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Bed Bug horrors in low-income HUD housing

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  1. otaku1811

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 2:44:49
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    My battle began on September 26th when I found a bed bug in my bath tub. I live in a HUD housing highrise building for low-income elderly and disabled people, and two months ago someone on the 7th floor was discovered to have a nasty bed bug infestation. So many things were done wrong on the side of the tenants involved and the Saratoga Housing Authority management people who run the show here.

    First, the infested mattresses were dragged out of the apartment, scattering bugs onto the floor and into the elevator, through the hallways, and then outside where they were propped up against the wall right next to the back entrance of the building. Total disaster! The bugs not only got spread around, but they were in a very convenient place to just walk right back in or hitchhike around to other units!

    To make matters worse, the Housing Authority let the mattress and infested box spring sit out there for an entire weekend before it was removed on the following Monday (because their offices are closed on the weekends and they don't really care about us poor folk, sad but true). So now, two months have passed and more incidents are popping up in my building. Now all of a sudden someone on the 6th floor is infested (the same floor I live on!) and more and more people are finding bugs showing up in new places. I had just woken up and gone tot he bathroom when I found mine in the tub, presumably it had fallen in from the ceiling vent from the infested 7th floor. So I captured the big in a jar and went right down tot he Housing office on the first floor of this building and showed it to them. They immediately told me "It's not our responsibility, it's up to the tenants to treat their own infestations."

    This obviously did not sit well for me so I spoke to some other tenants who also got the same answer from the Authority when they voiced their concerns over the matter. Discussions then led me to calling the Board of Health and pest control companies, and of course, seeking out information on the internet about the rules, regulations, and laws regarding landlords and pest control. From here on out I will paste my e-mail correspondences with the head of Housing here and I am truly interested in knowing what you all think and what can possibly be done in a situation where you have a landlord that is unwilling to step up and do his part. There are a lot of people in this building, over 90 units total, and many are unable to do what needs to be done to help themselves in this situation, nor can we afford the costs of hiring pest control companies on our own. This forum post is my cry for help!

    [edited by moderator]

    CC: To Mr. [edited by moderator],

    Today [edited] I discovered a bed bug in my bathtub. I have been informed of a bed bug infestation in an apartment on the 7th floor above me about a month ago and the day I found out I immediately took preventative measures so that I don’t have problems with these pests should they enter my own dwelling. I sealed my mattress, box spring, and pillow in protective vinyl covers. I also rarely leave my apartment and no one comes into my apartment that lives in this building, so my only assumption is the bed bug travelled from one of the infested apartments. I called up a pest control company and they said they did a job here to remove bed bugs on the 6th floor, so now I know for certain they are migrating and looking for new hosts. This is a serious problem and thus far it has not been dealt with correctly. The mattresses that were thrown out, covered in bed bugs, were left sitting next to the back entrance for an entire weekend before they were removed. Beds, furniture, and anything else that is infested needs to be sealed in plastic and covered or else the bugs will simply migrate back inside and visit new apartments.

    I captured the bed bug in a jar and it is positively identified to be a bed bug. I live in a very clean environment and I take good care of my apartment, but I also discovered it costs $300 to hire a professional pest remover and have them spray to kill bugs. I am still unemployed and I have no means to afford this, and I believe that it is not only the tenants responsibilities to take preventative measures to prevent infestations, but it is the landlord’s responsibility to inspect and hire proper professionals to take care of the situation immediately before the bed bugs spread to every unit in this building. And they are spreading, the bug in my tub was absolute, undeniable proof that these insects are moving to new apartments. I know this can be a very expensive and time consuming endeavor, but I truly feel that it is the responsibility of the Housing Authority as well as the tenants to handle this problem together and not waste any more time letting the insects survive and multiply.

    Please respond to this letter within seven days. I would like to have my apartment be inspected and treated for a possible problem and I am willing to comply with anything I must to make all areas of my apartment accessible for being sprayed for bugs or merely inspected for a problem. I have already done everything I can afford to do, and it is not my fault that bed bugs are entering my home when I did not have them before this horrible event.

    Sincerely,
    [edited by moderator]

    From: [edited]
    To: [edited]

    Sent: [edited]
    Subject: RE: Bed Bugs spreading to other units

    First of all your allegations are not true as to the Authority not addressing this issue . Let’s address the mattress in question. I personally removed several mattress from the rear of the building within one hour of being informed of a potential problem. Second, at no time did any mattress stay in the exterior garbage area for the entire weekend. I then followed up with a general residents meeting( FOR ALL RESIDENTS ) about the laws pertaining to the Authority’s reasonability for so call bed bug problem. After a discussion on this topic I presents a HUD approved video about beg bugs . In closing , the Authority did proved additional information for all residents in our monthly newsletter about bed bugs.
    I do not recall you attending the meeting I held so to say I have not addressed the problem is truly a unfair statement.
    Please let this serve as my response to your e-mail as you requested.

    [edited]

    CC: To [edited]

    I would like to thank you for your timely reply and also for the information on NYS laws regarding bed bugs. I am aware that the Housing Authority has given out information and tried to inform people on the subject, which is in compliance to NYS law. However, giving out information alone is not enough in this particular situation. There are still live bed bugs in the building that can, in time, multiply and spread until every tenant has them in their apartment. Even the office downstairs is not immune, as I discovered in my research bed bugs can live anywhere from picture frames to wall moldings or in any tight crevices or upholstered items (office chairs, etc.) Theoretically, if let go for long enough, this entire building can become completely infested and even the Housing office workers stand the risk of bringing bed bugs to your own homes on your clothing or in your belongings.

    If possible, I would like to know in more detail what has been done to address this problem by the Housing Authority. Were any of the apartments adjacent to, above, below, and next to the infested apartment inspected to see if the bugs have spread? What sort of pest control actions were taken on the infested apartment or nearby units?

    If no action was taken other than the infested unit being treated, that is good but unfortunately insufficient to ensure that other tenants do not become infested with bed bugs. Finding one alive in my apartment was an eye-opener of how easy it is for these pests to spread and from my research and phone calls to the Board of Health, various Pest Control companies, and seeking legal information on NYS multiple dwelling laws, I can conclude that a bed bug infestation is something that needs to be dealt with by both the landlord and the tenants. Tenants have a responsibility to report the pests in their environment and do what they can to prevent an infestation, but landlords are also responsible, according to The warranty of habitability as codified in New York State under Real Property Law Section 235-b:

    Tenants have the right to reside in a comfortable, safe, and sanitary apartment. Landlords must provide heat and hot water on a regular basis. They also must control insect/pest infestation. If a landlord breaches this agreement, the tenant may sue for a rent reduction. The tenant may also withhold rent for recurring conditions, but in response, the landlord may sue the tenant for nonpayment of rent. In such a case, the tenant may counter sue for breach of the warranty. Any adverse condition caused by the tenant or other persons under the tenant’s direction or control does not constitute a breach of the warranty of habitability by the landlord. In such a case, it is the responsibility of the tenant to remedy the condition. Rent reductions may be ordered if a court finds that the landlord violated the warranty of habitability. The reduction is computed by subtracting from the actual rent, the estimated value of the apartment without the essential services. A landlord’s liability for damages may be limited when the failure to provide services is the result of circumstances beyond the landlord’s control. For example, a water main break or workers’ strike. In cases of emergency or neglect by the landlord, tenants may make necessary repairs and deduct the reasonable repair costs from rent when due. For example, when a landlord has been notified that a sink is leaking and willfully neglects to repair it, the tenant may hire a plumber and deduct the cost from the rent. Tenants should obtain receipts for the repairs and present them to the landlord along with a written explanation of the deduction from the rent.

    In my specific situation, I am not the source of the bed bug problem and have not had any negligence in keeping a clean household and being very careful about my living space. I pay my rent on time every month, I keep my apartment immaculately clean, and I am a very quiet and respectful tenant. Should I find more bed bugs entering my apartment, I will not give up on having something done to solve this problem. I will find out everything I possibly can and do my best to get the Housing Authority to take this issue more seriously and consider hiring a professional pest control company to come in, inspect all units near the source of the outbreak, and use the necessary pesticides to ensure all bed bugs are eradicated from this building. It is also the responsibility of other tenants here to report to you if they find bed bugs in their units, and I hope that if they do they will take action and not let the problem go unnoticed.

    Thank you for your time and please respond to my latest questions.

    Sincerely,
    [edited]

    There have been no reply e-mails since this but I sent a few more once I had more solid research under my belt and a few good resources.

    How to bed bug proof your NYC apartment
    by Teri Karush Rogers | 8/23/10 - 8:07 AM

    [Admin note: Full article deleted, click here to read it]

    Next article I e-mailed:

    How bed bugs spread through apartment buildings
    by Teri Karush Rogers | 2/08/10 - 5:47 AM

    [Admin note: full article deleted, click here to read]

    My final e-mail thus far pleading with Ed to do something:

    [edited]

    CC: To [edited],

    This will be my final e-mail for a while, unless I dig up more information, but I think I have covered most of the bases here in my argument as to why you need to have a pest company come in and deal with this bed bug issue, and yes, take responsibility.

    Taken directly from the NY branch of HUD's official website: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/states/new_york

    http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/library/hhi/NCHH_Bed_Bug_Control_2-12-10_final.pdf

    This PDF document details various scenarios with how HUD facilities have dealt with bed bug infestations in their buildings.

    It stresses the importance of the Management (you and the HUD staff here) working with the residents and PMPs (Pest Management Professionals). The goal is to create an IPM (Integrated Pest Management) approach to successfully eliminate the bed bugs from all of Stonequest (not just the suspected infested units) so that it does not manifest and spread (throughout this facility and to other facilities). I have already sent articles showing that bed bugs spread from one unit to the next, and every resource I find also states that landlords have a responsibility to treat the problem. There are even articles about HUD management trying to force tenants to foot the bill for pest control, and they were sued in court and the tenants won. No matter what "HUD laws" you tote to the residents here stating that this problem is entirely on us and not your responsibility beyond mere education, the real NYS laws all say otherwise when it comes to an issue of mass pest infestation. If we had roaches or rats infesting the entire building, that is no different than having bed bugs and that is HUD's responsibility to deal with that problem as stated by the Warranty of Habitability, which I also presented in another letter.

    It has been two months since that apartment was discovered to be infested, more are cropping up but people are afraid to report the bugs. That one article stated that within 41 months a good chunk of a multi-unit apartment building became infested because the bugs can simply walk in the hallways, go under the doors and set up in new homes. By not sending in the PMPs to inspect and treat all apartments near infested ones, above, below, adjacent, next to... the problem is going to escalate. The laundry room will become infested, the community room will become infested, your office will become infested. You have to do something NOW before this becomes a huge and very costly disaster. HUD will be footing that bill, not the low-income residents. I stand firm on informing you of this and if need-be, I will seek legal help to get you to take the correct action in this situation.

    Sincerely,
    [edited]

  2. EndOfMyRope

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 5:41:46
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    Good morning otaku1811,

    This is brilliant!!! Thank you so much for sharing this. I am disabled, and have a very limited income. I too have been dealing with a blatently ignorant and uncooperative landlord who, because he has no legal justification to evict me, is refusing to treat my apartment, thinking the bed bugs will just run me out.

    I would like to, with your expressed permission, of course, use some of the facts you so eloquently stated in my efforts to put together info about bed bugs, how easily they spread, and the dire, unavoidable consequences of not taking the problem seriously as well as not obtaining knowledgable effective pest control services immediately upon discovering there's a problem. I now have legal cousel, and believe this info will be very beneficial to have, as well as give to others who have asked me to educate them in preventing an infestation.

    So, would it be ok if I make some notes using your posts as references??

    Thanks again for sharing this.. I sincerely hope youre making progress.. Big kudos to you for kicking butt and taking names.. I know first hand the courage it takes to stand up and fight under these circumstances.. Please let me know how things are going

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 11:16:42
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    otaku1811.

    Please see your private messages!

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. otaku1811

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 14:16:54
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    Reply to EndOfMyRope: Sure, feel free to use any of this information if it can help. I for information on the laws at this link here: http://newyorkvsbedbugs.org/2009/07/13/bed-bugs-and-the-law-in-new-york-city/

    Of course this pertains to NY so if you're in another state you'll have to go digging for your state's particular laws. But I hope this helps!

    And to Nobugsonme: I don't know how to check PMs lol I'm still figuring out this site but I will look!

    After all those e-mails I finally got another reply back from Ed this morning:

    Subject: RE: HUD article on proper methods to control bed bug infestation in multi-family buildings
    From: [edited]
    To: e-mail omitted

    Date: [edited]

    Again, please read the laws pertaining to this problem. Our Authority has been addressing this so call issue since it has been brought to our attention. I am sorry if you feel differently. Again ,you are coming to some sort of unwarranted conclusions. I would suggest you may want to contact your congressperson and or senators asking for monies to address this so called problem or maybe ask that All Housing Authority are allow to increase the residents minimum rents to cover such cost.

    Please keep in mind we are all facing a major cut backs from the feds in funding. I would be glad to spend 100’s of thousands of dollars if HUD is will to fund us for everything the residents would like or deem they are entitled too .

    I would also like to know in your option when you feel the residents should take some sort of responsibility for their homes or problems they create? I know you have stated you do not leave your apartment much and you do not work, I would guess you would have the time to follow up with the folks in D.C. asking for their financial help with all of the problems we face running a public Housing Authority .

    Please read this month’s newsletter and I would hope you would take advantage of what the Authority is providing it’s residents.

    So now he's telling me to contact the White House and Congress? I guess I should. Someone has to do something about this! I also came up with an idea of printing out a one page info sheet asking all the tenants here to inspect their apartments for bed bugs and a simple checklist attached where they can check if they found bugs or not, since Housing won't send in anyone to inspect. All I can do is try to get the tenants to know what to look for and inspect themselves and check off their finds so I can gauge the size of the spread of these bugs and see how many units are currently infected. I also need to stress to them to report their findings to Housing but that won't do much good. I can only hope most of the tenants cooperate and check off if they have bugs or not.

  5. OhNoes

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 14:39:35
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    Albany Field Office

    52 Corporate Circle
    Albany, NY 12203-5121

    Phone: (518) 464-4200

    I suggest that you contact the HUD regional field office and Legal Aid. They may be able to provide you with some advice going forward.

    Legal Aid Soc. of Northeastern NY
    10-12 Lake Ave
    Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
    (528-587-5188)

    The attitude of the HA in this case is what I suspect most are. "It must be that you are poor and slovenly". I love the "we can't afford it" excuse.

  6. otaku1811

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 14:44:07
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    Thanks so much for that info! I will write it down!

  7. otaku1811

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Fri Sep 30 2011 14:57:22
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    Basically what that latest reply tells me is that they want to raise our rents (which no one here can afford) and that they aren't going to do anything, and we residents need to take care of this ourselves (with what money?)

  8. (deleted)

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    Fri Sep 30 2011 16:57:47
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    so how does this low income housing work? just how low is it?

    Cant you find an old (yet bug free) basement suite or apartment for like 400-600 bucks a month?

    Moderator: Moving is a highly risky proposition when facing bed bugs. There's no guarantee your next place is pest free. You could end up with a renewed infestation from your infested belongings in your new home. And what relevance is the amount of rent paid by the tenant?

  9. OhNoes

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    Fri Sep 30 2011 16:58:06
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    Your rents should be fine at this point. In any subsidized housing, rent will be based on income (or in public housing an alternative minimum rent). Federal regulations trump what some jagoff site manager wants to do.

  10. otaku1811

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    Fri Sep 30 2011 19:42:01
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    lefty2time - 2 hours ago  » 
    so how does this low income housing work? just how low is it?
    Cant you find an old (yet bug free) basement suite or apartment for like 400-600 bucks a month?

    Unfortunately I can't move. My rent is only $50 a month, heat and hot water and utilities included because I have no income. I am unemployed and haven't been able to find any permanent work in my town, it's only seasonal minimum wage service jobs here. I need to make $250 a month to live (necessities not included) but for rent, internet, phone, and car insurance. I survive however I can, selling my things on Craigslist, selling my beanie babies, and making art for people. Some months I make nothing at all. I am living at the bottom of the barrel of society here so 400-600 a month rent + utilities would be impossible for me at this point.

    I wound up this way because my mom died of cancer in 2009 and we lived in another unit of HUD, and they moved me into this building to rent our old home out to a family. So I am stuck right now and I already forked out $165 to buy bed bug preventative things to try and keep them out of my apartment, I don't have them YET aside from the one I found in my bath tub. It doesn't help that I also have a severe phobia of all insects and I have panic attacks if bugs are on or near me... This whole thing has caused me a lot of anxiety that I really don't need since I have to be constantly focused on my own survival. It kinda kills my creativity to make art and freelance when I have to worry about bugs invading my tiny 30x30 foot box studio apartment where everything I own is in bins and all in close proximity to my bed. I dunno what to do except keep writing and calling up people for information and to try and find anyone who can help.

  11. EndOfMyRope

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    Sat Oct 1 2011 5:59:43
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    Hello Otaku,

    Just a couple of things - first, to find your private messages (took me awhile too cus I do my internet stuff from my cell phone so it didnt show up on the screen) when you go on the main page, where the faqs and post it"messages are, look over to the right. Youll see a welcome message..under that, itll list your private messages..just click the link. Hope that helps

    Next, a million thanks for allowing me to use your posts as references. I sincerely appreciate it. I have been asked about how one can protect their homes/business from infestation and think it would be alot easier to have something put together - I may even share it with my neighbors since we have an extraordinarily ignorant landlord who hired an incompetent, uncommunicative pco. Thank you!

    Lastly, and perhaps, most importantly, I saw that your ordeal is preventing you from doing something you clearly love, creating art. Please, do all in your power to not let this happen, my friend. We ALL need to have something to redirect our thoughts and energy into in order to get through this nightmare with some degree of sanity intact. We need to be good to ourselves, make the time to do something we enjoy, that makes us feel good, and allows us to forger, even if only briefly. I can only imagine how difficult it is to try and achieve this without actually leaving home, but please keep trying. Dont allow those miserable critters to win by saxrificing your passion! take back that power, my friend. I wish you the best! Keep us posted, and feel free to pm me anytime ok

  12. otaku1811

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    EndofmyRope: Thanks so much for the tips and the kind words! I feel so physically and mentally exhausted after a whole week of dealing with this, and dealing with the anxiety and fear of having bugs infesting every crevice of everything I own in my tiny apartment. I took great pains to seal up everything I could, but it would be unrealistic and practically impossible to bug-proof everything (electronics, cookware, toiletries). Not to mention it makes it a huge hassle for me to get to anything if I have seal my belongings in plastic and tape. I definitely do need something to take my mind off of these things because I'm working myself into a total hysteria over them despite the fact my apartment (thus far) seems to be bug free.

    I think it's my overall feeling of helplessness in this situation that's doing me in and killing my focus to make art and do what I need to do to make money (cause I freelance so my entire livelihood rides on my absolute focus and creativity). There are only so many things I can do to seal off entry-points in my apartment and so many precautions I can take. It's the things I don't have control over that have me fearful, mainly the money situation and my inability to afford hiring a reputable pest control company, and also living with negligent and condescending Housing management that refuse to tackle this problem. And I have no where I can go, I can't afford to live anywhere else and I don't have any friends or family I can live with either, so I am stuck here watching the months go by as the infestation is likely spreading and growing.

    I also feel overwhelmed because I feel liek I am fighting this battle alone. No one else wants to complain to the Housing Authority or cause ripples, too many people are afraid of eviction and don't want to start anything. I myself would hate to have to withhold my rent, get an eviction notice, then drag them to court just to get them to hire exterminators. It's pretty extreme and if I get evicted, I will be homeless. That doesn't mean I won't raise hell though. I've called so many people, and am trying to get the community and the government of my town and even the country as a whole aware of how serious this is. It's a matter of getting people to care and making people realize this effects everyone, the entire town. They need to think of bed bugs like a plague on legs and maybe then they will care more lol

  13. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Sat Oct 1 2011 20:19:38
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    Hi otaku1811,

    I did read through the posts above. Have you contacted HUD directly (as opposed to the Housing Authority)?

    There was a case in Florida where a management company wanted tenants to pay for treatment, but HUD (who subsidized the rent) said no, it was not tenants' responsibility in HUD-supported rentals See this article on the blog.

    Hope that helps a little.

  14. otaku1811

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    I got the information to contact HUD, but I needed a mental breather day, so I haven't contacted them yet. I know I need to go above my Housing Authority's heads here and I really hope that HUD itself is more responsive about this issue. Thank you so much for the advice and the article, I will read it asap (gotta get my clothes out of the dryer first!)

  15. AshamedandScratching

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    Sat Oct 1 2011 21:12:22
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    Good job!

  16. otaku1811

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    Hi all, it's been a while since I wrote anything. I tried to take a breather and calm myself down because I know I need to live my life and stop being a paranoid, bug phobic mess 24/7. I got my interceptors and Diatomaceous earth int he mail and a week has gone by, so far all I found was a dead flour beetle (good riddance lol). I've done everything I can feasibly do without sealing my life in plastic at this point and for a while I was feeling pretty confident and worry-free, thinking I likely don't have bed bugs and the one I found in my tub fell in from the ceiling vent... one minor incident.

    However, two days ago I noticed a red spot on the top of my big toe. I thought, okay, could be anything... a pimple, ingrown hair... mosquito bite maybe. So it got my attention but I didn't worry about it. Today, however, I found another red mark on the same foot about two inches above the mark on my toe. Red flags are raising in my mind now. Then I found another one on the same foot behind my heel, and a few hours later while I was at the YMCA swimming I saw another red pimple-like dot on my other foot. The dots don't really itch per say, but I know it's not acne and they definitely seem more like bug bites. It seems highly suspicious because all four of these things just popped up all of a sudden within 3 days or so.

    Now I sit at the computer a lot, sometimes I am up until 5am, which would be bug feeding hours. It's possible they can be here near my desk somewhere and they bite when when I am on the computer. But I checked my bed again, still nothing and I have the bed covers, the interceptors, plus I spend most of my life at the computer so the bugs would come here more than they'd go to my bed (I would recon). I hope I am just overreacting and these 4 mysterious red bumps are just from a rogue mosquito in my apartment or some acne or something, but knowing my building's currently problem I am not ruling out bed bugs even though I have yet to see any or any signs of any.

    Perhaps my next plan of action is to use myself as bait to rule them out 100%. I know they don't feed every single day, but if I can rig up something around my computer chair to catch them somehow... then I'd have proof. They will come for me eventually if there are any here, and if these are bed bug bites they already got me >_> *sigh*

    Anyway that's my rant for the day, seriously hoping these marks are not bed bug bites. x.x

  17. Kwashington82

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    Thu Jan 12 2012 0:57:36
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    omg i live in East Orange NJ in a building for seniors and disabled people and in the building we have bed bug issues i keep my apt clean and neat but some how they find me ive had this problem for 3 months and i think its because ppl drag there bed bug infested furniture through the building spreading them we also dont have a freight elevator so they have to bring that infested furniture in the same elevator the tenants use i actually saw a bed bug crawling up the wall of the elevator i told the super and he said he would tell the managers i know i gotta move but right now i cant afford it

  18. P Bello

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    Thu Jan 12 2012 1:11:41
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    Dear kw,

    Is there a specific question you have?

    thanks ! pb

  19. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 12 2012 1:15:45
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    Kwashington,

    Sometimes in such a situation it can help to get the local press involved. The pressure of exposure and/or resulting involvement of local officials may help get things done.

    Moving is a difficult proposition even for those with funds, unless they have enough money to have everything they own treated en route, because it's not hard to move bed bugs.

  20. P Bello

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 12 2012 1:19:53
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    Perhaps the local pest control association might help.

    Sometimes there are professionals who are looking for training opportunities and others who may simply be looking for opportunities to give back to the community.

    Where is this situation located, what city & state?

    pb

  21. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Thu Jan 12 2012 1:37:33
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    P Bello - 16 minutes ago  » 
    Perhaps the local pest control association might help.
    Sometimes there are professionals who are looking for training opportunities and others who may simply be looking for opportunities to give back to the community.
    Where is this situation located, what city & state?
    pb

    Paul,

    Otaku, unless I read incorrectly, is in a HUD building in Saratoga Springs, and Kwashington is in disabled/senior housing in East Orange, NJ.

    This information is above.

  22. BedBugsRuinedMyLife

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Nov 9 2013 7:05:53
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    I myself live in a 5 story HUD building for elderly and disabled people in southern CA and my issue with the management's response to the bed bug problem here is the complete opposite of the usual complaints posted on this site complaining about how the management ignores the bug issues in HUD buildings. In my case the management is giving TOO MUCH attention to it while not being at all prepared to properly deal with with elderly/disabled tenants. It all started over 2 months ago when everyone living in the building got a notice on their doors from the management about needing to attend an urgent mandatory meeting the following day in the building's community room, which turned out to be about a huge infestation of bed bugs in the building, which was followed 3 days later by everyone getting a sudden knock on the door announcing that someone with a sniffer dog will be arriving 10 minutes later to inspect the units, way too short of a notice in my opinion, as many of the tenants here, myself included, have pets which of course have to be put somewhere safe before the dog's arrival. This was followed throughout the next 2 months by notices being placed on doors giving tenants and their pets no more than 24 hours (In many cases much less than that) to leave their units because of scheduled bed bug treatments. Now i know that the pest control company hired for this job (Orkin) gave the building's management their own notices which would of course given the management MUCH more time of knowing when a treatment 'session' for the building was scheduled than the management gave us. That short of a time given for people, especially the elderly and disabled to literally evacuate their units with their pets, not once but several times over that 2 month period... because of fu---ng BUGS, not a fire or other emergency, is just plain ridiculous and it showed the disgusting attitude towards the poor that many government employees have. Myself and many other tenants formed a group and PEACEFULLY marched on down to the local housing office to complain about the bungled way they were handling this issue and we were immediately threatened with eviction and of course given that all too familiar sermon inept government employees give their 'subjects' about how much money its costing and how grateful we should be they are doing anything at all about the bug problem. This has caused so much stress and anguish that i (And many others here as well) have been diagnosed with various physical ailments brought on by repeated psychological stress over such a long period of time. To people reading this post i warn you about moving into these HUD buildings, if any of you planned on doing so, as they are cheaply constructed, and your neighbor's problem will quickly become your problem too, whether it be bed bugs, cockroaches, the flu, e.t.c. and the management of these places as a general rule will treat you like sub-human shit.

  23. BedBugsRuinedMyLife

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Nov 9 2013 20:07:43
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    In fact these HUD owned buildings should all be shut down and Section 8 vouchers be used as a replacement, with more incentives given to landlords who participate in the Section 8 program. These buildings are in my opinion mismanaged and all to easily able to be infested with vermin, especially problematic now that most of the U.S. is overrun with bed bugs these days in addition to the usual pests like roaches, e.t.c. Bed bugs hitching a ride home with someone's "new" furniture from the Goodwill (The people in these buildings are so poor they certainly can't afford brand new stuff) is a real big problem, and it will affect the surrounding units shortly thereafter, leading to more nightmarish situations like the ones mentioned in the previous posts in short order.


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