Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Detection / Identification of bed bugs

Bed bug ID please -- small mystery bug in bedroom and kitchen

(7 posts)
  1. Ercwhi55

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '17
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sat Dec 16 2017 16:21:27
    #



    Login to Send PM

    594F5E7E-D451-4D4D-97A0-4CD2B4E64D07 by Bob Bugg, on Flickr

    B567B45C-2CE7-4B20-A5E1-F5923F7DC754 by Bob Bugg, on Flickr

    E79E59C5-EC9A-4706-88D8-EF135C6F8F23 by Bob Bugg, on Flickr

    3553B14A-B948-42B0-AA0F-3759E6A4FAF1 by Bob Bugg, on Flickr

    Please help! I found a live one of these at night on my sheets. Then I found two identical ones (but not moving) on a paper towel near the kitchen sink, near books/magazines. Curiously, at first they had what looked like little white specks/perhaps tiny pieces of my dead skin or cloth or paper on their long necks/heads (see last photo). But this morning those were gone. I haven't noticed any other signs of bed bugs. I'm wondering if they're that or maybe booklice? Any idea?

  2. Bedbugmom41

    junior member
    Joined: Aug '17
    Posts: 97

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sat Dec 16 2017 21:00:08
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Not bedbug.

  3. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,270

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sun Dec 17 2017 4:35:11
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ercwhi55 - 12 hours ago  » 
    Please help! I found a live one of these at night on my sheets. Then I found two identical ones (but not moving) on a paper towel near the kitchen sink, near books/magazines. Curiously, at first they had what looked like little white specks/perhaps tiny pieces of my dead skin or cloth or paper on their long necks/heads (see last photo). But this morning those were gone. I haven't noticed any other signs of bed bugs. I'm wondering if they're that or maybe booklice? Any idea?

    Obviously not bed bug, not booklouse. This is one of the latridiid beetles, the minute brown scavenger beetles, some known as plaster beetles. This one is distinctive for the white, waxy material that forms on parts of its body. These beetles feed on molds and there is a moisture-related issue. Can be condensation, a build-up of moisture and mold growth somewhere, often bathroom, kitchen, something related to plumbing, drainage, etc. Please compare to pictures of bed bugs and booklice so you can easily see the differences.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  4. Ercwhi55

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '17
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sun Dec 17 2017 10:21:26
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thank you both. They looked a little more like the photos of bedbugs posted on this site under my 40x microscope (though I couldn’t take pictures of that): especiallt the oval-with-tip body and leg placement. They just seemed to have longer head segments but I thought that might be a nymph-stage quirk. I’m going to take the ones I collected—one of which is still alive in the ziplock bag—to the county lab and have them make an ID. I’ll follow up with what the lab says these are. Thanks again!

  5. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,270

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sun Dec 17 2017 10:39:29
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ercwhi55 - 15 minutes ago  » 
    Thank you both. They looked a little more like the photos of bedbugs posted on this site under my 40x microscope (though I couldn’t take pictures of that): especiallt the oval-with-tip body and leg placement. They just seemed to have longer head segments but I thought that might be a nymph-stage quirk. I’m going to take the ones I collected—one of which is still alive in the ziplock bag—to the county lab and have them make an ID. I’ll follow up with what the lab says these are. Thanks again!

    Please see my last sentence.
    Please compare to pictures of bed bugs and booklice so you can easily see the differences.
    They look nothing like adult or nymphal bed bugs except that they are insects so there's a head, thorax and abdomen.
    County lab might come up with Eufallia seminivea. I'm basing on photos and not specimens. There are records of it biting people. Of course, this is different from bed bug biting where the insect is obtaining blood. The beetle is just biting, maybe tasting, but this can occur in many insects or mites when substrate tasting is performed.

  6. Ercwhi55

    newbite
    Joined: Dec '17
    Posts: 3

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Sun Dec 17 2017 14:48:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Thanks again! I put the live one under the microscope again and it does resemble Eufallia seminivea, particularly the barbed antennae.

  7. loubugs

    old timer
    Joined: Mar '07
    Posts: 12,270

    offline

    Posted 1 year ago
    Mon Dec 18 2017 7:47:39
    #



    Login to Send PM

    Ercwhi55 - 16 hours ago  » 
    Thanks again! I put the live one under the microscope again and it does resemble Eufallia seminivea, particularly the barbed antennae.

    Not barbed, but clubbed.


RSS feed for this topic


Reply

You must log in to post.

297,275 posts in 50,155 topics over 155 months by 21,924 of 22,420 members. Latest: duracell, Parawail, Quiltergirl