial, opinion ("I really hate George Lucas' new movie") rather than an assertion of fact dressed up as an opinion ("It's my opinion that Trinity is the hacker who broke into the IRS database").

    Here's where it gets messy: even if you are telling the truth, it's always possible people will try to sue you, or threaten to do so. (In the US at least, there are people who will try or threaten to sue you under all kinds of circumstances.)

    However, they probably won't get very far, and they'd have to be kind of crazy to go down that road.

    Again, I don't have a legal background, but it also seems possible that statements from John Furman about another service provider (who may be seen as a competitor) may have additional legal ramifications.

  21. Davisro

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jun 13 2010 0:48:30
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    John did an inspection at our apartment today. He's very knowledgeable, friendly and truly understands what people go through.

    We'd suffered a few overnight bites of unknown origin and were worried about bed bugs. I thoroughly inspected our bedroom and found a number of very tiny bugs, which we stuck to scotch tape and bagged. We vacuumed incessantly and had a bedbug-sniffing dog come in who gave a soft alert in our room, but the handler's conclusion was that the finding was negative...no bedbugs. Which was good news.

    But over the following two weeks we were just not comfortable.

    We weren't convinced of the dog's findings because a dog's training and the handler's skill are factors in the result, and can sometimes produce inconclusive results or false positives.

    I don't disagree with Sean's comment above that there are good dog teams, but there are not-so-good dog teams as well. Sean's employer in Vancouver started using a K-9 last year, but lets face it, with the anxiety and concern that comes with a possible infestation, I want to see the evidence with my own two eyes; nothing else will do.

    so, we were constantly looking at every speck on the walls, floors, our bedding , and finding things. More taping and bagging.

    I finally called John after reading about him here. We made an appointment; he spent a few hours inspecting our room, taking things apart, showing us where bugs hide or leave evidence such as eggs or fecal matter, and I saw for myself: no bugs. It was great, and SO worth it, because NOW we are comfortable.

    Thanks John. You're the best!

  22. KillerQueen

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Sun Jun 13 2010 22:50:29
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    Thanks Davisro!!

    It was nice meeting both of you. I'm glad I was able to help .... now put the magnifying lens down =) Nite Nite

  23. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jun 14 2010 2:01:09
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    I would love to see KQ specify the names of companies that fail to perform a visual verification of their K9 team alerts, but I fully understand the reasons that he declines to do so.

    The truth is a good defense for a defamation lawsuit, but it can be very expensive to prove the point in court.

    I am developing a website that will only list K9 teams that agree to adhere to a simple protocol for verification of any K9 alerts. The handlers will also be required to pass a comprehensive examination regarding their knowledge of bed bugs and pest control.

    The part that I am still struggling with is how to get meaningful feedback from clients that can't be spoofed by malicious competitors.

    I want to provide meaningful consumer ratings for each K9 team, but haven't figured out how to verify that the feedback is coming from legitimate consumers.

    I am open to suggestions on how to structure the site for honest consumer feedback.

    I would also like to point out that the problem usually isn't good dog vs bad dog.

    When there is a problem with a K9 team... it is almost always a question of good handling / training practices vs poor handling practices on the part of the human holding the leash.

    The human is the weak link... The solution is to identify the skilled handlers that consumers can trust to properly verify the presence of bed bugs in the locations that are identified by the K9 screening.

    I am thoroughly disgusted with companies that fail to make any effort to verify the accuracy of their team's findings.

    I hope to have the website up and running by the end of the year

  24. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jun 14 2010 5:23:47
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    Hi Doug,

    Great idea, if you need any of the images or resources we have let me know. I am sure NoBugs will also allow the fact sheet we worked on to be included as well.

    Its all about the visual confirmation with us.

    David

  25. djames1921

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jun 14 2010 8:48:37
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    Doug,

    Awesome idea. It is not fun to see the bad drag down the good, and your idea will help separate the two.

  26. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jun 14 2010 14:33:29
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    Hi Doug,

    Happy to keep a provisional list on bedbugbeware.com until you get up and running.

    I will send you a PM and can update the site with a table now.

    David

  27. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Mon Jun 14 2010 14:48:57
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    Thanks, I really appreciate your support.

    I think Killer Queen's observations are raising consumer awareness... which is going to lead companies with K9 teams to embrace the quality control issue.

    "Show me the bugs" is the proper standard for K9 inspections.

    The K9 is a screening tool that allows us to select a well defined search area... A K9 alert can be presumptive in some situations, but it is not the same as a visual identification.

    I feel very strongly that K9 handlers need to be knowledgeable and qualified to perform a proper inspection with or without their K9's assistance.

    I will send you an email and we can start collaborating on the project.


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