Got Bed Bugs? Bedbugger Forums » Tools/ideas for fighting bed bugs

another question on tools... Flashlight!

(17 posts)
  1. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Dec 5 2007 17:50:52
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    Anybody here have a recommendation on a good but reasonably priced flashlight? I asked my PCO about his, but it's $100! Are leds the way to go? Are most leds the same, and is the strength of the light dependent on the # of leds?

  2. currentinsomniac

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Dec 5 2007 18:00:26
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    Depends on what you want to use the flashlight for. Looking for BB hiding spots? Or trying to catch them in action at night? I personally think LEDs are good and bright (and you can find good ones for a lot less than $100). I don't have recommendations however, because I just have some no-name brand we got as a present a few years back).
    However, if you want to try and catch them at night when you feel them crawling on you, try a red led light. Another thread talks about how the red doesn't seem to freak them out as much.

  3. cosbear

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Dec 5 2007 18:16:33
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    Howdy: I had not heard the red LED one until just the last day or two but it sounds like a good idea. My pco had a nice aluminum one that might have been a maglite, it had a lens that you change in increments from a less light wide beam, to a pinpoint very bright light. It was a long narrow penlight type probably three AA batteries. Later... cos

  4. DougSummersMS

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Wed Dec 5 2007 20:54:36
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    I found a 16 LED 3 AAA battery flashlight made by Garrity at Walmart for $14.99. It is about six inches long with two interchangeable lenses (blue & red) in an aluminum body & has a nylon case.

    You can also buy some single red LED keychain lights for about $5.00

    I have seen 40 & 100 LED flashlights in a catalog for $30 -$40, if you need a bright light.

    I also have a 4D cell Mag-light with a super bright halogen bulb that I purchased for about $40. The $100 model has rechargeable batteries & a charger.

  5. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 3:58:40
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    Thank all of you for the tips!

  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 7:08:06
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    I use bright 8 LED bright white head torches. Its better to have hands free when screening for bed bugs.

    I have used a variety of them over the years and to be honest I tend to just pick them up from the local hardware store at about £10 - £15 which I have listed in Sterling because the exchange rate is so bad they would appear expensive in USD.

    David

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  7. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 13:07:16
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    Flashlights one of my favorite topics as I must have well over twenty and now with
    the holidays upon us probably at least 2 more. I am someone who has used flashlights as a professional for different applications for over twenty years. In terms of inspections I am someone who with the exception of tripping hazards asks for the lights to be turned off for an inspection/search. I also know that a flashlight is a survival tool as one of the first things to go in most emergency situations is the power which goes bulb in hand with the lights. If you can't see you can't get out.
    First off I must say that I am not a big fan of led for most applications as they are either too bright, too wide or not spot friendly. Beware of many of the high intensity pocket lights as they burn batteries. As for rechargeable s they can be good but have a back up as when you need it most they go out. And when a rechargeable goes out they don't give much warning.
    As for pocket lights that work well for general purpose I like
    1. Pelican Mitylite 2AAA (Little cousin to the Sabrelite)
    2. Coast LED Lenser (good bright white with helpful blue,red and green) Yes it's LED.

    My most recent acquisition is the Streamlight sidewinder (offers a unique infrared option)

    As for bed bug inspection I recommend an interesting tool from Radio Shack which gives you an LED prefocused light with a fixed 2X magnifying glass ideal for bed bug searches.
    They call it the Rim-Free Lighted 2x Magnifier.

    As for working lights Mag or Streamlight with xenon bulbs with an extra
    in the cap. Don't get odd number of batteries as you always have an extra
    one that ends up being stale by the time you need to replace the other two or four.
    Don't get flashlights with special batteries or specialty company specific bulbs,
    you'll be sorry. And remember there's a light on over at the Frankenstein place.

  8. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 13:42:30
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    NotSoSnug started this off with his bed bug hunting activities--if you remember, he was using a red LED bike light. NotSoSnug said the red light did not disturb them as the normal white did, so he could catch them in the act.

    I started and run the site but am "not an expert."
  9. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 13:56:00
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    Red works better for most creatures of the night cimex included. Betty Faber used to watch her roaches that way but but they pick you up quicker, cerci.
    Blue or UV also work well but if you use a lot of UV get the safety glasses just like on CSI.

  10. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 14:32:57
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    Wow - this is all such great information! Didn't get the Frankenstein reference, though... I'll be getting one of those 8 led head torches. I did get the 2x illuminated magnifier from Radio Shack - and they've lowered the price to about $11! I also found a nifty 10x "flashlight magnifier" at Edmund Scientific - love it! It was $20 & they were offering free shipping w/a pop-up add when I went to their site. All this tool acquisition is counter to my de-cluttering mode, however...

    3 Questions:
    - What is the IR for??? And what are the other applications for the blue & UV?
    - From what I gather, an actual red led & a red lens are equally effective for night-stalking???
    - There's something about the led light that seems to give me eye-strain or the impression that I just can't see the tiny things as well as with bulbs - any thoughts on this?

  11. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 19:19:05
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    IR if you happen to have enough money for a night scope.
    UV lets you see things (with training) that you don't want
    to see like rodent urineand other fluids.
    The thing about red light is that it doesn't give a lot of light
    although led is better than filters I think.
    Whats good about the Streamlight Sidewinder is that it has three
    intensity levels for each light not to mention strobe for the times
    you want to listen to Steppenwolf or land a helicopter. Blue led offers more and a bit surreal light that I find works well for me some of this is personal visual
    parameters. As far as "Over at the Frankenstien place" so one please help, pleasehelp.

  12. Nobugsonme

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Thu Dec 6 2007 22:46:35
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    LOL, Winston. Thanks for bringing your sense of humor as well as your know-how to the forums!

  13. pleasehelp

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Fri Dec 7 2007 17:04:20
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    WinstonO, you've exceeded my flashlight expertise expectations...Thanks!

  14. NotSoSnug

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 0:01:33
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    I used a red LED bike light and caught 50 bugs in one week post treatment. (See my Flickr post.) The red light didn't scare them as much. I would say that movement scared them more than the red LED. To catch those 50 I was sleeping within 7 feet of all places on the harborage and could see all external surfaces and reach them if I was stealthy and patient.

    As NoBugs has noted, this requires some sleep deprivation. But those first few weks I wasn't sleeping very well anyway, so this gave me something to feel some control over. Now, 3.5 weeks post treatment, and with no visible activity for 2.5 weeks, I am getting about 3 hours continuous sleep before I wake up and scan. Yup, still scanning...

  15. doormat4

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 8:28:28
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    notSoSnug;
    thanks for sharing your tactics on your war with BB's. Info like the red light effect can help in the study of these bugs. Here is replys I got from 2 entomologists in the past.

    My question would be for an entomologist
    to check out. Would it be possible to see nymphs any easier with the
    use of a blacklight? Or even make the eggs stand out more easily? I
    know with many folks eyesight decreasing over the years as mine
    are,anything that would enhance our ability to see something the size
    of a speck of dirt, could help. Also are there any colors in the light
    spectrum, that would have any effect good or bad on BB's? I'm just
    thinking outloud if something like this, would be of any benefit to
    help those faced with infestations or as a method of spotting a
    hitchhiker.

    email reply from Lou
    Nov 12, 2007 6:43 AM
    subject Re: visible or not?

    Hi Bruce,
    I was going to look into UV since many if not all pest control people should have a blacklight for inspections. Some have said that they show up better under UV. It might be sheds or hatched eggs that fluoresce best, but not sure at this time.
    I don't know of any studies on various light wavelengths and relation to making them stand out better during inspections.

    http://www.thebedbugresource.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=683&sid=9e0d1d7113d2c1d505a65c7d40cf7030

    Anythink that people find that helps in this battle with BB's, will help all of us in the long run. Especially when there is so much uncertantity, at this time. And some things shared, no matter how insignificent it may seem, could help the pros discover answers quicker for dealing with the BB battle.

  16. Winston O. Buggy

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    Posted 10 years ago
    Sat Dec 8 2007 12:07:21
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    UV lights tend to sharpen the image especially in shadowed areas like hotel rooms and around beds. While BB do not fluorese like scorpions it still helps good blue LED
    can be similar. But a decent UV flashlight is around $70. And if you use it alot
    and certainly if you use a plug in or high powered unit you need protective glasses.
    Also you should consider using a probe, dental pick, tooth pick or a SBBDD
    (Sorkin Bed Bug Detection Device) a.k.a. a NYC Metro Card.
    Remember whether Red White or Blue you have to look for what's biting you.
    (OMG did he write that?)

  17. spideyjg

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    Posted 9 years ago
    Mon Jul 21 2008 2:10:45
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    Best thing I found to use in the BB war in the light regard is a Coast Model: 1065 dual color headlamp. Found one at Costco for $20.

    It has a pretty bright white LED set for working under stuff caulking or anything while leaving your hands free and has a single red LED to go hunting with and have both hands free for some two fisted bug bashing.

    Jim


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