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BB Sensory Perception

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  1. bbFirstTimer

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Jul 17 2013 15:08:50
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    So I was contemplating this topic last night. I wonder if we have not fully examined the full range of sensory perception in bed bugs. We know they can sense heat and CO2. Ive witnessed them react to a finger hovering a few inches from them ready to squish them. Presumably they feel air vibrations. They have a circadian rhythm so time is a bit of a concept.

    Can they see? They have eyes so I assume some rudimentary perception of dark and light is at least possible. But I wonder... Since they can sense heat is it that they can feel it like we do or is it that maybe they are able to see in a different light spectrum like bees and other insects do? Has anyone ever researched this? They are predominantly nocturnal so human perceived light range is sort of null for needing of detection.

    With the bugs that seem to acknowledge my finger slowly closing in on their bodies, could this be sight related, vibration of air particles, smell, sound? Can they hear? Do they smell? They most likely can smell or is it that they detect our position through a more crude interpretation of chemical receptors that pick up a few trace molecules like CO2? They can detect pesticides. Is it some other insect sense that allows this?

    What do their antenna do? Simply close range physical detection? Chemical reception? Taste?

    I think of all this considering current passive traps. I could care less if some other monetarily endowed individual takes these ideas and capitalizes on them. It would at least be for the better of our society, or comfort that is. Should we be attempting to replicate the human body and sleep patterns more with current trap technologies?

    I think there should be not only CO2 release but that it should be heated to human breath levels. I wonder if emitting heat over a 2 - 3 foot area at human dissipation levels would be effective. Likewise can we emulate human scents? Do they even care about that? Simulate human motion or sound from sleep? Do they even care about that? Are all passive traps 100% on all the time? Why not time them to work within the circadian rhythm of the bugs? If they react to light why not emit light? Simulate human skin at the light reflective levels. Humidity and saline levels of human skin might be something to look into. I can't imagine a creature that must regulate hydration levels not being able to detect temperature and humidity levels.

    I got on this thinking about how the traps are rather inconsistently reliable. Some catch many some people place and never catch one. There is an obvious difference between a trap and a host. We can see it and it seems the bugs can too.

    I'm actually a little curious about what other things allow these bugs to hone in on us. I doubt that if I had a half full paintball CO2 tank slowly seeping gas in a gym bag next to the heater or in the sun from the window the bugs would swarm it. A room temp glass of soda in the sunlight from a window? Or a bottle of soda left in the car then brought into the bedroom? I mean to say CO2 and heat cant be the only attractors.

  2. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Jul 17 2013 15:59:08
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    Hi,

    Much of what you are thinking has already been done although a lot of it is "old" science in terms of what is terms electrophysiology (connecting sensing organs to electrodes to see what induces a signal).

    I will write more when I am not up the side of a mountain but in short the summary is:

    The initial cue to hunt is CO2 which is sensed by pits on the legs which gives the direction finding ability. Closer to prey they use "vision" in the infra red end of the spectrum to locate the warmth of exposed skin.

    Now for the bad news, they don't have a circadian rhythm they adapt to the availability of food and that is the influencer, they are not nocturnal they are obligate haematophages so again adapt to food.

    You also need to sure up your understanding of active and passive devices. If it uses heat or CO2 or another lure then its an active. Having tried many of them I find that CO2 is the most critical lure, other attractants are just not as vital as some would have us believe. Passive devices have no lure built in or produced by the device but in the case of interception devices to trap bedbugs as they come towards a bed or chair the human is the lure or active element.

    In short its an area I have dabbled with since about 2007 and its a lot more complex than it initial appears as what works in a lab or arena will not always give the same results in the field and frankly if you want a few of the $1,000 computer controlled units to play with make me an offer because they are just sitting on my shelf gathering dust as not as effective as they promised they would be.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  3. bbFirstTimer

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Jul 17 2013 16:12:29
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    Ah thanks for the response and clarification.

    Also do you mean to say those $1k machines are probably as potentially effective as a warm bottle of soda at attracting the bugs in the real world? Lol I find it a bit comical if that's the case.

  4. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 4 years ago
    Wed Jul 17 2013 16:21:09
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    Hi,

    No a few years ago the "hot" products were expenses plug in devices that produced CO2 from cylinders, heat and used chemical lures. One went bust and one got shut down from the US by the EPA.

    I will have two of them and they are designed to be your alternative human.

    I suspect they will work slightly better than your bottle of soda and significantly worse than the bedbug Beacon in the Active class of products.

    David


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