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Bed Bugs and Dogs - Frontline

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  1. Al

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 12:23:42
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    HI All - nother question - My dog has frontline - to kill all ticks and fleas - so far it worked well. Now we have bed-bugs - will they also die if they suck Frontline trated dog??
    The active ingredients in Frontline plus are fipronil and S-methoprene. Id does not go into pet's blood but instead concentrates on pet's fur - through the oil gland and it is contact killer for fleas and other stuff.

  2. angie

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 12:29:34
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    I have treated my short haired dog with advantage and numerous flea baths but she still gets bit. I feel sorry for her cuz she is so stocky that she cannot reach anything behind her neck. She loves when my sister comes over who has nails and will scratch her back. I don't think that the frontline or advantage gets in the blood cuz I haven't been finding any dead ones, only well fed very much alive ones.

  3. bmorebugger

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 12:56:10
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    Hello,

    I am also concerned about my pets (beagle and kitten). I use Advantage on my dog and Frontline on my cat. I have called numerous vets and have yet to receive any definitive answers. Some say that the medicine works other say they don't. I called the number on the back of the Advantage box and they have no proof or research that say it kills bed bugs. I've had my dog at my parents house for the past 2 weeks and have left my cat at the house.

    I also would love to hear feedback on this situation!!

  4. jennifer09

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 13:07:04
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    Hi,
    I called my vet (I have a dog) and they told me Frontline would most likely NOT work on bed bugs. No one is completely definitive so I bathe her once a week and keep her out of the bedroom. But I definitely do not rely on Frontline to kill them. I also check her daily and comb her coat. She got bit early on but now that I've had 2 treatments she seems to be okay. Hope that helps.

  5. jennifer09

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 13:20:25
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    Hi,
    I called my vet (I have a dog) and they told me Frontline would most likely NOT work on bed bugs. No one is completely definitive so I bathe her once a week and keep her out of the bedroom. But I definitely do not rely on Frontline to kill them. I also check her daily and comb her coat. She got bit early on but now that I've had 2 treatments she seems to be okay. Hope that helps.

  6. itchyincharmcity

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Thu Dec 13 2007 14:31:22
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    hey bmore bugger, are you in Baltimore? We are developing quite a little club around here.

    Yes your pets can get bitten, particularly when you ae not available to the BBs. They prefer humans, and they are not really designed to crawl through fur, so your skin is a lot more attractive. But a dog or cat will do. Some people around here have reported their dogs getting bitten more on their underbelly, where there is less fur.

    I believe that no flea/tick treatments are known to kill bedbugs. Some people think they might help deter BBS a bit. At any rate, they can't hurt. Search the forum, recently a professional BB dog handler posted the protocol he uses to protect his animals. I believe it involves a lot of bathing.

  7. bugbasher

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 21 2007 21:17:09
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    Hi, I'm a in the animal health field and can tell you for a fact that these vets don't know.It's hard enough to keep up with animal bugs and maladies,they just haven't had any experience with this.I thought about the same thing.My animals are on frontline and if they're getting bitten they're asymptomatic like us(my boyfriend and myself).I have seen no welts or itching.Have you? I was wondering if some animals react,my neighbor thinks her cat has maybe shown signs,but it went away now.Please let me know ....

  8. bugobsessed

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 21 2007 21:49:19
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    I know my one cat definitely got bitten on his ear. He now has a scar in that spot.

  9. badlybugged

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 13:48:47
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    So, what is the general consensus of opinion regarding pets and the infested bed? My dogs both sleep with me in the bed, or right under the metal frame, and also sleep in the bed during the times I'm absent. I have had much treatment including steam treatment and have gotten bites yet again (5 days post treatment). Do the bb's live on the dogs? During the day? Do they just hitch a ride on the dogs from room to room? Did one post say someone is washing his dogs daily? This is an unsupportable solution for me; I do not have the strength (handicapped) to bathe the dogs even once let alone daily. What are the proof, evidence, personal experiences with pets and bbs?

  10. jennifer09

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 15:25:11
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    Hi badlybugged,
    I have a dog and have been using Frontline. However, my vet told me it would not likely work on bb's. So...I isolated my new bed and bought a gate and now keep my dog outside the bedroom. It's hard b/c she loves sleeping next to my bed but I can't risk the fact that she might be bringing them into the bedroom.

    I wash her once every two weeks since I've had bb's. I do a dry wash (the powder and comb her once a week. Hope that helps and good luck!

  11. Bugologist

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 17:14:17
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    Ok, after a brief phone call to my veternarian wife (yes an entomolgist and vet together) this is what I have.

    The products available on the market for dogs and cats for tick and/or flea prevention have not been tested on bed bugs. So any information presented after this statement on their potentional effect on bed bugs is strictly scientific opinion based on the modes of action of these products.

    Frontline and Advantage does NOT systemically affect the animal and thus, is passed and maintained in the sebaceous glands of the animal (skin). This, as an entomolgist, doesn't make sense to me from a tick control perspective. The ticks will not die strictly from walking on the animal and must feed to be effected. Ticks do not feed on the skin and pierce the skin in order to feed on blood. If the products do not get into the blood, the only reason I can think of that ticks die is because of their close, long-term contact with the skin while feeding on blood unless there is something else going on that I'm unaware of. If that is the case, as we know, bed bugs do not have a long-term association with the skin (they take 10 minutes or so to get a full-blood meal) and therefore, may not be greatly affected by these products. If there is something going on that I'm overlooking, maybe these products are effective against bed bugs.

    Revolution is a product that is also applied to the skin that does affect the animal systemically (meaning gets into the blood) and seems like a better option for possible affect on bed bugs. This product has a different active ingredient depending on whether you're treating a dog or cat and bed bugs should not have resistances to these products (theoretically). Thus, if you are treating your dog or cat for possible bed bug exposure, I would lean towards Revolution since it is systemic.

    The other product on the market is Advantix which is only available for dogs and repels fleas, ticks and moquitoes. This product has Imidicolprid and Permethrin. The permethrin is the product that repels insects but I'm unsure how long it lasts for or if it would be effective against bed bugs. I can tell you that you CANNOT use it on cats. Cats cannot metabolize Permethrin and it will cause them to have seizures and possibly die but your vet will know this and not provide you with it if you have cats.

    Again, the above are just educated information and guesses and there is no scientific information to back any of the above information. Just a scientist looking at the facts and making a suggestion.

  12. Anonymous

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Fri Dec 28 2007 23:48:42
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    My heart goes out to anyone dealing with this with pets. It must be so hard. I know people often rethink things like isolating the bed if they have pets.

    Thanks for the info, Bugologist.

    I recommend people also read the posts by K9Handler in this thread: http://bedbugger.com/forum/topic/pets

    Badlybugged, I think probably the most important thing would be to take care of their bedding (and any toys) and resting areas the same as your bed, frequent inspecting, cleaning and washing. No, the bugs will not live on the dogs.

  13. badlybugged

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Dec 29 2007 0:38:07
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    Thanks for the input from all posts.

    This afternoon the PCO returned to inspect and possibly retreat. He found no -- I mean nada, nothing, no evidence -- dead (from the last thorough treatment) or alive (currently) bbs. There are two very small drops of blood on my pillow case and I awakened today with my upper lip itching fiercely; also, I have new red spots on my body/torso?? I'm at a loss . . . I don't have the vaguest idea what could be causing this skin irritation if not bbs???? BTW, my dogs are on K9 Advantix because of the B52 like mosquitoes here in Southeast Louisiana. I have never heard of the product "Revolution" but will investigate.

  14. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Dec 29 2007 0:53:01
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    Here's a techincal sheet on Fipronil, the active ingredient in Frontline. Doesn't indicate why it might not be effective against BBs. It is a fairly potent neurotoxin, so use it according to instructions.

    http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/actives/fipronil.htm

  15. Anonymous

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sat Dec 29 2007 15:19:57
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    Badlybugged,

    But your infestation was confirmed, is that correct? You caught a live bug at some point?

    How carefully is your PCO inspecting? You should know that bedbugs hide very well and can stump even very experienced, very patient PCOs.

    You have to keep monitoring. It is also common to continue to get bites after a treatment. After all, more than one treatment is usually necessary. Make sure to have the PCO come back for another inspection two weeks or so after the last one.

    It is possible to have unrelated skin conditions, but in your case, after a recently treated, confirmed infestation, that is not the most reasonable explanation. The most reasonable explanation is that you are still being bitten.

    I hope things improve. It can take time for all the bugs to come in contact with the treatments and die. Keep up the vigilance, but also keep up your spirits. This will end.

  16. badlybugged

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 1:46:24
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    Since my last post I’ve encased the mattress in a cover/bag recommended by your site, not the box springs (yet) though – I’ll get to that next. I’ve rerun all my clothes through the dryer and re-bagged them. The bags with the zipper top (not Ziploc brand) work very well even for fully filled bags. I got a great night’s sleep last night, no new bites!!

  17. Anonymous

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    Posted 6 years ago
    Sun Dec 30 2007 1:50:52
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    A great night's sleep is beautiful. I hope it continues.

  18. Vickytoria3112

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Thu Aug 12 2010 14:59:53
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    I'm no expert but I've been letting my dog stay in at night the last couple of days (I'm in Florida, a lot of tropical storms) and ever since she's been inside I haven't been bitten. I think the Frontline plus is working on my behalf. Poor doggy. She stays in my room on the floor or in her crate (where ever she prefers)I can't isolate her because then that area may become infested. Plus the bed bugs get around pretty quick so they will get you no matter where you are.

  19. bedbughell34

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Wed Sep 25 2013 23:47:30
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    The active ingredient in Frontline, fipronil, IS effective against bedbugs. In fact, the LD50 (a measure of killing effectiveness) is better for fipronil than DDT or permethrin. If you want proof, you can read the abstract here: http://comp.uark.edu/~aszalan/bed_bugs/Insecticide_Resistance.html.

    We struggled through BED BUG HELL for months, and by far the most effective (and cheapest) treatment has been the use of a really good steam machine. I'm not talking about the thing that you pour hot water into to clean your carpets. What you need is a canister that heats up, and the steam comes out of a hose at 210 degrees. I bought mine used, but good ones cost $100 and up. Steam every crack in your bedframe. Steam your pets bed. Steam your mattress. Steam your carpet. Steam the baseboards. Steam the walls. Steam the curtains. Steam the dresser. Steam the desk. I came up with HUNDREDS of dead bugs the first time around. I steamed every night for the first 2 weeks and now every 3 days. I haven't been bitten in over a week which is huge because at one point I looked like I had measles from all the bites.

    I have also done this: encasing mattresses, putting beding in the dryer every night for 20 minutes on high, diatomaceous earth in a thin dusting, a pesticide called bifenthrin, spraying an insect growth regulator (Gentrol), Frontline for my pets, and vaccuuming. By far THE MOST EFFECTIVE TREATMENT WAS THE STEAM.

  20. needrest

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Thu Sep 26 2013 8:38:51
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    I gotta agree with Bedbughell34 about the use of steam. A lot of work but it really pays off.

  21. Hemiptera

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Fri Sep 27 2013 1:07:06
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    http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/31/pill-could-join-arsenal-against-bedbugs/

    Scientific research has shown that the heart worm medication given to most dogs can kill bedbugs.
    Ivermectin is the one under study.

  22. Nemo

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Fri Sep 27 2013 17:51:51
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    That article is way too optimistic. Ivermectin is unlikely to be useful against bed bugs because you would have to dose someone with it for an extended period of time to be effective. Like mentioned in the article, when it is given to someone, it's in one to three doses typically separated by a week or more. Ivermectin has the possible risk of liver damage, as well as other side effects. Its safety as a long-term treatment in humans is unknown, and to me the risk of liver failure is a pretty serious down side to consider when the up side is getting rid of bed bugs.

    If you follow the link to the meeting abstract, the dosage mentioned for the human volunteers, 200 micrograms/kilogram, is the same as prescribed for single dose treatment or doses separated by 7-10 days for other parasitic conditions. But you can't get rid of bed bugs with one or two doses of a drug like this. They'd either have to extend the treatment duration or treat more frequently, or both (testing was done 3 hours after treatment, what if a bed bug bites you 3 days later?)

    I found this research was published in The Journal of Emergency Medicine (seems an odd choice), but unfortunately I don't have access.

  23. StressedinSF

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    Posted 1 year ago
    Tue Oct 1 2013 1:45:17
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    I am in the animal health field too so I thought I would briefly comment on what I know about the products you have been discussing.

    Frontline contains Fipronyl (insecticide) and S-methoprene (insect growth regulator). Depending on the study, it takes 4 - 18 hours of continuous contact for the fipronyl to kill fleas. The s-methoprene breaks the flea life cycle.

    Permethrin repels and kills fleas, ticks, mosquitoes etc. So, a tick for example, will reach out for a passing dog, hitch a ride, initially burrow into the hair coat but then instead of biting, because of the repellency it will back out, fall off and eventually die. This process usually takes at least 2 hours.

    Regarding Revolution, the systemic ingredients protect against heartworm disease and intestinal parasites. The ingredient that protects against fleas, mites and ticks is not systemic and spreads through the lipid layer of your pets skin just like frontline, advantage and others.

    So, as others have stated, the bed bugs don’t feed long enough to die. With the topicals, the insecticide is not in your pet’s bloodstream it is in the lipid layer that resides on top of the skin. So contact with the lipid layer, not blood feeding is the important part. (Actually there are 2 products that are systemic and use a bacteria to kill fleas - comfortis and trifexis)

    I also read somewhere that the surface area of a bed bugs leg is less than other insects and could also contribute to their ability to survive after biting a pet and coming in contact with these products.
    I think the ingredients in several of these products are being studied but who knows if they’ll have any residual properties.


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