Bed bugs found in two locations at Northwest Territories hospital

by nobugsonme on April 24, 2014 · 3 comments

in bed bug treatment, bed bugs, canada, Canada, hospitals, spread of bed bugs

Bed bugs were found in two different locations at Stanton Hospital in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, according to the CBC News article Bedbugs discovered at Yellowknife’s Stanton Hospital.

Bed bugs were found in both the staff lounge and men’s locker rooms.

Stanton Territorial Hospital, Yellowknife,

Stanton Territorial Hospital, Yellowknife, NT

Image by CambridgeBayWeather [CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

According to CBC News,

Staff who had used either of those areas were notified and told to remove their clothing, put them in sealed bags and given instructions for how to launder them properly when they got home.

Reid says pest exterminators have sprayed both rooms and furniture in the lounge has been destroyed .

The exterminator will return to spray both areas one more time and they’ve set traps in case other bedbugs show up.

The hospital reacted efficiently in sealing clothing and providing instructions for treatment, though hopefully items such as bags and shoes were not neglected.

I also note that destroying furniture seems like a waste of resources.

Bed bugs are likely to be a recurrent problem in public spaces like hospitals, so they would probably be better served by setting up a method to decontaminate infested items as big as chairs and beds. Heat is very reliable method of killing bed bugs when used properly.

Since staff or clients may come in with bed bugs at any point (and the locations here suggest staff are the likely source in this instance), teaching all staff how to detect bed bugs and react accordingly would also go a long way in preventing or controlling future introductions of bed bugs to the hospital.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 Richard Zimmerman April 24, 2014 at 7:54 am

Unfortunately, items such as beds, sofas, recliners, etc. Cannot be effectively treated to achieve 100% certainty that you have eliminated all bed bugs. Don’t fallvvictim to thr “heat is cure all” for bed bugs. Common sense tells you if you were sitting in a room and the temperature began to rise to 90, 100, 110 degrees, you’re going to vacate the area. What could possibly make a person think that the bug is going to voluntarily sit still and be cooked…..THEY’RE NOT!! Placing clothing in a dryer for 30 – 45 minutes will work because the bug cannot escape. Washing clothes is not effective; hot water is not hot enough to kill them and they can possibly survive. And, after washing, not all items can be placed in a dryer without damaging the fabric. But if you place a dry garment in a dryer, the fabric will not be damaged, and you can achieve the desired result. Learn about the bug, exercise common sense, don’t be duped by a pest control company just interested in taking your money, and always, always, always practice safe bed bugs.

2 Lou Sorkin April 24, 2014 at 11:12 am

“Unfortunately, items such as beds, sofas, recliners, etc. Cannot be effectively treated to achieve 100% certainty that you have eliminated all bed bugs. Don’t fallvvictim to thr “heat is cure all” for bed bugs. Common sense tells you if you were sitting in a room and the temperature began to rise to 90, 100, 110 degrees, you’re going to vacate the area. What could possibly make a person think that the bug is going to voluntarily sit still and be cooked…..THEY’RE NOT!!”
Yes, beds, sofas, recliners, etc. can be effectively treated with high heat, low vapor steam, certain insecticides, containerized heat treatments, general heat treatments, etc.
Richard, how hot is a person? You might leave a room because it gets up in the 90s, but aren’t we around 99F? If bed bugs are attracted to heat from their desired host, why crawl away when the temperature around you is getting to be time for dinner? They get very excited and hunt for the host when at that temperature. Bed bugs don’t crawl away from warmer temperatures, but will when it approaches a lethal temperature. Heat from a dryer works quite well, but don’t forget that is higher than 100 F. And, certainly, they are contained in a metal/enamel tomb at the time of application.

3 nobugsonme April 25, 2014 at 11:50 pm

Learn about the bug, exercise common sense, don’t be duped by a pest control company just interested in taking your money, and always, always, always practice safe bed bugs.

Hi Richard,
Heat is a reliable killer of bed bugs. If you actually read my post above, I was suggesting that items such as beds and chairs could be reliably decontaminated after bed bugs. Hint: I don’t mean by treating the room they’re in.

Hotels, hospitals, housing providers and others can purchase or possibly even construct a reliable oven for treating infested furniture. Some have already done this. Just as with the dryer, one key is making sure they don’t escape.

Structural heat treatment can work, and yes, it can also fail. However, that isn’t really what is being suggested above.

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