25 Grant Street in Denver, Colorado: bed bugs for two years

by nobugsonme on June 10, 2008 · 11 comments

in bed bug laws, bed bug legislation, bed bug task force, bed bug treatment, bed bugs, colorado, denver, landlords and tenants, public health

This MyFox Colorado article claims that this beleaguered building in Denver at 25 Grant Street has had ongoing bed bug problems for two years.

Denver’s Environmental Health Department says they have had complaints about bugs there for more than two years.

The property is owned by Shockor Management and is telling tenants they will spray once again this week. But the bugs don’t seem to be going away.

That has prompted many to move out, leaving many of their couches and bedding in the garbage.

Former tenant Jackie Howe moved in two months ago not knowing there was an ongoing bed bug problem. She’s now had to flee.

Renting units in bed bug infested buildings without notifying prospective tenants should be illegal.

The City says they know about the history of complaints and says that every time the owners are citied (sic), they comply and spray as they will again this week.

What is unanswered is why the spraying isn’t killing the bed bugs.

It isn’t clear what kind of bed bug treatment follows these citations, however, if treatments are not aggressive enough (approximately every two weeks, in every unit with bed bugs, until every last bed bug is gone) it would begin to explain why bed bug problems persist.

Tenants discarding possessions as they flee the building, some of which are surely being reclaimed by other tenants, are probably another contributing factor.

While pesticide resistance may be a factor, these other two considerations are even more obvious problems, and should not be discounted.

I hope Denver’s Environmental Health Department will work on more comprehensive solutions to fighting bed bugs in Denver (which we know are not just a problem in this one building). They should consider what actions are required by landlords and tenants once infestations are detected, ways of collecting bed bug-infested refuse to keep it from infesting other homes, and a public education campaign to help educate all of Denver on how to recognize, avoid, and fight bed bugs (once detected).

The same types of considerations should be undertaken by cities and counties and other authorities elsewhere.

Ordering landlords to treat once bed bugs are detected is too vague and simply not enough to get rid of bed bugs permanently.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
1 fightorflight June 11, 2008 at 5:04 am

As an (unfortunately former) Denver resident, thanks for this and the insightful commentary about it.

2 Rochelle August 16, 2008 at 3:35 pm

1620 Grant Street, The Winbro, is a building completely infested with bed bugs. There have been complaints about the issue for over a year. Not only are they not taking care of the problem well enough but they are also not telling people about the problem before moving in.

3 Brandon August 21, 2008 at 12:21 pm

I have a friend living in that building “The Winbro” at 1620 Grant Street. He just moved in and he got many bites. We reported it to the rental office and they gave him a form letter describing the problem and saying they would treat it. A FORM letter!!! Clearly this is a problem. The woman was rude and very hard to deal with. We are going to file a complaint with the Denver Environmental Health Department.

4 nobugsonme August 22, 2008 at 1:04 am

A form letter does seem like a bad sign, Brandon. Good luck to your friend.

5 clint August 25, 2008 at 7:15 pm

I came across this doing some research this is not just a local problem but starting to be a national one as well the problem comes once an infestation takes place and people leave or move they take the bug’s with them and it start’s another infestation to another it’s not just hotel’s or apartment’s but also movie theaters can get an infestation from one person and well you get the picture. The problem is the egg’s are immune to the poison that the pest controller uses.
I have read lot’s of stuff on the internet from google search to youtube one of the promising leads I have had is using bed bug powder by diatect which seem’s to work.
How do I know I have bedbug’s and am on Day two with no Bites

6 Gary Smith March 17, 2009 at 2:12 am

I live in a Apartment in Englewood, Colorado.
And this Apartment Building is Infested with bed bug’s, and the Management is blaming other Resident that because this resident has bed bugs and that is were your’s came from. When they spray one Apartment they just move to another one.

7 Ihatethesebugs July 16, 2009 at 3:42 pm

I think the apartment buildings should be required to have these inspected prior to renting these out. I just moved into an apartment only to find out it was infested after we moved all of our stuff in. The landlord acted annoyed when we called and told him about it (followed by filling out their officially maintenace request). He then claimed that the bugs were not there prior to us moving in. (We’d only been in the apartment 5 days and never had bed bugs prior). His reasoning for them not being there prior was “I know they weren’t living in a vacant apartment with no food source”. Apparently, he doesn’t know much about these bugs because as we all know, they can live months without food.

Also, after sanitizing and quarantining all my linens, clothing and shoes, we went back to my grandmothers house were we I had been staying prior waiting for PCO. Guess what. . .no bites.

I know the advise on this site is not stay with other people. I took every possible precaution to make sure these were not spread, however I have foster child that’s being feasted on like a Turkey on Thanksgiving. Meanwhile I have 3 social workers and a daycare asking where these bites are coming from. I couldn’t continue to let this baby be eatin alive.

8 nobugsonme July 16, 2009 at 4:27 pm

Ihatethesebugs,

I hope that some of the advances in detection tools make such routine inspections (before rental) commonplace, but right now, it is so tricky and expensive to inspect, I suspect few are bothering. The misconceptions you refer to about bed bug behavior are also a factor — most people would not think bed bugs could hide easily or stay in an empty home.

I am so sorry you were going through this with a foster child — and yes, there are circumstances where you just cannot stay. The situation then is that it becomes hard to treat the home, if no one is sleeping in it.

Good luck and I hope your troubles with bed bugs are over soon.

9 kyle July 21, 2009 at 5:13 am

ok this may seem like a sad story but i lived there…. and i got online to see if i could look up places that had bed bugs so this wouldnt happen again and the address i was living at the first to come up.. i threw away everything i owned that was furniture. or cloth….. the rental business refused to pay some money back and the rental wasent even cheap the rent out in the first place… i even saw fox news do this story right out front .. this is a outrage .. if i wasent poor and in school i would sue the shit out of this place… oh and they sprayed about once every two months not two weeks total bullshit…. the lady that rents the apartments out is named tamera and her phone number is on the front of the building for renting information and tells no one of the infestation…

10 Jane Doe March 17, 2010 at 12:25 am

I used to live in this apartment building too. Same thing happened to me. Such an uncomfortable time for me. I threw my bed away and moved out! Shockor should go out of business!

11 Jane Doe March 17, 2010 at 12:29 am

Oh and I know why the bed bugs were not dying was because there are dirty people in that building who did not vacuum and take the bedding off (wash it and put in bags) and prepare for the spraying. There was even a woman there that would go through the trash and brings things back into her apartment. It’s too bad because my apartment was cute and I would have stayed there. Tamara was quite mean to me. I feel bad for anyone that has or will go through this situation at this building or anywhere. Now, I am freaking out about where to move next and I have been out of the place for 2 years!!!

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: