911 dispatch centers in Jackson infested with bed bugs

by nobugsonme on June 2, 2017 · 15 comments

in 911 dispatch centers, bed bugs, bed bugs in the workplace, jackson, mississippi

Two 911 dispatch centers in Jackson, Mississippi have been infested with bed bugs, according to Mississippi News Now:

(If a video does not load above, you can watch it on the MS News Now site.)

According to MS News Now,

The insects are in two dispatch locations and the city is trying to track down the source. “Our 911 operators shouldn’t have to work in this type of environment,” said Mississippi Alliance of State Employees President Brenda Scott. Jackson city officials confirm that bedbugs have infested the temporary 911 center located at the EOC basement [in the Eudora Welty Library] on State Street and the 911 center on Tombigbee Street, which is under renovation. Pictures of the insects were taken by a city employee inside in the Tombigbee Street location.

The article mentions that some employees are refusing to go to work until the problem is solved. That’s proving very tricky, however. According to WJTV 12 in Jackson:

“We sprayed at the EOC location. They went away. Then they came back,” Chief Vance said. He added that by the end of this week, they plan to move the workers from the EOC location, “We’re going to have to move the personnel back to the communication center. But prior to doing that, we’re going to spray the communication center before we move them back. And then we’re going to go back down and spray the EOC again once they’ve left.”

 

Bed bug, Cimex lectularius

Image credit: Bed bug, Cimex lectularius by AJC1, used under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license

If employees have taken bed bugs home from work, they could be bringing them back in, so it’s important that any such problems are also identified and treated. Employees have been offered free home inspections by Terminex.

WJTV 12 also notes that one employee with bed bug bites has been home from work for three weeks and is on four different antibiotics.  It’s not clear what the treatment is for.  It’s possible for bed bug bites to become infected, but four different antibiotics seems unusual to me.  However, I am not a medical professional!  It would be good to know more about what the treatment is for.

I hope the city gets to the bottom of this problem soon. Workers in 911 dispatch centers do an important job and deserve to be comfortable and safe while at work.

(If a video does not load above, you can view it on the WJTV 12 website.)

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{ 15 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Livingagain June 2, 2017 at 11:00 am

Hahaha, clean up in aisle 5!

2 Livingagain June 2, 2017 at 11:03 am

But what I was going to say before I got distracted by that masterpiece, is that business environments are the hardest, it seems because of a lack of a focal point to treat. But we’ll see more of this as infestations aren’t controlled easily. I still wish people would put some time and research into the old sulfur burning solution, because it seems that with good tools and research it could be a reasonably inexpensive and effective solution for these big areas without a focal point. Or maybe Nuvan could design inexpensive tools for using their fumes.

3 NotSoSnug June 2, 2017 at 12:59 pm

Hey NoBugs, good to see you (over on the news part of your site)!

I lazily and somewhat hopefully thought perhaps there was nothing but good news since I rarely see bedbug topics in the media anymore. So I did a quick search through Google News and sadly there’s tons of bad bedbug news here and there, just not where I look on a daily basis. One gratifying bit of good bedbug news is Toronto is reinforcing it’s bylaws to force landlords to clear infestations before renting, with a max $100,000 fine levy, but some think that bylaw enforcement for insect infestations is unworkable.

http://www.macleans.ca/society/are-bed-bug-bylaws-a-good-idea/

4 nobugsonme June 2, 2017 at 4:51 pm

This does not make much sense without the spam, LivingAgain, but it’s funny.

5 Nobugsonme June 2, 2017 at 4:53 pm

LivingAgain, by focal point, do you mean harborage areas? Because every infestation will have those. It’s just a matter of finding them (and the usual most obvious harborage point, the bed, not being a factor).

6 nobugsonme June 2, 2017 at 4:54 pm

This is great news, NotSoSnug! It’s worth posting just to see you…

7 crossroads June 3, 2017 at 11:38 pm

That light brown carpet in the photos looks perfect from the bed bugs’ point of view.
It’s Jackson, Mississippi, shouldn’t they have white tiled floors? Would be a lot cooler for the employees and a lot harder to move around for the bed bugs!

8 nobugsonme June 4, 2017 at 1:20 am

Hi crossroads!
The articles mentioned the normal 911 call center was being refurbished. Perhaps, given the bed bug situation, they chose some less hospitable furnishings. I’ve noticed a lot of libraries and hotels have gone this route in the last ten years…

9 crossroads June 4, 2017 at 1:49 am

Hi nobugsonme, yes let’s hope so! Although as we all know, large organizations don’t always act rationally 🙂

10 Mike ragan July 12, 2017 at 2:02 am

Can’t sleep. Bed bugs have taken over. My kids where cleaning out a rental property and seen them in apartment. Well needless to say .within a month my home was infested. Naturally I did what most due is throw out mattress and furniture. Only to be left sleeping on the floor. Tried all pest control products. Helped some but few months full outbreak. Heated up house with heaters. Killed adults but noticed outbreak within month. Not sure what to do. I know heat kills them but I’m in an old mill house that has alot of places to hide. I’m a loss for words. Any help before I go insane. I can deal with any bug but bed bugs. These bastard are hard to kill.

11 nobugsonme July 18, 2017 at 1:05 am

Heat can work but it’s a lot more complicated than people think and it’s really not a DIY job. Please post to our active user forums for support and expert input: http://Bedbugger.com/forum/

12 lisa July 20, 2017 at 9:23 am

I believe you can heat safely if you have a gas wall heater that has no thermostat if it already 90 to a hundred outside, it has to reach 114 in the home, and of course remove all crayons, make up that can melt, crayons and candles.

13 nobugsonme July 20, 2017 at 1:58 pm

lisa,

You’d have to heat every area of your home simultaneously high enough to kill bed bugs. It’s one thing getting some part of your home to 116F. It’s another matter ensuring that there are no cool spots where bed bugs can relocate and weather the treatment.

That’s why pros who do treatment typically heat the home to about 140F, very quickly, and leave it there for 4+ hours. And even then, many now treat with chemicals or dusts as a backup, because bed bugs may survive.

DIY treatment can work if you do your research and learn what to do, but most people aren’t equipped with the right tools or knowledgeable enough to do a DIY heat treatment.

14 cilecto August 8, 2017 at 10:44 pm

I disappeared from this site for a while and kept meaning to check in. In the back of my mind I wonder if there are efficient new treatments that make life easier and the crisis is over. Now I see that we’ve barely budged from 9 years ago. Homes and offices are still getting infested. The responsible people deflect responsibility and people are burning down their houses. Great!

15 nobugsonme August 11, 2017 at 12:11 am

Cilecto,

Good to see you!

Alas, the problem persists.

I do think individuals are learning– this can pay off where government departments and landlords and other building managers learn to do better.
However, the problem persists and there’s no miracle yet.

A certain fungus has apparently now been approved for pro use, which is an interesting development for those who’ve been watching, though too early to call in terms of usefulness in the field.

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