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any other bugs that resemble bedbugs?

(6 posts)
  1. jub976

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 6 2007 13:08:25
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    ok, one more question:
    are there any other types of bugs that start out small and white/clear and grow to be large and brownish?

    i've been trying to do independent research and haven't found anything. thanks!

  2. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 6 2007 13:56:06
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    jub ... There are many!
    An unfed baby spider (to the naked eye) looks quite similar to an unfed baby bed bug. This is in the same manner that all new born human babies sort of look alike.

    Bugs are not so far removed, biologically speaking, from humans. They are very different--but I say, why not focuses on the similarities to find out where some of their achillees heals are.

    They are human specific parasites.

    Then too--focus on the differences between us, and them:

    i.e. "cold blooded" and "invertebrates" and "true bugs".

    This way—you can find out even more flaws in their survival and their flourishing rates in your environment(s).

    As well … get the knowledgeable PCO in--ASAP

    Yesterday ... I saw a bug walking across the restaurant table I was sitting at! It was too large to be an unfed nymph bed bug--but it looked like a very pale yellow green--almost white colored sesame seed shaped bug. It was almost 3x's bigger than a first in star Bed bug nymph. Since it was completely translucent I knew, right away, it was no bed bug. If your friend has them and your sure you have them jub--it is best to focus only on the Bed bug for right now. They shed the skins (molt) after a blood meal and then they grow darker, more reddish brown, over time. They do this six times before becoming and adult that can breed. This can take 4-6 weeks (approximately.) But there is a lot more to know about bed bugs FIRST.

    Again, Life cycle FAQ on main blog page. Seems your hoping against all hopes. What you posted earlier seems to be where you should focus your attention. Really--best wishes ... and find out all about bed bugs. On-line encyclopedias Google "Cimex lectularius" "bed bug" Check the research sites not just dictionaries.
    The spelling is correct here! "Cimex lectularius

    Best to you!

    Willow

  3. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Mon Aug 6 2007 14:32:01
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    JUb,
    You need to put some of your bugs on a piece of clear packing tape and tape it to an index card. The PCO will want to see samples.
    But I have to say, if you traveled with a friend who had bed bugs (in her car) and then came home to find three bugs crawling on you, there's a good chance that's what they are. Go on bedbugger.com and click on "Lou Sorkin's photos" in the sidebar links to photos and video. He has many life stages and fed/unfed, so you can compare your bug.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  4. jub976

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Aug 7 2007 9:38:25
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    i was definitely hoping against all hope, but i think i am out of the denial stage now. we saved a bunch of the ones we found. and hopefully the PCO will be in today.

    thanks again!

  5. lieutenantdan

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Aug 7 2007 11:09:49
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    jub976,
    My opinion is if you have enough samples show not only your PCO but get another opinion. Harvard University will check them for a $20.00 fee. Have Harvard email you the results. Time is important in the war. These things lay eggs that chemicals will not kill and in no time at all your infestation can grow which then of course makes your war more difficult.

  6. willow-the-wisp

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    Posted 7 years ago
    Tue Aug 7 2007 13:46:15
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    hi jub, glad you're "out of denial" many of us go thru this ... it took me finding 4 or 5 bugs before I finally came out of denial--it took me about 3-4 days.
    Then there were layers of learning for me to do--also sort of like coming out of denial or more like a light switch would come on in my head.

    Jub, from your description, it sounds like a new infestation, however.... if you and friends were in close contact for some time while they had bugs and knew it or didn't know it--Dan is right about the eggs.
    Either way, if there is even only a few eggs in your abode ... (and the females lay about 3-7 daily), since they won't hatch for 10-14 days after being laid.

    Saying that, I say ... you will still likely need a second treatment.

    Just so you'll be prepared for that and so that the property owner understands the reasoning. Often they only want to pay for one treatment. But, as you can see--this rarely ever does it. We used to kick some percents around here, months ago ... I THINK it was 11% or 12% were cleared with just one treatment.
    Not too hopeful.

    If you got lucky--all the bugs you picked up were either not yet adults or somehow sterile from treatments the friend did—or--you caught them all before they bit and had time to lay any eggs. They can't lay eggs if not fed for about a month, so, it would be good to find out how long your friend had infested stuff in the trunk.

    Are there any signs from any family members at all--that they had, indeed, been bitten?
    (of course not all people react to the bites so you can’t say 100%.) if so—those rooms where they slept are MORE likely to have eggs in them somewhere. d
    But if there are signs and a full night passed
    Then perhaps there may be some eggs. Depends upon how starved the bugs that you picked up were. If they were so starved (like for a month) they rarely use the first blood meal to lay eggs, right away. I know this from one bug I had direct experience with. She did not lay eggs until about 5 days after I caught her—and it took 2 bites for this to occur. She was very starved—I am saying I hope most Bed bugs will react like that when starved—but I’m not totally sure, so, in part, this is speculation.

    Hungry bed bugs like what you describe WILL come out in the day--I hope and I do pray that you did get them all and that nobody was bitten!

    It was so smart for you to have sterilized EVERYTHING that might have encountered the stuff/bugs from the trunk. I hope it was enough and that it worked!
    Therefore, I will end on an encouraging note.
    It was only one night that passed—if you got them all. PCO ASAP will make it a shorter process if some were missed—also highly possible.
    Take care!

    Willow


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