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An experiment in perception

(21 posts)
  1. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 15:39:01
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    Hi,

    I sometimes talk about the finer details of the world or an image and how after years of looking at the world one square inch at a time you start to perceive things in more detail.

    The image below is one I took on Sunday while out. I would like to encourage people to look at it and to spend a few seconds or minutes writing about the detail that you see. I am not asking people to study the image intensely for a few minutes but to just glace at it for a second or two and then write.

    Once we have a few I will write a description of what I pick out and what I see when I glace at that image for a second or less.
    IMG_9519 by bedbugscouk, on Flickr

    There is no right or wrong answers or input to this exercise and it should not take you very long to do.

    Thanks in advance.

    David Cain
    Bed Bugs Limited

    More plant and flower images here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bedbugsuk/sets/72157645271571137/

    If you have found this information helpful please consider leaving feedback on social media via google+ or FaceBook or by like/loving the images.

    In accordance with the AUP and FTC (legal requirements) I openly disclose my vested interest in Passive Monitors as the inventor and patent holder. Since 2009 they have become an integral part in how we resolve bed bug infestations. I also have a professional relationship with PackTite in that they distribute my product under their own branding. I do not however receive any financial remuneration for any comments I make about products.
  2. Kater

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 16:00:27
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    I see a leaf, lying in grass, with some fungus related damage and a little black dot on the stem part ...

  3. AbsolutelyFreaking

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 16:20:59
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    I see a dead brown(ish) leaf lying in (and contrasting intensely with) vivid green grass. It makes me think of autumn and the changing seasons except the grass is too green and the leaf it too brown . . . which then makes me focus on the "spots" and missing pieces on the leaf . . . which then makes me think the leaf has an "illness" or has been ravished by bugs/insects . . . or both.

  4. Daylight

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 16:46:59
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    I saw a fawn colored object reminding me of a baby animal, lying in the grass alone, which turned into a freshly fallen leaf, somewhat intact and strong.

  5. BigDummy

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 16:53:04
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    I see a walrus, on a sailboat, eating a peanut butter and marshmallow sandwich, without a napkin, somewhere in the southeast, early spring I'd guess.

    HVAC/Locksmith/Bed Bug Control for a non-profit homeless shelter and long term veteran housing.
  6. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 17:07:47
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    Hi BigDummy,

    When we meet remind me to show you Usinger's meets Rosharch.

    I was hoping for less abstract a response but they are all equally valid and start to show a few of te patterns.

    Please add something if you read this thread, there is no correct answer but the more answers the more accurate the exercise.

    David

  7. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 22:26:07
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    I see a single brown leaf in the grass. The lower left part of the leave looks blurry to me: it might be the way the light bounces off of it. But, it seems softer, rounder. The grass is almost transparent due to the angle of the camera and light, with a similar impact on the leaf in the forefront of the picture...

    Although my eyes may not be what they once were

    They
    Are
    Out
    There
    = TAOT
  8. cilecto

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Mon Sep 29 2014 22:48:49
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    Leaf. Grass. Come on, there's gotta be a bed bug there, somewhere.

    Thou shalt not be afraid for the terror by night...
    - Psalms 91:5-7

    (Not an pro)
  9. maltmom

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 3:16:14
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    I see the coolness of the green grass and the crispness of the dried leaf. It brings me back to the time of my childhood when I actually took the time to absorb the sensation of the textures of nature as I dug my bare toes into the grass and crumpled the leaf between my fingers. Also, the coolness of the grass giving birth to the excitement and the anticipation of cool weather that was soon to come and replace the 100% humidity. Then, carelessly throwing myself down onto the grass, stretching out on my back and taking in the sky and searching for the animals and shapes I would surely find in the clouds without a worry about what creepy crawlies might swarm near my face or the dirt that would get on my clothes. Because there's not a bug in the world that would ruin my perfect day while I was stretched out on the grass and really believing that the world in ALL its creation really is a wonderful place. I just might take the time this weekend to relive this experience.

  10. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 8:08:32
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    Hi,

    Thanks to all who did this.

    I want to now explain how I see this. The order is deliberate because of the way that my eyes focus and how my brain actually processes information.

    1 It is an oak leaf that has fallen from the tree due to abscission as opposed to physical damage. It lays on a patch of green grass about 2 inches long.

    2 The leaf has signs of blight activity as evident from the scar spots although it was not so diseased that the leave was abscissed early. The grass was most likley cut about 2 weeks earlier and there is a lot of ground moss between the blades.

    3 The purple coloured veins of the leaf have not fully retracted and the colour faded showing that the leaf fell in the previous day or two and has not been on the ground long.

    After years and years of looking at fine details and drilling into an image I work on a series of layers where the detail gets finer and finer and my eyes pick out the contrasting details even down to the sub millimeter level and often from significant distances.

    This is what I call "getting your eye in", its the process of learning to see the finer detail in something or a situation which others may not see or feel are relevant. When I am hyper sensitive to these things I can literally see the scan lines flicker on my computer which makes going to the cinema to watch a 3D film almost painful for me.

    Its a lot like any crafts person who trains their skills, the perfumer or sommelier who can detect the faintest of odors or the art specialist who looks at the brush strokes to see if its original. It takes not only the appreciation that this level of detail exists but also the fact that humans can train to get better at them in the same way that an athlete trains to run faster, jump higher or throw further.

    The difficulty at times is getting people to understand that this level of detail actually exists and is accessible to people although sometimes with the aid of magnification or glasses.

    Thanks to everyone who spared the time to help illustrate this point you input is as always appreciated.

    David

  11. maltmom

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 9:12:19
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    Very interesting to read your explanation of how you view your photo. But, even the art appraiser you mention, who must isolate and concentrate on the brush strokes to make sure it's an original, must, at some point, step back and view the image as a whole to appreciate and take in it's beauty.

  12. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 13:25:33
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    Hi maltmom,

    Yes I agree, its the ability to scale between the "frames" and go from wider view to close up that makes me efficient at my job.

    When I train people to do this its usually at the aquarium as there is something about large containers of water that help you illustrate this point and how you can optimize the way you use your eyes to get the most out of them.

    I still enjoy the wider non macro world but increasingly find myself scanning my environment for the contrasting differences. I am often tested by people and one of my party tricks is to walk into a room for the first time, stand in the middle, slowly turn around (5 - 10 seconds) and then proceed to point out the painted in hairs, the marks, the small hair line cracks and the imperfections in the finish without looking. It comes from years and years of assessing and looking for the smallest of signs.

    David

  13. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 20:12:43
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    I still think Big Dummy's is the best description, but then I'm prone to liking Pinot Grigio and velvet Elvis paintings...as well as Pina Colada wine coolers that taste like kool aid.

    I wish I had an artist's eyes...heck I'd take 20-20 vision at this point. Ok, I deleted my slightly snippy soliloquy.

  14. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 20:28:54
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    Dhali - hand painted dream photographs and more layers than a wedding cake.

    And make a few if you envious I once stood in a gallery and looked at 7 of the Van Gogh sunflower paintings in the same room.

    Although my all time special art moment was when I saw the Tutenkarmoon exhibition in Berlin as a child. Such vivid colours it was close to a sensory overload.

    David

  15. theyareoutthere

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Tue Sep 30 2014 20:37:54
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    I looked at Van Gogh's sunflower paintings in one room. The only issue was that about 100 other people were in the same room. Thank God I'm tall.

  16. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Wed Oct 1 2014 7:02:56
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    Sorry TAOT on the rainy October morning I attended I did manage to get 15 seconds of only me in that room and there were rather magic seconds.

    David

  17. bed-bugscouk

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 16 2014 17:03:11
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    Just wanted to share something that I experienced last week. I took a little time out from London and ended up in Egypt on the red sea cost.

    One afternoon while snorkeling I had three bio-luminescent jelly fish drift past me. I saw only a few inches away and certainly close enough to marvel at the display or pulsing neon colors emanating from their cell clusters. The cells trigger in sequence so the lights appear to pulse down the length of the central core in bands which passed through a variety of colors before looping back around.

    For the few minutes I was able to enjoy it the only negative thought I had was the pity that I could not capture that beauty to share with you all. It really was nature at its finest and a sight I feel very privileged to have witnessed so close.

    The best I could find on YouTube was this:

    http://youtu.be/pFdkWlczkJM

    But it was nothing compared with being so close as to be able to see the compartmentalized cells.

    David

  18. wonttellmyname

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 16 2014 17:26:13
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    BigDummy - 2 weeks ago  » 
    I see a walrus, on a sailboat, eating a peanut butter and marshmallow sandwich, without a napkin, somewhere in the southeast, early spring I'd guess.

    Big D you are awesome.that's the first laugh i had in a long time!

  19. NY Bug Man

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 16 2014 18:52:46
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    New and old. I see beautifully growing green grass and leafs life has ended.

  20. SootiredSF

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 23 2014 16:16:09
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    peanutbutter and marshmellow sandwiches--I believe the Latin name is "fluffennutter" but surely the Walrus had a monogrammed napkin; it was probably just so neatly folded in his lap it was hard to see- poor dear has put on some weight

    I think I shall have a Fluffennutter now to intimidate my bedbugs

  21. Creepincrud

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    Posted 3 years ago
    Thu Oct 23 2014 18:09:58
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    It's too green and pristine to be autumn-ish, but there sits that leaf, lying his head off about it anyway, like we can't tell he crashed the party.

    Lovely detail!


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