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Bed bug breeding question

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  1. fedup

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Nov 21 2008 16:28:45
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    So I am trying to figure out when all the eggs on my stuff will have hatched. Since you can't kill eggs with pesticide, they all need to be hatched or killed with heat before I move. Now, I usually feel the bites from the adult bed bugs, and have a welt, but I've never noticed the younger ones. The last time I saw an adult or had a bite was a week ago.

    My question is, how long after feeding can a bug still lay eggs, and how big does it have to be to lay eggs? As I understand it the eggs hatch in 7-10 days, so if I actually do have all the breeders gone then all the nymphs should be vulnerable this weekend.

  2. spideyjg

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Nov 21 2008 16:40:29
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    Adult females can lay eggs for up to 21 days after a feeding.

    Jim

  3. terry glasson

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Nov 21 2008 19:14:22
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    Might need to be careful about hatching times. I have seen reports of up to 12 days and it seems reliant on the temperature. As it takes a while to reach adult/ laying age, I would allow a little extra to be sure.

  4. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 13:23:12
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    Does this mean a female can lay 3-5 eggs a day everyday for up to 21 days after a feeding? I encountered many at a motel 2 months ago and am now certain I brought some home. Just trying to figure out how bad the infestation might be now.

  5. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 19:12:50
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    Yes that is correct, but as Terry indicated earlier their activity is highly dependent on the ambient temperature of the room.

    At lower temps the activity slows down & lifespan durations are much longer, for example consider that at 50 degrees adult bedbugs have lived for up to 536 days in captivity without a blood meal, but that lifespan shortens down to 32 days at 97 degrees F to give you some comparison for the effect of temperature on bed bug activity.

    Let me paraphrase sometime Micheal Potter said at a conference....Central heating was the best thing that that ever happened for bed bugs....provides favorable temps for development year around.

    Good luck

  6. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 19:49:26
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    So, if I understand correctly, they thrive and/or survive better in cooler temperatures. I can't heat my room to quite 97, but being in the basement it is quite cold down there, especially in Canadian winter. Also, do you or does anyone else know if they need to be inseminated only once or always before each time they lay eggs?

  7. poorbabies

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 19:54:17
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    Im lost so there is more activity in the cold temperature?

  8. terry glasson

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 19:54:21
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    The female adult BB mates once which is damaging to her but then, after a blood meal, can lay 2-3 eggs everyday for five weeks. Colder climes slow their development but warmer ones increase the activity, feeding breeding etc, so I wouldn't crank the heat up.

  9. hkbugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 20:02:26
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    OMG thanks for this advice. I've been keeping my heat way up thinking it would make the eggs hatch sooner so that the nymphs would be affected by the PCO's poison while it was still fresh.

  10. bbdk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 20:20:43
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    terry glasson - 25 minutes ago  » 
    The female adult BB mates once which is damaging to her but then, after a blood meal, can lay 2-3 eggs everyday for five weeks. Colder climes slow their development but warmer ones increase the activity, feeding breeding etc, so I wouldn't crank the heat up.

    However, if a PCO has laid down residuals, a higher temperature would force them to transverse the pesticide regions more frequently, hopefully to die before the residuals dissipate.

    Likewise, higher feeding frequency would make them more active, and likely to cross DE if that is laid down.

    From the sounds of it, higher temperatures would generally speed up the extermination process. So there are arguments both way for what temperature is preferred.

  11. bait

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Wed Dec 3 2008 22:00:16
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    It's counterintuitive. Colder temps allow them to live (state of hibernation) longer. But they are more vicious at highter temps because they feed on a faster cycle, which allows them to mature faster and therefore die sooner. They become breeding adults based on the number of times they shed the exoskeleton.

    I don't know if temps affect the development of the egg. Does anyone know if they hatch in colder climes?

  12. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Dec 6 2008 18:50:12
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    My house was just sprayed today, so I have a heater on high in my cold basement bedroom in hopes that any newly laid eggs will hatch soon while the residual spray is still strong. Hopefully the heat doesn't dry up the spray though. If anyone knows that having the heat on is a bad idea, let me know. Thanks.

  13. bbdk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Dec 6 2008 21:30:58
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    Hmmm... now that I think about it, the high heat would also likely have an impact on the speed of dissipation for the residual effect. There would have to be some pretty detailed math done to figure out what the ideal temperature is.

  14. terry glasson

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Dec 6 2008 21:56:52
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    I use a powder in suspension so heat will have no adverse effects, however, though this is said to be residual it is very quickly ineffective on carpets and bed upholstery, possibly because of absorption issues, so you would have to define the pesticide in use. I believe either extreme of temperature would be detrimental to treatment.

  15. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 2:14:07
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    I have another question. If one pregnant female or one male and one female (both adults) are introduced to a new place, how bad would an infestation likely get after 2 months with only one person to feed on? 50-100?

  16. terry glasson

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 7:02:33
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    I would think more than 100 but its all a bit mathmatical

  17. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 10:48:30
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    terry glasson - 1 week ago  » 
    The female adult BB mates once which is damaging to her but then, after a blood meal, can lay 2-3 eggs everyday for five weeks. Colder climes slow their development but warmer ones increase the activity, feeding breeding etc, so I wouldn't crank the heat up.

    Do you mean the female mates only ONCE her entire life and can lay eggs from that one mating for the rest of her life? I know that it's damaging for her to mate, but I didn't realize that she doesn't mate again, say 2 or 3 months, after the first time. OMG, these things are truly from another planet!

  18. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 10:59:40
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    Hi,

    Bed bugs breed using a process called traumatic insemination. It is believed that they can mate 4 or 5 times in a lifetime but have the ability to continue to lay eggs for a while after mating.

    I am not sure if we can claim that the current outbreak of bed bugs is extra terrestrial in origin, I have not seen many infected people with grey skin and a passion for Elvis but it could have slipped my attention.

    David

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bedbug infestations in domestic and commercial settings. The patent numbers are GB2463953 and GB2470307.

    "Astral Entomologist - because so many people say my ideas are out of this world"
  19. MyWorstFear

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 14:58:03
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    David, I'm not sure about the grey skin, but if you want to see people with a passion for Elvis, just come to the USA. Elvis even has his own channel on satellite radio! I'm more of a Stones girl, so I don't listen.

  20. lynnee82

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Thu Dec 11 2008 17:04:12
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    So, to summarize, is it better to have the heat on between 70-75 F to get the bb's to be active and cross the pesticide and DE?

  21. terry glasson

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Fri Dec 12 2008 6:27:58
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    140 degrees and kill the little *********would be best but, yes, too cold and they can go dormant (which could be somewhere inaccessable). Normal temps to keep them acting normally allows you to treat effectively and optimally.

  22. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Dec 20 2008 13:56:49
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    So only adult females can breed right? I'm guessing by the amount of bites I am getting each week that some bugs have been killed off from the last treatment. I am yet to actually see a bug or find much that suggests a heavy infestation. After 10 weeks there should be about 100+ bugs, but its hard to believe there are that many without seeing any signs. I have found hard black specks of something on my white sheets that may be feces. My mattress and box spring have been covered with the aller-zip covers so hopefully a bunch are now trapped and on their way to a slow death, but it seems as though at least one other bed in the house is now infested. And now my dads girlfriend think she might have brought one/some home (his is the other infested bed). If only pregnant adult females can lay eggs, I can feel slightly more positive, but how does the male know whether the female is old enough to impregnate? Does anyone know if its possible for females in their third or fourth stage of molting to be impregnated? Do their reproductive parts only work once adults? And do pregnant females still feed or feed more often (for nourishment) while they lay eggs for the three or more weeks? Any answers along these lines from and expert would be appreciated. Thanks.

  23. F@ Bed Bugs

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sat Dec 20 2008 14:03:27
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    aaron - 1 week ago  » 
    one of the worst things about them is they can live 12 months between feedings...
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    Vaughn Pest Control - Dayton and Cincy areas

    I believe on average bed bugs don't live too much longer than a year though. And I believe nymphs can only survive a couple months without eating. Do bed bugs die faster if they eat more often or is it irrelevant?

  24. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 5 years ago
    Sun Dec 21 2008 0:09:11
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    F@ Bed Bugs

    I sent you a PM with a link to some reference materials about bed bug reproduction


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