ABC 7 Eyewitness News: Edison, NJ infestation

by nobugsonme on May 22, 2007 · 26 comments

in bed bug treatment, bed bugs, new jersey

ABC7 just aired a story in their news at 5. It was less urgent than a blood-covered intruder in Coram, Long Island, but beat out the 60-year-old mother of twins. (Mazel tov, Mrs. Birnbaum!)

Here’s the transcript. The video is here (scroll down to Bed Bug Invasion in Edison Apartment Complex).

Seriously, the lead-in was more exciting than the story itself about a bed bug infested complex at 1 Dayton Drive in Edison, New Jersey. A number of tenants were interviewed. When one tenant described the bed bugs as the size of small roaches, the ABC7 camera focused in on a small cockroach with the voiceover “they’re called bed bugs” (thanks, ABC, but that was a roach). But they also (later) got at least one shot of a bed bug, so we know what we’re dealing with. I was worried, for a moment. (Remember at the end of last summer, when NY1 news flashed a dust mite close-up while talking about bed bugs, around the time of the City Council Hearing? I sound like an old timer, sorry.)

One tenant showed her most recent bite scar, which didn’t look too recent. But she said they spray and then after a month the bed bugs come back. (Well, treating once a month, if that’s what’s happening, is not frequent enough.) Reporters also said the health department had to come out and check the severity of the infestation. Middlesex Management claimed tenants were not being cooperative with their efforts. Ahhhh, the blame game.

My main concern with this segment (besides the roach confusion) was that Middlesex Management were doing the treatment (which ABC called “fumigation”). (They actually showed someone from the management company spraying a unit.) Middlesex Management is the complex’s management company, and though it’s possible they have an experienced bed bug PCO on staff, I was concerned about this. Bed bugs require persistent careful treatment by experienced PCOs. I hope the Middlesex Management PCO is very experienced with this very hard-to-treat pest. If not, they might find it worthwhile to seek out a bed bug specialist.

It’s good to see bed bugs in the news. It is good to have people saying on the news that when bed bugs are really bad, you see them in the daytime. They claim to have had bed bugs for years. I really hope they get some help soon.

It’s been a big news day here at Bedbugger.com. We’re no Daily Show, but we do want to keep you informed. My goodness, Jersey is getting hit hard this week.

Update (5/23): more on this story from Home News Tribune. The upshot? If you live in the area, be warned: a lot of these folks are going to be moving soon, according to the article. The local government should realize that a badly infested complex which drives people away will lead to many more infested complexes.

Also from this article:

Township officials said Monday they had no record of complaints about any infestation at Hilltop Apartments. Officials said health inspectors would visit the complex today.

One guy said he had complained. The moral? If your building is seriously infested, get all your neighbors to call the landlord, the health dept. and the housing dept. of your city. (I know sometimes people hesitate, but if it’s this bad and everyone is thinking of moving, why not organize them to call?) If everyone does, maybe the management will get on the Vikane train. Your problem could be cleared up before you have a chance to sign a new lease. Organize, people, organize.

Update #2 (also 5/23): This article is even more interesting in terms of follow up. Health inspectors have today been investigating 118 complaints in the 24 buildings of the complex (these appear to be smaller, low-lying buildings).

Township spokesman Jerry Barca said the township hoped to work with Hilltop management to rid the complex of the bugs and educate tenants about how to protect themselves from future infestation.

“We go into this looking to work with tenants and management to make this problem go away,” Barca said. “But if the worst case scenario arises, we do have the right to prosecute. We also have the authority to make sure people have a safe place to stay.”

That’s good to know.

The management claims they’ve been fighting the problem for three years but that the bugs keep spreading. They blame tenants for bringing in used mattresses:

He said the management has been working with pest-control companies. At first, the management company hired one exterminator to get the problem under control, but one was not enough. They have now hired a second firm.

Barca said, when investigators inspected Tuesday, they “found that the management has successfully treated 69 complaints.”

Barca said township inspectors had difficulty checking individual units Tuesday because many residents were not home.

But, he added, “We are going to compel the management to take care of every unit.”

Health inspectors will be on-site everyday and will help educate tenants in different languages (dialects) on how to deal with the bug problem, Barca said.

Gulics agreed that tenants need to be educated.

He said a couple of weeks ago, management had a meeting with tenants to tell them about the bug issue and how to keep their apartments clean.

“We will continue to educate the tenants to eliminate the problem,” said Gulics.

He said in the past tenants have picked up “mattresses from the Dumpsters and these are mattress that were already infected by the bed bugs.”

He said, “We clean, and they bring the bugs back. We need a team approach” to control the bed-bug problem.

They do need a team approach. Not finger pointing, but education (including necessary translators being on-site for the sessions) and support. I am sure that in any large multi-unit infestation, some tenants are going to aggravate the problem by bringing infested items back in. They need to be provided with information from a trusted source about why this is a bad idea. Management needs to help facilitate this, and realize that the “trusted source” may have to be someone else besides management, as in this case, the health dept.

I long for widespread public education campaigns, public service ads on TV and bus shelters. But in the meantime, anyone treating their rental property needs to get creative about educating, and enlist help in doing so. Yes, tenants need to listen and cooperate. But management also needs to take drastic action sooner. Three years with bed bugs is too, too long.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail
1 wantmyskinback May 22, 2007 at 7:35 pm

Once again…a nice piece. THanks. I wonder if you shouldn’t write to ABC news and give them some informative feedbacck on their story, Nobugs? They’ll most likely air what you wrote in…and thus we’ll get more action in the news. THoughts?

2 James Buggles May 22, 2007 at 8:41 pm

The residents seemed relatively nonchalant. And they didn’t seem to have bite marks on their faces.

Echoing what Winston said about the source of bedbugs in the New York area, I couldn’t help but notice that the residents are from the middle east and South Asian subcontinent. Perhaps Winston will expand on this topic. Immigrants whose countries never really got rid of bedbugs probably have more of a backbone when it comes to living with them than we third, fourth, fifth, etc. generation Americans do.

That reporter was brave — or perhaps she doesn’t know about the risks of entering such an infested environment. As NoBugs has said, if you see them crawling on the walls during the day …

3 nobugsonme May 23, 2007 at 8:48 am

Update (5/23): more on this story from Home News Tribune. The upshot? If you live in the area, be warned: a lot of these folks are going to be moving soon, according to the article. The local government should realize that a badly infested complex which drives people away will lead to many more infested complexes.

Also from this article:

Township officials said Monday they had no record of complaints about any infestation at Hilltop Apartments. Officials said health inspectors would visit the complex today.

One guy said he had complained. The moral? If your building is seriously infested, get all your neighbors to call the landlord, the health dept. and the housing dept. of your city. (I know sometimes people hesitate, but if it’s this bad and everyone is thinking of moving, why not organize them to call?) If everyone does, maybe the management will get on the Vikane train. Your problem could be cleared up before you have a chance to sign a new lease. Organize, people, organize.

4 parakeets May 23, 2007 at 9:33 am

Hey, what’s twins when bedbug can have 300!

5 jessinchicago May 23, 2007 at 12:02 pm

Nobugs, I remember the dust mite incident all too well. I think that one had me banging my head on my desk. This time, at least they incorrectly identified a bug that’s BIGGER than bedbugs, as opposed to dust mites!

I’m excited to see more news coverage, and I was happy to hear some things that were accurate and made sense (roach closeup aside). Did you hear the maintenance guy talking about vacuuming the entire apartment and washing clothes on hot and bagging them in separate bags? Good stuff. I hate to say this, because I’m pretty much always on the side of the tenant, but I noticed a LOT of clutter that did not appear to have been managed or disposed of in those apartments. I’m not judging them, and maybe I’m mistaken, but if you’re trying to eliminate a bedbug infestation from multiple units, it’s gotta be really difficult to do so with piles of books and papers scattered all over the floors in many of the units. Just a thought.

Thanks for the coverage of this story, Nobugs.

6 James Buggles May 23, 2007 at 7:19 pm

Jess makes a good point. Let’s remember that it’s not the landlords or hoteliers that are infesting apartments and hotel rooms — though their inaction can make a bad situation worse. Honestly, if Jess had lived next door to me and I had gotten bedbugs from her used mattress, I would have probably sued her. Nothing personal, just exercising my rights.

7 James Buggles May 23, 2007 at 7:21 pm

Oh yeah — and Jess should have sued the person who gave her that mattress.

8 nobugsonme May 23, 2007 at 9:43 pm

Update #2 (also 5/23): This article is even more interesting in terms of follow up. Health inspectors have today been investigating 118 complaints in the 24 buildings of the complex (these appear to be smaller, low-lying buildings).

Township spokesman Jerry Barca said the township hoped to work with Hilltop management to rid the complex of the bugs and educate tenants about how to protect themselves from future infestation.

“We go into this looking to work with tenants and management to make this problem go away,” Barca said. “But if the worst case scenario arises, we do have the right to prosecute. We also have the authority to make sure people have a safe place to stay.”

That’s good to know.

The management claims they’ve been fighting the problem for three years but that the bugs keep spreading. They blame tenants for bringing in used mattresses:

He said the management has been working with pest-control companies. At first, the management company hired one exterminator to get the problem under control, but one was not enough. They have now hired a second firm.

Barca said, when investigators inspected Tuesday, they “found that the management has successfully treated 69 complaints.”

Barca said township inspectors had difficulty checking individual units Tuesday because many residents were not home.

But, he added, “We are going to compel the management to take care of every unit.”

Health inspectors will be on-site everyday and will help educate tenants in different languages (dialects) on how to deal with the bug problem, Barca said.

Gulics agreed that tenants need to be educated.

He said a couple of weeks ago, management had a meeting with tenants to tell them about the bug issue and how to keep their apartments clean.

“We will continue to educate the tenants to eliminate the problem,” said Gulics.

He said in the past tenants have picked up “mattresses from the Dumpsters and these are mattress that were already infected by the bed bugs.”

He said, “We clean, and they bring the bugs back. We need a team approach” to control the bed-bug problem.

They do need a team approach. Not finger pointing, but education (including necessary translators being on-site for the sessions) and support. I am sure that in any large multi-unit infestation, some tenants are going to aggravate the problem by bringing infested items back in. They need to be provided with information from a trusted source about why this is a bad idea. Management needs to help facilitate this, and realize that the “trusted source” may have to be someone else besides management, as in this case, the health dept.

I long for widespread public education campaigns, public service ads on TV and bus shelters. But in the meantime, anyone treating their rental property needs to get creative about educating, and enlist help in doing so. Yes, tenants need to listen and cooperate. But management also needs to take drastic action sooner. Three years with bed bugs is too, too long.

9 James Buggles May 24, 2007 at 2:30 am

This problem will only reinforce Americans’ love affair with single family housing — and who can blame them? I once thought I’d buy a condominium someday. I’ve since changed my mind. When I buy, it’ll be a new house.

10 jessinchicago May 27, 2007 at 10:06 pm

Buggles, I don’t think suing me (or encouraging me to sue the person I got the mattress from) would do any good. For starters, if you sued me, you’d be in for one heck of a fight. Here’s why: not only did I take that mattress from my coworker last May, but I had also been to a conference in California that month and I stayed at a hotel, which could have caused my infestation. I had also had family stay with me that month, and I had just moved into my new apartment, too. So, although I (wrongly) speculated that my bedbugs came from the mattress, the source could have been many other things.

Further, if you were my neighbor and you sued me for “giving” you bedbugs, you can bet your bottom dollar that we’d stand in the courtroom and I’d point my finger at YOU. Because what we have in common, standing in that courtroom, is sharing a wall and having bedbugs. How can you possibly know that your infestation came from me? And how can you prove it? My infestation could just as easily have come from you, and there’s no way you could prove otherwise.

So, if you tried to sue me, you better be prepared to explain, in front of the judge and everyone else, in great detail, every single move you had made in the months prior to my infestation. I’d make sure you accounted for every mode of transportation you took, every store you walked through, every purchase you made, every visitor you had in your apartment and every person you visited, every doctor you saw, every appointment you kept- I could go on and on. You would be forced to account for every single minute of every single day of every month leading up to the time I got bedbugs. And then you’d have to honestly say how many times you were potentially exposed to bedbugs. That would probably be, what, hundreds? Possibly thousands? Am I making my point?

Suing me would do you no good, and it would only serve to prolong our mutual miseries. In the end, there would be no winners or losers, no monies exchanged, and no points made. It would be, in a word, futile. The fact of the matter is no person can prove that he or she got or gave bedbugs to someone else. It’s impossible. Don’t sue each other, people. It just won’t work.

11 willow-the-wisp May 28, 2007 at 12:11 am

So right on Jess! Thanks!
For me suing is akin to blaming but in a most deleterious way for both parties.

12 willow-the-wisp May 28, 2007 at 12:15 am

However … suing a management company that has done shody or innapropriate or conter-productive treatment for an infestation is another matter all together. And especially if they had received word via registered certified mail.
Now see “that” temps me dearly. I would have a case for some settlement there if I could proove it. I’m on the table there still as t oshoud could will I.

13 James Buggles May 31, 2007 at 2:01 pm

You file a lawsuit with a reasonable suspicion, not because you know all the facts. You can always drop the lawsuit if the facts start stacking up against you. If the case proceeds to trial, you must prove your case by a preponderance of the evidence, which means more likely than not.

Most people would not file such a lawsuit and most lawyers would not accept it for practical reasons — Jess’ ability to pay a judgment. But if you’re willing to pay legal fees and want to find out what happened, a lawsuit is the surest route to finding the truth. It’s the only way to force people to sit for interviews.

So, what hotel was that in California? The problem with bedbug anecdotes is that people never provide details — except for that Best Western in Santa Monica.

14 nobugsonme May 31, 2007 at 2:53 pm

James, with all respect, since I appreciate your comments and participation here, my point was that finding out the truth about bed bugs and where they came from is not an easy or straightforward matter. You’re applying a logic that does not work with bed bugs. You can have bed bugs and not know it. For a long, long time. And I don’t mean not looking under your mattress when you change the sheets, or not vacuuming your sofa. They can be MUCH more elusive than that. And the person who discovers them first is not necessarily the first place they took root in a building. Above all else, the most obvious possible cause is not always the cause. I talked about this here, in another comments thread, but not sure if you saw it.

Let me paint this COMPLETELY FICTIONAL scenario in more detail: let’s say you and “Mildred” are neighbors. Let’s say you are not allergic to bed bug bites and Mildred is. You have had bed bugs since last October, just after you made a trip to Hawai’i . But you do not know this, since you are not allergic, there are not many, and you have not seen one yet. Unallergic, you are untroubled by them. There’s no reason to look. They come out between 3-5 am.

It’s February and you’re still the only one with bed bugs, and you still haven’t noticed. Let’s say you go away on business for a few weeks. The bed bugs get hungry in your absence, and Mildred, right next door, starts getting bitten. It takes her months to find out the cause (bed bugs) because she does not see them. When she finally suspects bed bugs, she tells the landlord, who rolls his eyes, and thinks what a pain in the ass she is, bringing in vermin, of all things.

He gets a PCO in to inspect. The PCO finds bed bugs only after a thorough search–much more thorough than Mildred’s. She never would have found them at this stage, but she’s so darned allergic. She had to make the bites stop.

Where did they come from? Mildred racks her brain. She hasn’t been on vacation. No one has visited her (she has a studio apt. and there isn’t really a set-up for entertaining). No one at work has a bed bug issue (she asked, and her two co-workers are like family, they’d tell.)

In December, a close friend (Rose) gave Mildred a gently-used Queen-sized mattress. Rose bought a new one because she got married to a tall guy and needed a California King. She knows Rose well, and Rose and her family never itched. She’d been in Rose’s home often. But Mildred has been reading Bedbugger–second-hand furniture is such a no-no. Used mattresses! They’re in all the bed bug news reports.

Meanwhile, the landlord said he asked the neighbors and no one else is being bitten, just Mildred. Did she go on vacation? How could this have happened? Where else could the problem have come from?

Mildred feels great shame. She likes her apartment and she does not want the landlord and neighbors to suffer. She’s a good person. She assumes her second-hand mattress is the source of the trouble. It must be. And so she pays for the PCO’s treatment, even though the landlord is liable, because she feels at fault. She also tosses her mattress. It’s not worth trying to save, and why not just be clear of the problem?

But a course of PCO treatments sets her back a bundle and clears the problem for only a few months. Then they come back. How frustrating! She got the best guys and paid a lot of money.

A few months after Mildred sought treatment, you start to see bed bugs. You wake at 4 am one morning, and see one scurrying away on the bed. Oh no! Now you have your neighbor’s problem, you think. (Actually, you are the reason the bugs keep going back to Mildred. You are the source, and your untreated problem has finally grown to where they are so plentiful you can see them.)

The landlord, you, and the other tenants still blame Mildred–it’s obvious she was first, isn’t it? Now the whole building needs treatment. The landlord wants Mildred to pay for everyone’s treatment.
Meanwhile, it was NEVER her fault in the first place.

What if, on the last day of the Hawai’i trip, you had a falling out with your travel partner, who you haven’t had contact with since the trip. You both finally realize how silly the fight was, and now you’re in touch again. The friend, unlike you, was allergic to bed bugs, shows up now, months later, telling you that bed bugs came home after the trip–and were seen immediately on their end. Wow, you were exposed too. Could they have been in your apartment since October? They probably were. What if, somehow, this gets out and the landlord and Mildred find out?

In this scenario, it would ALSO be wrong for Mildred to try and sue you. Why? Because James, you were not allergic and did not see them. You noticed no signs. It happens–people have bed bugs for months and months and do not see them. Those unallergic to bed bugs really can have no idea, for a long time. The allergic people find the bugs first, but it does not mean they were the first to have them.

But wait, there’s another reason Mildred should not sue you–even if your Hawai’i friend did come down with bed bugs right after your trip, it’s not proof that you also got them then. Maybe the friend got them from a connecting flight you were not on, on the way home. Maybe you got them from a dinner guest a month later. (I am not trying to make people panic here, bed bugs are statistically unlikely to strike both friends, and to be so easily picked up, and you and friend would be having a horrible run of luck, but I am making the point that it is possible that what SEEMS to be the cause is not the cause.)

James, I have seen this scenario–the blame game described above, based on apparently likely scenarios that are not the only possibility– described by several readers. People have reported to me that what was thought to be the cause was later seen not to be. Other things sometimes come to light. (How often do other causes exist which don’t come to light?)

Because bed bugs can hide well, because there’s no reason why the person who got them first is the first one to discover them, and because “possible causes” of bed bugs are not necessarily the real cause–for all these reasons, a lawsuit is not going to necessarily uncover any truths when it comes to who is responsible for bringing bed bugs into your home.

Often, sure: the reason is pretty obvious (eg your whole building is infested, you discover bed bugs: no brainer. I bet you got them from the neighbors.) But most times, people are guessing. Guesses can be very wrong.

And given the current climate, where most people in the general public do not know diddly squat about bed bugs or how they move or how stealthy they can be, it’s even plausible your landlord or you yourself could convince a judge Mildred was responsible (without the friend from Hawai’i details coming to light), if such a case even went to trial. I would seriously hope that Mildred had some sense and got someone who could speak to the very qualities of bed bugs which I am describing. Because if you and the landlord prevailed, it would not be an outing of truth, but a travesty of justice.

I want to be clear that I am not tossing out all lawsuits as pointless, but simply pointing out that lawsuits that try to ascribe blame to the source in a multi-unit infestation, are pointless.

The one person you can blame is the landlord IF the landlord was alerted AND given time to treat them AND the treatment was shoddy or scant and did not eliminate the problem. That’s something you can know. And prove.

Thanks for reading this–if anyone still is reading it! I know it was long, but I’ve tried to make the same point with more brevity in other posts and comments.

15 willow-the-wisp May 31, 2007 at 3:43 pm

cool post. (read 90% of it)

16 hopelessnomo May 31, 2007 at 5:08 pm

Nobuuugs! You had me at California King!

James, a lawsuit is most definitely not the surest route to the truth! I recommend some David Mamet to disabuse you of that notion. 🙂

17 James Buggles May 31, 2007 at 5:59 pm

Excellent fact pattern. Also, Hopelessnomo is correct. I should have said “legal truth,” not “truth” as in absolute.

Now, assuming all the above events, let’s suppose another neigbor who is also allergic sues Mildred. Mildred’s lawyer will suggest as a defense that she is not the cause. As a result, her lawyer will depose her neighbors. Upon doing so, everyone will learn about the trip to Hawaii and the girlfriend. The lawsuit will expand with more parties impleaded — including that hotel in Hawaii. Maybe that airline too. Now you’ve got a deep pocket or two. The judge could very well toss out the case because the causation chain is too tenuous, but you never know.

One additional note. You say the guy who went to Hawaii is not negligent. Are you sure? Maybe the case will reach an appellate court that establishes a new duty to take precautions upon returning from a trip. Stranger things have happened.

18 willow-the-wisp May 31, 2007 at 6:54 pm

James if that ever happend I’d be all for it becase it would reduce the spread of those little …. (you can all fill in your own curse-word-symbols on the line provided :_____________ 🙂

19 nobugsonme May 31, 2007 at 7:43 pm

James–

You have to read between the lines. Yes–your analysis of this legal situation holds up. But what I was trying to show is that “you” got the bed bugs in Hawai’i and gave them to Mildred.

Or, did you?

(Cue 60’s TV “surprise” music: duh doh dah!)

Actually, you ride the subway every day to work. There are infested benches. The girlfriend had bed bugs, but got them in a different place than you did. You could have gotten them from the subway, or a bar, or your therapist’s office. But there’s no way your lawyer could find out those places are all infested. Some people’s PCOs can’t even find the bugs biting in their bedrooms.

My point is that any time during any day, any normal day, when you take a taxi or go to a restaurant or ride a subway, you COULD pick up bed bugs. If you were not allergic, you would not know. How can you be considered negligent, and what did you neglect to do?

Your analysis supposes that Mildred and her lawyer can figure out these possibilities for other sources. What I’ve seen is bed bug victims like Mildred assuming their own guilt, and it was later cast in doubt–after they paid the price.

20 nobugsonme May 31, 2007 at 7:45 pm

ps
James, did you compliment my “fact pattern”? Not sure exactly what it is, but I think I like it. Thank you!

21 ElAINE bUTTS June 5, 2007 at 6:42 pm

oUR HOUSE and us are being stung at night by something we can not see. We have had 5 bug companies poisoning our house and we are still finding black specks about the size of a quarter of a grain of pepper. We are air conditioning, dehumidifiers going I am using Natural Genesis Kleen Free and we are still being stung any ideas. Help it is about to drive me crazy it is biting my cat and dog , my husband and me. I went to visit my momn in a nursing home and hospital and Bingo It”s infected our house. Please help if any ideas write me or call me —

**Elaine, I deleted your phone number. If people want to contact you, they can leave a comment here, and you can both Private Message (PM) each other in the forums if you have registered for the blog.

22 parakeets June 5, 2007 at 6:59 pm

What you describe sure sounds like bedbug scat. Air-conditioning and dehumidfiers have nothing to do with killing bedbugs. Kleen Free only kills on contact, so unless you see them, you won’t be killing them. I don’t know what “5 bug companies” means, but you could have 500 hundred bug companies treat and it woudln’t do anything if they don’t know about bedbugs. When I first got bedbugs more than a year ago, we called several pest control companies. Many of them were not knowledgeable about bedbugs, saying things that were patently false. I knew more about bedbugs than they did. You have to find a PCO who specializes in bedbugs and who will spend time, not just come and spray the baseboards as if you had fleas or roaches.

23 jessinchicago June 5, 2007 at 10:03 pm

Hi Elaine-

Welcome to the blog. I encourage you to visit our FAQs, which will provide you with some really handy information that might help you understand your situation a little better. After you read the FAQs, you might want to check out our forums. You can get there by clicking the blue bug on the upper right side of your screen. You can chat with people who are battling bedbugs, or who have battled and won. There are lots of interesting ideas on the forums, and it’s important to remember that none of us are experts, but we all want to help.

The best thing you can do is hire a competent PCO (exterminator) to help assess your situation and point you in the right direction. There is an FAQ written by an experienced PCO that details how to go about choosing your PCO in our FAQ section. I hope you read it.

One last thing. Remember that this is a public blog, accessible by anyone at any time. If you’d like to remove your phone number, you can do so by editing your comment, or I would be happy to do so for you if you’d prefer. It’s up to you, but it might be best if you kept your private information private, for your own safety.

Again, welcome.

🙂

24 willow-the-wisp June 6, 2007 at 1:20 am

hi Jess, it’s been a while. Just turning in for the night and saw your post: (I don’t have a way to edit a blog post that I know of.) Forums–Yes! Blog posts–no. Don’t have or know how to
night
willow.

25 nobugsonme June 6, 2007 at 11:23 am

Willow,
No– on the blog, you’re commenting, not “posting”. You can’t edit your own comments, only an administrator can.
You can let me know if you have a serious concern, but typos just have to slide. Sorry :-p

26 willow-the-wisp June 6, 2007 at 5:50 pm

this is good to know–thank you

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: