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Bed Bug Behavior

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  1. SleeplessJuneBug

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Aug 10 2017 14:25:37
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    On each of my bed bug hunts since the beginning of this (beginning of June), most of the bugs I have found have been motionless, yet clinging onto a vertical surface.

    For example: After our third treatment, I found two bedbugs at the corner of the ceiling in broad daylight, not moving. Is this because it is daytime, so they are just that inactive? Or is it a result of the pesticide slowly killing them? Can they cling to a wall like that as they are dying?
    I have found several stuck to the EXPOSED side of the mattress- not under the sheets or in the usual cracks during the day as well (treated with phantom). They don't attempt to move when I shine my flashlight on them, and then I've been using a q-tip with rubbing alcohol to pick them up and either flush/bag for samples.

    My PCO has been baffled by this. He says the locations themselves are odd and that most of the bedbugs he sees in the field are "very lively" and I'm wondering if it is a sign of a larger infestation for me to be finding them in these locations, or a sign that they were sick , or if this is normal?

    Thanks!

  2. loubugs

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Aug 10 2017 14:40:12
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    Too bad you can't post a picture of them in their strange positions. This behavior was only evident post application? Could be insecticide reaction but not sure.

    Professional entomologist/arachnologist. I consult on all matters dealing with insects and arachnids, including those of natural history and biology to pest management and forensic entomology investigations.
  3. SleeplessJuneBug

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Aug 10 2017 14:51:08
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    loubugs - 4 minutes ago  » 
    Too bad you can't post a picture of them in their strange positions. This behavior was only evident post application? Could be insecticide reaction but not sure.

    Yes, I agree, pictures would have been nice. I have gotten better, but my reaction upon finding one is usually a string of expletives and then "DIE!DIE!DIE!" . It took me a couple of weeks to become composed enough to think of bagging some for ID when I found one. As far as I can tell, this has only been post treatment. I usually find them almost exactly a week after the treatment with phantom. It's like they were crawling to a better hiding place and just stopped in their tracks..
    The one at the ceiling I spotted from across the room!

  4. loubugs

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Aug 10 2017 15:27:38
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    SleeplessJuneBug - 33 minutes ago  » 

    loubugs - 4 minutes ago  » 
    Too bad you can't post a picture of them in their strange positions. This behavior was only evident post application? Could be insecticide reaction but not sure.

    Yes, I agree, pictures would have been nice. I have gotten better, but my reaction upon finding one is usually a string of expletives and then "DIE!DIE!DIE!" . It took me a couple of weeks to become composed enough to think of bagging some for ID when I found one. As far as I can tell, this has only been post treatment. I usually find them almost exactly a week after the treatment with phantom. It's like they were crawling to a better hiding place and just stopped in their tracks..
    The one at the ceiling I spotted from across the room!

    Of course, this makes sense for their behavior. I forgot to comment earlier. Phantom (chlorfenapyr, active ingredient) does not kill directly. The action is from metabolizing it, so this takes a little time. Your PCO should be aware of this behavior/product association.
    From Wikipedia:
    Chlorfenapyr is a pesticide, and specifically a pro-insecticide (meaning it is metabolized into an active insecticide after entering the host), derived from a class of microbially produced compounds known as halogenated pyrroles. Chlorfenapyr works by disrupting the production of adenosine triphosphate, specifically, "Oxidative removal of the N-ethoxymethyl group of chlorfenapyr by mixed function oxidases forms the compound CL 303268. CL 303268 uncouples oxidative phosphorylation at the mitochondria, resulting in disruption of production of ATP, cellular death, and ultimately organism mortality."

  5. SleeplessJuneBug

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    Posted 1 week ago
    Thu Aug 10 2017 15:54:18
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    Whoaaa halts ATP production? Nice!
    From my experience with this particular PCO, he seems fairly new. Their boss seems more knowledgeable but is extremely hard to get a hold of. The young guy seemed thrown off when I asked which chemical(s) they were using, like he was unprepared to talk much more about it.

    Thanks!


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